All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo [NOOK Book]

Overview

In All Things Must Fight to Live, Bryan Mealer takes readers on a harrowing two-thousand mile journey through Congo, where gun-toting militia still rape and kill with impunity. Amidst burnt-out battlefields where armies still wrestle for control, into the dark corners of the forests, and along the high savanna, where thousands have been slaughtered and quickly forgotten, Mealer searches for signs that Africa's most troubled state will soon rise from ruin.
At once illuminating ...
See more details below
All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$11.99 List Price

Overview

In All Things Must Fight to Live, Bryan Mealer takes readers on a harrowing two-thousand mile journey through Congo, where gun-toting militia still rape and kill with impunity. Amidst burnt-out battlefields where armies still wrestle for control, into the dark corners of the forests, and along the high savanna, where thousands have been slaughtered and quickly forgotten, Mealer searches for signs that Africa's most troubled state will soon rise from ruin.
At once illuminating and startling, All Things Must Fight to Live is a searing portrait of an emerging country facing unimaginable upheaval and almost impossible odds, as well as an unflinching look at the darkness that continues to exist in the hearts of men. It is non-fiction at its finest-powerful, moving, necessary.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Former Associated Press correspondent Mealer recalls four unnerving years in Congo. In 2003, the author was a freelance reporter in Kenya, striving to find noteworthy stories he could sell to American publications. His search was mostly in vain, until the AP's Nairobi bureau chief suggested a trip to Congo, where a fearsome clash between the Hema and Lendu tribes had just led to many hundreds of deaths. Mealer's subsequent stint in Congo forms the backbone of his potent memoir. From the moment he arrived, it was clear that the country was collapsing into chaos. The author pulls no punches in describing the sights that flickered before his eyes from his bases in Kinshasa and Bunia, or in retelling gut-wrenching stories related to him by the residents of towns decimated by violence. In Mudzipela, he talked to people who had witnessed beheadings, bodies chopped into pieces and even a man feasting on human remains. He muses on the vast differences between his own life and the lives of the Congolese, whose incredible stoicism in the face of monumental slaughter was something he never really adjusted to. Mealer occasionally returned home during his tenure, and brief passages about his life in Brooklyn provide an effective contrast. The author frequently mentions the respite both he and the locals found in music: the Congolese in Kinshasa's ever-present live performances, "brash and thumping and spilling down the street at four a.m."; the author in headphones clasped firmly over his ears at night to drive away the day's horrors. The book takes a sudden, unexpected turn in its final pages with a lengthy account of Mealer's trip aboard a rickety old train through the southern province of Katanga,a journey in search of hope and signs of rebuilding in this battle-scarred country. Gutsy, richly descriptive recollections effectively conjure grisly events in a troubled nation. Agent: Heather Schroder/ICM
From the Publisher
“Mealer’s talent for detail, deftly rendered, lifts his material toward the sublime.”—Christian Science Monitor

“[A] troubling expose of the brutalities suffered by those in war-racked Congo.”—Chicago Tribune

“With vivid prose and compelling emotion…[Mealer] reports his own “creeping emotional atrophy” as he is repulsed and then spellbound by the violence and by the courageous people who struggled to make sense of the fighting.”—Booklist

“A perceptive, empathetic, stomach-twisting presentation of the human condition during chaos…A quiet paean to the courage he has witnessed, and its final salute to ‘the many proud people of Congo’ is as much eulogy as affirmation.”—Publishers Weekly

“Bryan Mealer has put his life on the line to bring us a story of terror and courage from the heart of Congo…Both as a journalist and as a reader, my hat’s off to Mealer.”—Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781608196678
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 1/8/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 1,222,228
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.81 (d)
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Bryan Mealer was born in Odessa, TX and spent his childhood in West Texas and San Antonio. He graduated with a degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, and spent time as a city reporter for the Austin Chronicle. He then moved to New York City and worked as an assistant editor at Esquire magazine before moving to Nairobi, Kenya to become a freelance reporter. He later was the Associated Press staff correspondent in Kinshasa, Congo. He now lives in Providence, Rhode Island and contributes to several magazines.
Bryan Mealer was born in Odessa, TX and spent his childhood in West Texas and San Antonio. He graduated with a degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, and spent time as a city reporter for the Austin Chronicle. He then moved to New York City and worked as an assistant editor at Esquire magazine before moving to Nairobi, Kenya to become a freelance reporter. He later was the Associated Press staff correspondent in Kinshasa, Congo. He now lives in Providence, Rhode Island and contributes to several magazines.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Map

Ch. 1 In the valley of the gun 1

Ch. 2 Daily blood 49

Ch. 3 Waiting for cobra 96

Ch. 4 The river is a road 151

Ch. 5 "Un petit deraillement" 220

Epilogue 293

Acknowledgments 297

A note on sources 299

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    Excellent

    This book startled me with its truth. Intellectually a jewel of a book. Tells us so much we can barely take it all in. A must-read of vital importance.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 7, 2011

    Overal educating book

    Good explanationbof miserable life in Congo but also its natural beauty. I can say most political facts are truth exept Rwandan implecation an role in conflict. Its like thw writer is scared to talk about Tutsi attrocities against Congolese and hutus.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 26, 2011

    Could not even force myself to finish it

    There are several good, first hand accounts - this is not one of them. This book is more focused on the author's experience and feelings rather the people/events in the Congo.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Surviving the Chaos

    Bryan Mealer is one courageous dude. Check out this harrowing memoir; an unbelievably gripping account of his four years spent covering the brutal wars in Congo. This amazing book is an unflinching account of man's inhumainity and a testament to the will of average people as they try to eek out an existence amidst unbelievable suffering, mayhem and destruction. As a career Army officer who has been to Africa and also Iraq and Afghanistan, I am in awe of the amount of courage and tenacity Bryan demonstrated living the events that make this narrative so gripping, moving and utterly unfortgettable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2008

    Initially heartbreaking but ultimately redemptive journey through the heart of darkness of Congo's modern civil war

    Bryan Mealer, an editor and journalist for Harper's and Esquire takes us on a journey through the last seven years of the Congo, the nearly unknown and underreported but bloodiest civil war in recent history, where over 4 million people died. The first half of the book nearly breaks your heart as it describes a war of unprecedented savagery that imposed terrible suffering on civilians. The second half describes two journeys of hope against all odds, one up the fabled Congo River and one on the last operating rail line in the Congo. In turns lyrical and profoundly moving, All Things Must Fight to Live is a must-read if you care about Africa, peace and the dignity of each human being. Mealer proves a worthy successor to Joseph Conrad in his beautiful non-fiction narrative. Highly recommended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)