All Things Imperial Beach: History, Places to Go, Things to Do, and Reader Stories from the Last 40 Years

All Things Imperial Beach: History, Places to Go, Things to Do, and Reader Stories from the Last 40 Years

by Various contributors
     
 

Long before California became a state, Imperial Beach was part of several ranchos: Tia Juana, La Punta, and Melijo. By the 1830s, Santiago Arguello obtained grants for all.

In 1891, the region was known as South San Diego. According to the San Diego County Advertiser (July 15, 1891), �the �head of bay country� is fast becoming the Oakland of San Diego. Many…  See more details below

Overview

Long before California became a state, Imperial Beach was part of several ranchos: Tia Juana, La Punta, and Melijo. By the 1830s, Santiago Arguello obtained grants for all.

In 1891, the region was known as South San Diego. According to the San Diego County Advertiser (July 15, 1891), �the �head of bay country� is fast becoming the Oakland of San Diego. Many of the citizens do business in the city, and at the same time are improving ranch homes in this beautiful district.�

In 1906, E. W. Patterson, manager of the South San Diego Investment Company, wanted to attract investors from the Imperial Valley. Convinced he needed a flashier name, he called the area Imperial Beach and lauded its four miles of sand dunes and blue Pacific. The name became official when the local post office adopted it in 1909.

For a waterfront lot, Patterson�s company charged $25 down and $25 a month.

Today, the most Southwesterly City in the Continental U.S. lies between two borders: Mexico three miles across a protected marsh to the south; affluent Coronado to the north. A number of residents of the Crown City own property in I.B., where at least 65% of the population rents, many calling their owners �slumlords.�

The borders pinch. At night, helicopters clack and whoosh overhead, searchlights sweeping the streets and alleys for undocumented visitors from the south.


For many years, I.B. was, as a resident boasted, �the last affordable beach town in Southern California for the working man.�

Also �a place where people who can�t afford to live near the beach live near the beach.�

That is changing. How, and how fast, is a hot plate topic.

Read about the most important annual events, landmarks, and institutions that make Point Loma what it is. Plus nearly 40 original nonfiction stories from the San Diego Reader archives.
Ideal for visitors and locals alike!

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149798971
Publisher:
San Diego Reader, Inc
Publication date:
07/21/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
5 MB

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