Overview

All the water in the world is all the water in the world.

We are all connected by water, and this message is beautifully, lyrically delivered from poet-musician-author George Ella Lyon. Where does water come from? Where does water go? Find out in this exploration of oceans and waterways that highlights an important reality: Our water supply is limited, and it is up to us to protect it. Dynamic, fluid art paired with pitch-perfect verse makes ...
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Overview

All the water in the world is all the water in the world.

We are all connected by water, and this message is beautifully, lyrically delivered from poet-musician-author George Ella Lyon. Where does water come from? Where does water go? Find out in this exploration of oceans and waterways that highlights an important reality: Our water supply is limited, and it is up to us to protect it. Dynamic, fluid art paired with pitch-perfect verse makes for a wise and remarkable read-aloud that will resonate with any audience.On sale: 03.22.11
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Pattern-driven digital illustrations pair with concrete verse to express water's cyclical nature: "Thirsty air/ licks it from lakes/ sips it from ponds/ guzzles it from oceans/ and this wet air/ swirls up." In a bone-colored landscape in another part of the world, a child in a hut and wild animals in a barren tree await a gray storm cloud. When a torrent comes, a lullaby-like line assures: "Honey,/ living things dream/ of water," and a mother with long, brunette hair embraces her child, droplets from her hair coalescing into tiny animal silhouettes. A lyrical and bighearted outpouring. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
* "Lots of picture books introduce young children to the water cycle, but few have such an infectious beat and eye-catching illustrations as this title, which begs to be read aloud. With occasional rhymes, the short, poetic lines are conversational and instructive and evoke a sense of mystery.... What kids will respond to immediately, though, are the noisy, delicious sounds and rhythms in the words as well as the kinetic energy in the beautifully composed, atmospheric digital illustrations, which have the richly patterned and textured look of paint-and-paper collage. Playfully arranged type in changing fonts adds to the visual fun while giving cues for energizing read-alouds. On the final, stunning spreads, a mother’s hair swirls into a wave of water that becomes a joyful spiral of living creatures, all reinforcing the simple, profound message: our lives depend on 'so precious' water."
BOOKLIST, March 15, 2011, *STAR

* “Lyon briefly explains the water cycle in lyrical verse and celebrates its power to give life... The digital collage like illustrations pair dramatically with the text to depict this contrast. Turquoise endpapers usher in pages with swirls of water, water spouting from a hose, through pipes, down mountains. Rain pours down in horizontal and vertical spreads. But brown and cream-colored pages reveal a bare landscape where a little girl and animals alike anxiously anticipate an approaching rain cloud. At last, “this wet wonder” arrives and flows through all creatures, including a young child and mother whose water-sprinkled hair spreads across the pages to become a swirl of tiny creatures and plants. “Honey, living things dream of water...so precious,” says the narrator. We must “keep it clear, keep it clean… keep Earth green!” Filled with rhythm and sound, this offering begs to be read aloud.”
School Library Journal, May 2011, *STAR

“Lyon celebrates the essence of life itself in a lyrical presentation of the water cycle…Meanwhile, in sweeping, digitally rendered art resembling watercolor and collage, Tillotson creates luxuriant ocean swirls and pelting streaks of rain…It’s a familiar subject but a vital one, to which author and illustrator bring a passion and artistry that give it the power of story.”
The Horn Book Magazine, May/June 2011

"This book totally immerses the reader in the water cycle. From blue end papers and thrashing water on the title page, we’re taken to a view of the tiny blue planet Earth from space. From space, the author moves to the familiar: water coming from a hose, puddles, and a cup of water. The author explains the water cycle using a wealth of vocabulary quite artfully and effectively. You feel the words. Evaporation is shown by having the words “swirl up” and rise up the page from the sea. The use of blues, purples, and greens to convey wetness is quite effective, as is the use of browns and beige depicting a place where very little water is available. There is total integration of illustration and text. A child reading this book will understand the water cycle, and that they need to be good water stewards. This is a good science read-aloud for the primary grades."
Highly Recommended
- Library Media Connection, October 2011

Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
Learn about water. This story opens with the way we commonly come in contact with water such as from the garden hose, in pools, and from the faucet. Readers are treated to poetic words about the water cycle. For instance, evaporation is described as thirsty air licking, sipping, and guzzling water. Then, readers make a ninety degree rotation with the book at one point to read about the build up of condensation leading to precipitation. In contrast to the rain storms, the story moves to arid regions where there is precious little water. The close of water's story is about the value and importance of water for all living things. The illustrations are colorful. The collages create different textures and patterns. One interesting illustration has subtle silhouettes of animals in celebration of water. This book would make a wonderful addition to a study unit and a springboard for discussion about the water cycle, water conservation, and more. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Lyon briefly explains the water cycle in lyrical verse and celebrates its power to give life. "Water doesn't come./It goes./Around./That rain...has been here before," a result of water that evaporates into the air, "swirls up" into the clouds, and comes down again as rain. The precipitation is described as a "tap dance/avalanche/stampede/of drips and drops and drumming—/a wealth of water." In dry areas of the world, however, cups are empty, the soil has turned to dust, and "Everything waits...for rain sweet and loud." The digital collagelike illustrations pair dramatically with the text to depict this contrast. Turquoise endpapers usher in pages with swirls of water, water spouting from a hose, through pipes, down mountains. Rain pours down in horizontal and vertical spreads. But brown and cream-colored pages reveal a bare landscape where a little girl and animals alike anxiously anticipate an approaching rain cloud. At last, "this wet wonder" arrives and flows through all creatures, including a young child and mother whose water-sprinkled hair spreads across the pages to become a swirl of tiny creatures and plants. "Honey, living things dream of water...so precious," says the narrator. We must "keep it clear, keep it clean… keep Earth green!" Filled with rhythm and sound, this offering begs to be read aloud. Rochelle Strauss's One Well: The Story of Water on Earth (Kids Can, 2007) discusses the importance of water for older children.—Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442432956
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 3/22/2011
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 716,278
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • File size: 14 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

George Ella Lyon grew up just down the road from Blanton Forest, the largest old growth forest in Kentucky, and has always felt most at home in the woods. Some of her recent titles include the ALA Notable All the Water in the World, the Schneider Family Book Award–winner The Pirate of Kindergarten, the Jane Addams Peace Award Honor Book You and Me and Home Sweet Home, and Planes Fly! A novelist and poet, she lives with her family in Lexington, Kentucky. You can find out more online at GeorgeEllaLyon.com.

Katherine Tillotson is the illustrator of several children’s books. For the story of It’s Picture Day Today, she cut paper that she created herself by drawing patterns on paper with paste, a centuries-old technique that crafters may be familiar with. Ms. Tillotson lives in San Francisco with her husband. Visit her at KatherineTillotson.com.

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