All the Rage: The Story of Gay Visibility in America / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$20.01
(Save 31%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $3.50
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 87%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $3.50   
  • New (5) from $9.88   
  • Used (9) from $3.50   

Overview


From the public outing of Ellen DeGeneres and the success of Will and Grace to the vicious murder of Matthew Shepard, recent years have seen gay lives and images move onto the center stage of American public life. In this incisive and authoritative guide to the new gay visibility, Suzanna Danuta Walters argues that we now live in a time when gays are seen, but not necessarily known. Taking on the common wisdom that equates visibility with full integration, All the Rage maps the terrain on which gays are accepted as witty film accessories and sassy sitcom stars yet denied full citizenship.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The love that once dared not speak its name now dances at Disneyland's annual gay day and sells Bud Lite. Heck, even Bart Simpson questions his sexuality, while nobody questions South Park's Big Gay Al's, and there is no ambiguity about Saturday Night Live's Ambiguously Gay Duo. This comprehensive survey of gay and lesbian visibility in popular culture offers a whirlwind of facts, figures and documentation of gay representations. Acknowledging television's past e.g., Mike Wallace's 1967 CBS report reconfirming many homophobic stereotypes Walters concentrates on post-AIDS entertainment in which gay characters and themes appear everywhere from HBO's Oz to The Drew Carey Show to that bastion of backlash, Ally McBeal. A double edge runs through Walters's countless examples: does this visibility indicate acceptance, or does "gay chic" just characterize a profitable niche market? Moreover, are these trends destructive? An associate professor of sociology and director of women's studies at Georgetown, Walters (Material) quotes activist and writer Sarah Schulman as criticizing "the creation of a false public homosexuality that is palatable and containable and... not authentic." Walters's analyses are often astute the Roseanne gay marriage show was more about Dan and Roseanne confronting their own homophobia than about homosexuality but occasionally reductive, like her assertion that the film Boys in the Band is "filled with... self hatred" mightn't it be commenting on self-hatred? Citing academics Kath Weston, Josh Gamson and responding to mainstream critics, Walters's initial distrust of this visibility gives way to grudging appreciation in a clear, up-to-date map of the basic debate overhomosexuality in the media. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Should gays and lesbians exult in the recent spate of media depictions of their lives or shudder at the homogenized sterilization of their diversity? Against the backdrop of the 1980s and '90s, Walters (Sociology & Women's Studies/Georgetown Univ.; Lives Together/Worlds Apart, 1992) analyzes the promise and the threat of queer portrayals in contemporary media: although the number of these programs and personalities has skyrocketed, the resulting depictions of gay and lesbian life often emerge as disturbingly skewed. In a nutshell, her thesis contends that increased gay representations in the media may entail that America sees the gay and lesbian community more frequently than ever; however, due to the stereotypical visions of queer life-such as psycho dykes, ditzy fashion homos, and lesbian chic-this visibility does not correspond with an increased knowledge about homosexuality. With a sweeping range, Walters probes the cultural repercussions of such characters as Dynasty's tortured bisexual Steven Carrington and the all-too-chaste Matt of Melrose Place, as well as examining specific episodes of programs including Roseanne (when Mariel Hemingway kissed the eponymous heroine) and the coming-out episode of Ellen. Films also come under scrutiny, as Walters considers the differences between queer portrayals in mainstream Hollywood and those in independent films. And there are chapters on gay marriages, coming-out stories, and queer parenting-and an analysis of advertising images of gay and lesbian life, in which Walters dissects the commercialization of the queer community (pointing to a predictable display of gleaming teeth and toned bodies). A frenetic packing of materials that leavesin-depth analysis mostly sacrificed for a panoramic view-but the resulting picture nevertheless emerges as detailed and refined.
San Jose Mercury News
Walters has written a provocative book about the implications of the new gay visibility. . . . A smart, sharply argued book.—San Jose Mercury News

— Charles Matthews

Baltimore Sun
Walters' argument rarely falters and her assessment of how we utilize popular culture as a sop to escape granting full citizenship is succinctly stated. . . . Sharp and savvy, Walters has a keen sense of pop culture and the mores it represents.—Baltimore Sun

— Victoria A. Brownworth

The Nation
Walters is attentive to confusing contradictions and to the possibilities for progressive change they present. . . . It's hard to argue with her insistence that a critical consciousness of both the pitfalls and possibilities presented by today's increased visibility is essential to advancing the gay agenda in the new millennium.—Nation

— George de Stefano

Voice Literary Supplement
So now we have our visibility. Time to take our self-esteem and shut up? In All the Rage, Suzanna Walters sets out to weigh this question in a balanced and systematic way.—Voice Literary Supplement

— Michael Warner

Guardian

"After introducing readers to the main threats to birds and regions at high risk, Bird Watch presents a visually stunning and scientifically accurate flight over the major bird habitats."—Guardian

San Jose Mercury News - Charles Matthews

"Walters has written a provocative book about the implications of the new gay visibility. . . . A smart, sharply argued book."—San Jose Mercury News

Baltimore Sun - Victoria A. Brownworth

"Walters' argument rarely falters and her assessment of how we utilize popular culture as a sop to escape granting full citizenship is succinctly stated. . . . Sharp and savvy, Walters has a keen sense of pop culture and the mores it represents."—Baltimore Sun

The Nation - George de Stefano

"Walters is attentive to confusing contradictions and to the possibilities for progressive change they present. . . . It's hard to argue with her insistence that a critical consciousness of both the pitfalls and possibilities presented by today's increased visibility is essential to advancing the gay agenda in the new millennium."—Nation

Voice Literary Supplement - Michael Warner

"So now we have our visibility. Time to take our self-esteem and shut up? In All the Rage, Suzanna Walters sets out to weigh this question in a balanced and systematic way."—Voice Literary Supplement

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226872322
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 9/15/2003
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 356
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author


Suzanna Danuta Walters is an associate professor of sociology and director of the Women's Studies Program at Georgetown University. She is the author of Material Girls: Making Sense of Feminist Cultural Theory and Lives Together/Worlds Apart: Mothers and Daughters in Popular Culture.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments
Prologue
Part One: It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times
1. The Love That Dares to Speak Its Name: The Explosion of Gay Visibility
2. Pride and Prejudice: The Changing Context of Gay Visibility
Part Two: A Kiss Is Just a Kiss
3. Ready for Prime Time? TV Comes Out of the Closet
4. Dossier on Ellen
5. All Gay, All the Time?
Part Three: Coming Soon To a Theater Near You
6. Hiding, Dying, and Dressing-Up
7. Out Is In: Liberal Narratives for the Nineties
Part Four: In the Family Way
8. Wedding Bell Blues: Imagining Marriage
9. Mom, I've Got Something to Tell You: The Coming-Out Story in the Age of Visibility
10. It Takes a Lesbian Village to Raise a Child: Parenting Possibilities
Part Five: Money Makes the World Go Round
11. Consuming Queers: Advertising and the Gay Market
12. If It's Pink We'll Sell It: Gay Entrepreneurship
Conclusion: Beyond Visibility (Welcome to Our Rainbow World)
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)