All the Way Home

( 1 )

Overview

The friendship of Augie Schuler and Sunny Yamagata spans the years from the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the Japanese-American internment camps to the tumultuous era of Civil Rights in 1960s Mississippi. Together the two girls share their secret longings, pursue their dreams and eventually discover the true meaning of faith and family.

"Readers who are jaded and skeptical about the quality of Christian novels will find [All the Way Home] a fine example of the progress being made in the category....Tatlock employs ...

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Overview

The friendship of Augie Schuler and Sunny Yamagata spans the years from the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the Japanese-American internment camps to the tumultuous era of Civil Rights in 1960s Mississippi. Together the two girls share their secret longings, pursue their dreams and eventually discover the true meaning of faith and family.

"Readers who are jaded and skeptical about the quality of Christian novels will find [All the Way Home] a fine example of the progress being made in the category....Tatlock employs flashbacks efficiently, and her rich descriptions and characterizations are unusually fresh and inventive." - Publisher's Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Readers who are jaded and skeptical about the quality of Christian novels will find Tatlock's fictional exploration of racial discrimination, hatred and the human heart a fine example of the progress being made in the category. It's a memoir-like tale of Augusta Augie Schuler Callahan, an eight-year-old German-Irish girl growing up in California who, as the youngest of six in an abusive and alcoholic family, informally adopts Sunny Yamagata and her Japanese-American family as her own in the late 1930s. War soon separates Augie from her beloved friends, who are deported to an American internment camp for Japanese-Americans. After losing touch for 23 years, they meet again in Mississippi in the racially torn 1960s, where Sunny is working to establish voting rights for blacks. Injustice is a funny thing... live long enough and you're going to get rained on, Sunny tells her friend, and as the story draws to a conclusion, they are challenged to make choices that reflect their own conflicts about race and forgiveness. Tatlock (A Room of My Own; A Place Called Morning) adeptly traces the girls' journey of faith with a light and sometimes humorous touch. She does an excellent job juxtaposing the horrors of Americans in Japanese hands and Japanese-Americans in the hands of their countrymen. Tatlock employs flashbacks efficiently, and her rich descriptions and characterizations are unusually fresh and inventive. Other Christian novelists would do well to emulate this quality contribution. (July) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Against the turbulent backdrop of the Vietnam War, journalist Augie Schuler Callahan reflects on her girlhood in 1938 Los Angeles as she travels to a small Southern town to cover a story. She fondly recalls the Japanese American family who all but adopted her and her friendship with their daughter, Sunny, and agonizes over the end of their relationship when Sunny's family was sent to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. When Augie arrives in Mississippi, she discovers that the woman who convinced her to come is Sunny, who is working to establish voting rights for blacks. As the two get reacquainted, they become involved in the conflict between the Ku Klux Klan and the local African American community. Tatlock (A Place Called Morning) writes well, but her emphasis on drawn-out scenes of injustice at the expense of the small, more human elements make her clever juxtaposition of the social issues-the civil rights struggle of the 1960s and the incarceration of Japanese Americans in the 1940s-less thought-provoking and fascinating than it could have been. (For example, while she goes into excessive detail depicting a sit-in on the lawn of a courthouse, Tatlock spends less time exploring Sunny's complicated decision to have plastic surgery to alter her Japanese appearance.) While there are more overt Christian elements than in her first novel, A Room of My Own, a brief, unflattering scene of a priest in a Catholic church may offend some. However, multicultural characters are still a novelty in Christian fiction, so this is recommended for most collections. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780983319658
  • Publisher: Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas
  • Publication date: 8/31/2011
  • Pages: 640
  • Sales rank: 321,692
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.42 (d)

Meet the Author

Ann is the author of eight novels. Her books have received numerous awards, including the Christy Award, the Midwest Book Award and the Silver Angel Award from Excellence in Media. She enjoys teaching and serving as writing mentor at numerous conferences and workshops throughout the year. Ann lives with her family on the side of a mountain in beautiful Western North Carolina. You can read more about her work at www.anntatlock.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2005

    Wow

    I really, really enjoyed reading this epic novel. I at first was drawn to it because Sunny was Japanese (I like the Japanese) and so I checked it out of our local library. But once I got started, I just couldn't stop till I got to the bottom of the story! 'What happens to the Yamagatas?' 'What happens to the Negroes who wanted to register to vote?' 'Who exactly is Howard Draper?' These were questions that would fill my mind till I finished reading. I highly recommend this novel to everyone who likes stories about racial discrimination and some romance. A special thanks to Ann Tatlock: This is a wonderful novel, plain and simple!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2003

    Worth the read!!

    I enjoyed this novel very much. The writing was impressive, the plot was powerful, and it carried a strong message.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2002

    An Inspiring Tale

    One of the best books I have read in awhile...serves to make you cry and laugh and want to get out there and do something with your life

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted February 10, 2013

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    Posted June 23, 2012

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    Posted June 23, 2012

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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