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All Things Considered
     

All Things Considered

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by G. K. Chesterton
 

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Musings on life from one of England's greatest writers G.K. Chesterton.
In this collection of more than 30 essays, the brilliant writer and satirist considers red wine, fairy tales, chasing after his hat and the difference in teaching French and British students in relation to architecture.
Chesterton is well known as a novelist, essayist, storyteller, poet,

Overview

Musings on life from one of England's greatest writers G.K. Chesterton.
In this collection of more than 30 essays, the brilliant writer and satirist considers red wine, fairy tales, chasing after his hat and the difference in teaching French and British students in relation to architecture.
Chesterton is well known as a novelist, essayist, storyteller, poet, philosopher, theologian, historian, artist, and critic. His essays prove him to be also a witty journalist and student of human nature.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781481098502
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
11/26/2012
Pages:
190
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (29 May 1874 - 14 June 1936), better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox."

Time magazine has observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories-first carefully turning them inside out."

Chesterton is well known for his fictional priest-detective Father Brown, and for his reasoned apologetics.

Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify this position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton's "friendly enemy" according to Time, said of him, "He was a man of colossal genius." Biographers have identified him as a successor to such Victorian authors as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, Cardinal John Henry Newman, and John Ruskin.

In 1896 Chesterton began working for the London publisher Redway, and T. Fisher Unwin, where he remained until 1902. During this period he also undertook his first journalistic work, as a freelance art and literary critic. In 1902 the Daily News gave him a weekly opinion column, followed in 1905 by a weekly column in The Illustrated London News, for which he continued to write for the next thirty years.

Chesterton's 1906 biography of Charles Dickens was largely responsible for creating a popular revival for Dickens's work as well as a serious reconsideration of Dickens by scholars.

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All Things Considered 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read from one of the greatest wits of the century.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quite a humorous read; you might have to look up some of the historical references to fully appreciate them, but his ideas on daily life are very, very um....true!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago