All the Other Things I Really Need to Know I Learned from Watching Star Trek, the Next Generation

Overview

Through engaging anecdotes from his own life, and calling on his near encyclopedic memory of events in the lives of Captain Picard, Riker, Data, Worf and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise-D, Dave Marinaccio demonstrates how the universal appeal and commonsense wisdom of Star Trek: The Next Generation (as well as Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager) can help to shape a positive and humorous outlook on life.
Read More Show Less ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (30) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $60.00   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Through engaging anecdotes from his own life, and calling on his near encyclopedic memory of events in the lives of Captain Picard, Riker, Data, Worf and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise-D, Dave Marinaccio demonstrates how the universal appeal and commonsense wisdom of Star Trek: The Next Generation (as well as Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager) can help to shape a positive and humorous outlook on life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671010003
  • Publisher: Pocket Books/Star Trek
  • Publication date: 5/1/1998
  • Series: Star Trek Series
  • Pages: 167
  • Product dimensions: 5.43 (w) x 8.57 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Introduction

Call me Dave Marinaccio. It's not as catchy as Ishmael, but I too have taken a journey. Well, not so much taken a journey as been taken on one. You see, I've never left my great white couch.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the Starship Enterprise NCC-1701-D visits me several nights a week in my living room. He does most of the talking. This doesn't mean the relationship is one-sided. I find Picard a most engaging fellow, and I've learned a great bit by residing in his presence.

He's not perfect. For starters, he's a fictional character. Of course, I've met many of those in my chosen occupation, advertising. In truth, Jean-Luc has more real substance than many of my professional brethren.

He's bad for my eyes when I watch him in the dark. And he must bear some of the burden for my expanding waistline and softening sofa springs. Still, when all is said and done, he's expanded my imagination at least as much as my belt size.

"But Dave, Star Trek is just a television show." heard that phrase a lot over the past couple of years. Ever since I wrote All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Watching Star Trek.

As a society we are hypnotized by television. The average American TV set is switched on over six hours a day. More people believe television news than believe newspapers. That little electronic box in our living rooms, dining rooms, dens, bedrooms, attics, basements, garages, kitchens, and bathrooms has changed the way we live. But when I dared to suggest that there is actually something to be learned from watching the tube, people looked at me as if I were from space.

Learn something from TV? You must be nuts. Why don't you go read a book? Books contain knowledge. Television is a vast wasteland, an idiot box, the boob tube. Incredibly, even hosts of television talk shows jabbed fun at the notion that I had found something of value on TV. Go figure.

If they're right, if there's nothing to be learned from TV, then I'm toast. I'm glued to that sucker. It takes me two turns to get home at night. First I turn the doorknob and then I turn on the set. Even when I'm not watching, it stays on. It's on now. I don't like to turn my back on it but I've got it trained. Me and my Zenith.

More to the point, I would like to suggest that the medium is not the message, and we shouldn't, like Elvis, shoot the messenger. Television is a conduit. It's neither better nor worse than other forms of communication. What's being conveyed is what's truly important. The source of ideas is not as important as the substance of the ideas being expressed. Pretty heavy stuff, huh?

How about this? Ask yourself a simple question. Where do you think you will be exposed to more elevated ideas, in a television show written by Gene Roddenberry or in a book written by Fabio? Romance-novel fans should note that this a rhetorical question.

Watch any Star Trek or Star Trek: The Next Generation episode (or movie, or successive television spin-off), and you will visit a universe filled with ideas and lessons you can use in everyday life. Really. The most important of which is that someday the human race will actually like itself. Look at the bridge of the Enterprise-D. This is virtually the only show on television where all the major characters are good. They all treat each other with decency and respect. And -- hold on to your seats -- everyone gains from the experience.

Taking this idea a step further, they even try to treat the alien species they encounter in the same high-minded manner. This concept is so worthwhile, so noble, I can deal with a few latex alien creatures wearing silly noses and ears.

Other lessons cover the gamut of life on earth, like:

  • It's OK to wear a beard to work.
  • How to design a logo.
  • The importance of exercise.
  • How to tell twins apart. (If you don't know how, an evil twin can confuse you into thinking he's -- I mean "he is" -- the good twin and feed you to a Crystalline Entity.)

And there's plenty more where those came from.

So I invite Picard into my living room. He brings along Riker and Troi and Data and Q. They're all welcome. So are Sisko and Janeway and Kirk. It can get crowded in here.

Yeah, I know Star Trek is just a TV show...just a well-written, imaginatively conceived, wonderfully entertaining television show with a strong morally centered philosophy that has so far spawned The Original Series, The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, a cartoon series, eight movies, countless novels, technical manuals, and a convention phenomenon thrown in for good measure.

In the next few pages I'll share some of the things I've discovered watching The Next Generation. Yes, I mean some of the things I've learned. There's a lot there. Maybe even everything you really need to know. Perhaps even enough to live long and prosper.

Copyright © 1998 by David Marinaccio

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)