×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Allah's Revenge
     

Allah's Revenge

4.8 5
by Pete Barber
 
Dawud, an Arab genius, creates a nanotechnology weapon capable of destroying the human race, yet small enough to conceal in a hint of perfume.

Recruited by Allah's Revenge, a Palestinian terrorist organization, he triggers worldwide panic when his weapon suffocates the passengers on a crowded London train in ninety seconds, filling their lungs with hard, black

Overview

Dawud, an Arab genius, creates a nanotechnology weapon capable of destroying the human race, yet small enough to conceal in a hint of perfume.

Recruited by Allah's Revenge, a Palestinian terrorist organization, he triggers worldwide panic when his weapon suffocates the passengers on a crowded London train in ninety seconds, filling their lungs with hard, black charcoal.

Quinn, an English detective, is first on the scene. A British journalist has a link to the terrorists, and Quinn uses him as bait to flush them out.

When their demands are not met, Allah's Revenge wipes out the world leaders attending the G20 summit in South Korea, including the US Vice President.

Quinn tracks the terrorists to their lair in Jerusalem and seems to have the weapon under control, but then it is unleashed in Phoenix, Arizona, and Quinn needs all his wits and courage to prevent a horde of nanobots from decimating America.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780985523008
Publisher:
PJ Publishing
Publication date:
05/15/2012
Pages:
354
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.79(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Allah's Revenge 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
penandtome More than 1 year ago
David Bakers has a secret. In the Islamic world he is known as Dawud Ferran, member of Allah's Revenge terrorist group and inventor of a nanobot weapon of mass destruction. British Police Inspector Steven Quinnborne sees first hand the destructive powers when a subway train full of people fall prey to a small amount of the substance. It begins a worldwide chase and an inhumane end for a select few. Mechanical weapons are more effective than regular terrorist bombs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
literarymuseVC More than 1 year ago
Terrorist fiction is on the rise and Allah's Revenge is at the top of the list of a possibility that could create death and mayhem enough to destroy any nation or nations. This plot involves the creation of a nanobot that could be used for energy production (the obvious disguise herein) but instead is used to dispense a chemical that instantly kills its victims, leaving a deadly charcoal residue. Horrors! The plot is simple but potent. After the first attack on a British subway, the race is on to find both the killer and the technology that created such a viral disaster. In the process, others will die and as usual any and all Arabs are suspect. One journalist who is an okay Arab is mistaken as such initially but then manages to reclaim freedom and vows to take down whoever is behind this insane plot. The goal seems almost ludicrous in the light of the devastation being unleashed, the freeing of Palestinian prisoners. The story gives a very good description of how a terrorist is groomed for what comes to be believed as a divine mission for Allah. One senses the slip from rational to psychotic will and tenacity that guarantees success. Yes, the plot for more assassinations will be foiled but it's a roller coaster ride that Pete Barber crafts to rivet the reader and create tension and an almost sick feeling as the story progresses. Nicely done, Pete Barber and may it never happen in reality!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fast-paced thriller that brings together technology and terrorism. Dawud, a brilliant scientist, develops nanobots that can be programmed to create fuel by consuming garbage. After having a religious experience, he turns the technology into a weapon that can kill large amounts of people, just by breathing it. It is scary, thinking that such a thing could possibly exist. The story was well-written and kept me on edge until the very end. The characters were fantastic and helped to keep me reading because I cared about what happened. It wasn't just about terrorists, but about people. The story sounded interesting, but ended up being better than I expected. Plenty of nail-biting suspense kept me riveted.
Kerry_Nietz More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed “Allah’s Revenge.” From beginning to end it is a top notch thriller. It reminded me of books written by Michael Crichton or Preston & Childs, especially when it came to the frenetic pacing, the use of cutting-edge technology, and the everyday hero. And the villains could’ve come straight out of a Bond novel. All the characters were great, really. Extremely well-written. I applaud Mr. Barber for coming up with a terrorist scenario that is both believable and increasingly more likely. (And for not bowing to political correctness!) He even explores some of the root causes for world terrorism. I applaud that as well. Seriously, this book is great all the way around. A surprising feat for a first-time novelist. If I were to critique anything, it would be one scenario where some of the bad guys meet their untimely end. I think as a reader I might have enjoyed being more a part of that, as opposed to seeing just the end result. But that is extreme nitpicking on my part, because honestly, this was a really fun book for me. Worth all five stars. I highly recommend it! (** Note to parents and young readers: There is a smattering of adult language here, as well as some sexual situations—but none of it is what I would call gratuitous or above the norm for this type of thriller. Again, if you’ve read the authors mentioned above, you’ve probably read similar.)