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Allergies, Away!: Creative Eats and Mouthwatering Treats for Kids Allergic to Nuts, Dairy, and Eggs
     

Allergies, Away!: Creative Eats and Mouthwatering Treats for Kids Allergic to Nuts, Dairy, and Eggs

by Frances Park
 

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When sisters Ginger and Frances Park opened up a chocolate shop in Washington, D.C., they couldn't wait to share their gourmet sweets with their friends and family. Unfortunately, Ginger's son, Justin, was born with severe food allergies, and even visiting the shop made Justin sick. Far from discouraged, Ginger and Frances vowed they would find alternatives for

Overview

When sisters Ginger and Frances Park opened up a chocolate shop in Washington, D.C., they couldn't wait to share their gourmet sweets with their friends and family. Unfortunately, Ginger's son, Justin, was born with severe food allergies, and even visiting the shop made Justin sick. Far from discouraged, Ginger and Frances vowed they would find alternatives for Justin that tasted better than the real thing. Inspired by their mission, Frances and Ginger wrote Allergies, Away!, a fun and healthy cookbook chock full of recipes for the millions of parents whose children have food allergies. This book features more than seventy recipes for kid-friendly foods like Seoulful Half-Moon Dumplings, Rock Star Onion Rings, and Orange Chocolate Muffins, and every recipe is free of dairy, nuts, and eggs. The recipes are easy enough to make with children, and Frances and Ginger include helpful tips for maximum fun in the kitchen. Perfect for parents who are sick of making bland and boring food for their allergic kids, Allergies, Away! is the ultimate guide to tasty, homemade food that is also allergen-free.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A great compilation of mom-tested recipes for tackling a surprise food allergy diagnosis. . . . Delivers convenient, kid-friendly recipes to ensure a seamless transition for families with food allergies.” —Alisa Fleming, founder of GoDairyFree.org and author of Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook

“Sweet and heartfelt, a conscientious book written with a mother's love. The personal allergy updates make the book relatable and comforting to any family, especially those newly diagnosed and facing life with a child with life-threatening food allergies.” —Elizabeth Gordon, author of Allergy-Free Desserts

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250030306
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
05/07/2013
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
1,230,288
File size:
1 MB

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Allergies, Away!

Creative Eats and Mouthwatering Treats for Kids Allergic to Nuts, Dairy, and Eggs


By Ginger Park, Frances Park

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2013 Ginger Park and Frances Park
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-250-03030-6



CHAPTER 1

PERSONAL NOTE AND PREFERENCES


Our recipes tend to contain lower sodium than others, by choice. Our father's untimely death at age fifty-six was caused by hypertension, so we've always been conscious of our sodium intake. For example, we don't add salt to pasta water or sprinkle it on at every stage of the cooking process. Truly, we don't believe it's necessary and it only fuels an unnatural desire for more salt.

Also, when cooking, brand names selection is a personal preference. Ours include:

Soy Milk: Silk Soy Milk

Soy Creamer: Silk Soy Creamer

Soy Butter: Earth Balance Soy Butter

Vegan Cheese: Daiya Cheddar Style, Mozzarella Style and Pepper Jack Shreds

Dairy-free Semi-sweet Chocolate Chips: Enjoy Life Semi-sweet Mini Chips

Non-dairy Sour Cream: Tofutti Better Than Sour Cream

Non-dairy Cream Cheese: Tofutti Better Than Cream Cheese

Vegan Mayonnaise: Vegenaise

Bread Crumbs: Ian's Original Panko Breadcrumbs (note: to our knowledge, only the "Original" is dairy-free)

Shortening: Spectrum Organic All Vegetable Shortening (non- hydrogenated)


ALLERGY REPORT 1999

AGE: ONE


Justin's first visit to the allergist's office confirmed that it would not be his last. That day, a skin prick test was performed on his forearm. The skin was gently scratched and a minute amount of milk protein was placed into the shallow scratch. Seconds later, a giant red wheal appeared, indicating a severe allergy. It was hard to feel optimistic but we tried.

"So it's just hives we have to worry about, right?" Ginger asked.

The allergist explained to us that Justin's first exposure to dairy caused hives, but the second reaction could very well be more severe. He went on to tell us that the first reaction to an allergen isn't always indicative of a second reaction because sometimes the immune system creates a protein called an antibody that works against a particular food. However, the second exposure to the allergen could very well result in an anaphylactic reaction due to the body releasing chemicals, including histamines, that attack the vital organs.

The allergist asked us if we suspected any other food culprits and Ginger told him that once, after she ate some peanuts, Justin broke out in hives. It was time for more skin testing that revealed more bad news. The list of foods that were possibly life-threatening for Justin turned out to be staggering: dairy, nuts, eggs, sesame, and a host of etceteras. His seasonal allergies fared no better: tree pollen, grasses, ragweed. The antihistamine Atarax was prescribed, along with an EpiPen — short for "Epinephrine Injection" — an auto-injector that helps stop a life-threatening reaction, in case he ever went into anaphylactic shock. Wherever Justin went, so did his medicine bag, stuffed with the likes of Atarax, EpiPen, and Benadryl.

Ginger was a wreck, but she took comfort that the odds were good that Justin might, in time, beat his dairy allergy. After all, his allergist had informed us that 75 percent of children outgrew it by their fifth birthday. So there was hope.

For now, anyway, our chocolate shop was Justin's hazard zone; a mere whiff of chocolate-covered peanuts seemed to make him break out in hives. So much for the proverbial kid in a candy store! Our dream of "breaking chocolate truffles" with our little guy was just that — a dream for now. But we were counting the days.

Up until his second year of preschool, Ginger coasted in the kitchen, serving Justin baked chicken, rice or potatoes, and steamed veggies — bland but supernutritious meals — while we waited for a day we prayed would come, when Justin outgrew his food allergies. In the meantime, a certain reality hovered over her like a slowly darkening sky: What would happen once Justin graduated from half-day preschool to all-day kindergarten? What would he eat for lunch?

Apron on, Ginger began experimenting like a mad foodie with dairy-free, nut-free, and egg-free recipes. In her test kitchen, some dishes were admittedly duds, but others were delicious. Who knew fluffy pancakes were possible when you substituted milk and eggs with rice milk and applesauce? Who knew tofu could replace ricotta cheese in an Italian dish? Deprived? Forget about it! Justin was getting nourishment in every sense of the word. With a Hearty Homemade Wheat Bread sandwich tucked in his lunch box, a slice of chocolate chip cake for a party, and Best Beef Stroganoff for supper, his world just got a little brighter.

Sigh.


YUMMY STARTERS

Whether just walking in from a game of tennis or studying for a test, Justin's tummy is always growling long before mealtime. The solution? Starters that are not only hearty, but also "yummy-licious." We don't do a lot of fried cooking, but our starters that sizzle in the pan are worth the guilt. Terrific for tiding over Justin's ever-growing appetite, these can also be mix and matched for a perfectly eclectic meal. Pair Seoulful Half-Moon Dumplings with Mini Potato and Bacon Bites or Scallion 'n' Squash Pancakes with Zesty White Bean Dip with Veggies Galore. Why not?


Seoulful Half-Moon Dumplings

Born from Korean dumplings called mandoo, these were inspired by the many platters we made with our mom when we were kids. Her job was to fill a big bowl with diced veggies — cabbage, onion, carrot — along with tofu, ground beef, garlic, sesame oil and seeds, and seasonings so savory and fragrant you just wanted to dig in, which we did, with our hands. Our job was to squish the mixture together until it looked like a giant meatball. After rimming a wonton wrapper with egg wash, the next step was to dollop a small teaspoon of the filling mixture into the wonton center, fold into a triangle, and seal the edges. The art of dimpling the wonton shut was the fun part. Ta-da!

Making dumplings for Justin is just as fun, and when he re-enacts our role of yore — squishing, rimming, dolloping, folding, pressing, dimpling — we grow nostalgic. Neither sesame oil nor sesame seeds are used in this recipe; and the wonton wrappers are sealed with water, not egg wash. But take our word for it, no flavor is sacrificed. Thank goodness our mom, long retired from cooking, is still here to enjoy all the dumplings we make.

Note: The eggless, round wonton wrappers can be found at any Asian market.


DIPPING SAUCE

2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon white or rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon water
¼ teaspoon sugar
Freshly ground black pepper


DUMPLINGS

4 garlic cloves
1 onion
2 large zucchini
½ pound lean ground beef (90/10) or ground chicken breast meat
8 ounces firm tofu
2 teaspoons fresh ginger, peeled and minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

One 16-ounce package eggless, round wonton wrappers
Canola oil, for panfrying


Whisk together all of the ingredients for the dipping sauce. Set aside.

In a food processor, pulse the garlic, onions, and zucchini; transfer to a large bowl. Add the ground beef or chicken, tofu, ginger, soy, salt and pepper and mix by hand.

Line a baking sheet with wax paper. Brush or dip half of each wonton wrapper (on one side) into a small bowl of water, then place a rounded teaspoon of the filling into the center. Fold over the wonton to make a half-moon, seal, then dimple shut. Thinly coat a skillet with 1 tablespoon of canola oil and place over medium heat. Place 10 dumplings in the skillet. When things get sizzling, add 2 tablespoons of water and cover with a lid. Cook about 4 minutes on each side, or until golden brown. Repeat to make the rest of the dumplings.

Yields about 50 dumplings


DUMPLING OPTIONS

Vegetarian Option: For a vegetarian version, add one cup broccoli florets to other veggies in the food processor and substitute an extra 8 ounces of firm tofu for the meat (total tofu for the recipe will be 16 ounces). When we make these for Francie (a vegetarian), she doesn't share!


Steam Option: Set a single layer of dumplings in a steamer, coated with vegetable spray, over a pot of water. Once the water is boiling, steam the dumplings for 15 to 20 minutes.


Freezer Friendly: We always make a hundred dumplings at a time and freeze the dumplings we don't cook in ziplock freezer bags. They are good in the freezer for up to 2 months.


Mini Potato and Bacon Bites

Ginger's favorite hobby is playing tennis, and when Justin is not taking lessons at the local club, he often joins her on the court. At a recent tennis party Ginger was hosting, her friend Sue brought over a platter of bite-size potato and bacon appetizers. They were gobbled up so fast, Ginger only got one. Yummy.

Since Justin loves potatoes and bacon, and since he is always ravenous after playing tennis, Ginger thought they would make a perfect postgame snack for him. Putting her own spin on Sue's recipe, she went for this sure-fire winner.

12 small potatoes
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ cup vegan mayonnaise
½ cup shredded vegan cheddar cheese
½ cup shredded vegan mozzarella cheese
½ pound bacon, cooked and crumbled
½ cup scallions, minced
2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil (or 2 teaspoons dried)


Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Rub the potatoes with olive oil, and place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 45 minutes, or until fork-tender. Cool the potatoes.

Cut the potatoes in half, then slice a thin sliver from the bottom of each to help them stand. Scoop out the potato pulp, leaving about a ¼-inch shell around the sides. Reserve the pulp.

Stir together the reserved potato pulp, vegan mayonnaise, vegan cheeses, bacon, scallions, and basil. Spoon mixture equally among the potato shells.

Broil for 3 to 5 minutes until lightly browned. Serve warm.

Yields 24 bites


Tzatziki

Our shop manager, fondly known as "Koomo," was planning to spend the Fourth of July with us at Ginger's house. Of Greek descent, Koomo had been telling us all week long he was preparing "a surprise" Justin could enjoy. He was especially excited because the surprise would include some of his homegrown cucumbers.

On the Fourth, Koomo came over toting pita chips and veggie sticks, along with a bowl of something creamy-looking. "It's tzatziki," he pronounced, proudly.

An aromatic Greek yogurt dip chock-full of garlic and cucumber, Koomo had simply substituted soy yogurt for the usual dairy yogurt. Given its pungent nature, we were thrilled that Justin was willing to dip a pita chip into the tzatziki.

"It's good."

But Ginger could read Justin's mind. Something's missing. There are times when simple substitutions just won't do the trick. While soy yogurt is great, it doesn't quite possess the same creaminess as dairy yogurt. The next day in the test kitchen we combined non-dairy soy yogurt and non-dairy sour cream, which is as creamy as the real stuff ... and voilà! It worked like magic! After one bite, Justin was spellbound and exclaimed: "It's unbelievable!"

1 cup soy yogurt
1 cup non-dairy sour cream
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon white vinegar
3 garlic cloves, minced
½ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 medium cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and diced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill
A few sprigs of fresh dill, for garnish (optional)


In a medium bowl, combine the soy yogurt and non-dairy sour cream. Set aside. In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, vinegar, garlic, salt, and pepper and mix well with a fork. Add the olive oil mixture to the yogurt–sour cream mixture and mix until creamy. Add the cucumber and chopped fresh dill. Garnish with sprigs of fresh dill, if desired. Chill for 2 hours before serving.

Enjoy this with dairy-free pita wedges or chips, toasted French bread, and veggie sticks. Delicious as a sandwich spread, too!

Yields 3 cups dip

Note: Tzatziki tastes even better if you let the flavors meld together overnight in the refrigerator. Garnish with dill, if using, just before serving.


Tater and Chive Cakes

With crackers, chives, and a quick stir, leftover mashed potatoes can easily morph into these Tater and Chive Cakes, so irresistible we gobble up most of them straight off the griddle. Sometimes the joy of cooking is truly the joy of cooking, and what a party we have! The few cakes that make it to the dinner table are for Justin's dad and grandmother — by then, we're so full we can't look at another one!

3 large potatoes, peeled and sliced
½ cup soy milk
3 tablespoons soy butter
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 cups crushed Original Premium Saltines or Whole Foods 365 Crackers or any other similar dairy-free crackers
2 garlic cloves, minced
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ cup finely chopped fresh chives, 1 tablespoon reserved for the non-dairy sour cream
Canola oil, for panfrying
1 cup non-dairy sour cream


Place potatoes in a large pot of cold water and bring to a boil. Cook until soft. Drain the potatoes and transfer to a mixing bowl. Add soy milk, soy butter, and salt. Using an electric mixer, whip the ingredients together until combined. Add the crackers, garlic, pepper, and chives and hand mix well.

Preheat a skillet, thinly coated with canola oil, over medium-high heat. Form 2½-inch patties and fry for about 3 minutes per side, or until golden brown. Whip the reserved chives into the non-dairy sour cream and serve on the side.

Yields about 30 cakes


Zesty White Bean Dip with Veggies Galore

One night during the holidays, we were all invited to dinner at our brother Sam's house where the spread of hors d'oeuvre was a mile long. Justin asked his aunt Francie about the creamy dip next to the pita chips.

"That's hummus, honey."

"Can I have some?"

Like most kids with nut allergies, Justin has to avoid legumes as well, including lentils, peas, and the culprit here, chickpeas.

"No, Justin. Sorry." To his brave nod, she added, "But I bet your mom can whip up something just as tasty."

"Really?"

Fortunately, the earth is populated with many beans Justin can eat — kidney beans, black beans, pinto beans, to name a few — so a bean dip seemed like a natural fit. Made with white beans, lemon juice, and a touch of vegan mayo, Ginger's alternative to hummus is healthy, high in protein, and disappears before your eyes.

One 15- to 16-ounce can cannellini beans, drained
1 garlic clove, minced
1/8 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 sprigs fresh dill
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper


In a food processor, pulse the beans, garlic, olive oil, vegan mayo, lemon juice, and dill together until creamy. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with veggies. This is also great with dairy-free pita wedges, tortilla chips, water crackers, and wheat toast.

Yields 1 cup dip


Scallion 'n' Squash Pancakes

With the exception of sesame and egg, Korean dishes are often free of high-allergy foods. In our Scallion 'n' Squash Pancakes recipe, cornstarch replaces egg, and of course you won't see any sign of sesame oil or seeds. Considered an appetizer, these pancakes are crispy on the outside, moist and chewy on the inside, and so irresistible they're prone to trump the rest of the meal. Sometimes we make entrée portions and serve with a side of rice.


DIPPING SAUCE

2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon white or rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon water
¼ teaspoon sugar
Freshly ground black pepper


PANCAKES

1 cup all-purpose flour, presifted
2 tablespoons cornstarch
½ cup water plus 4 tablespoon water
2 scallions, sliced into 2-inch-long pieces
¼ cup grated green squash
¾ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
Canola oil, for panfrying


Whisk together all of the ingredients for the dipping sauce. Set aside.

With a large spoon, mix together all of the ingredients except for the canola oil. Preheat a large skillet with the oil over medium-high heat. Make 3 pancakes at a time, using ¼ cup of batter per pancake. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until the edges turn lightly golden brown and crispy. Serve immediately with the dipping sauce.

Yields 6 pancakes


ALLERGY REPORT 2001

AGE: THREE


The moment of truth had arrived: Justin was ready to be tested again. With hope in our hearts, we had diligently followed his allergist's guidelines by avoiding Justin's food allergens the past two years. Perhaps by now, he was allergy-free.

Wishful thinking.

Along with milk, Justin was skin-prick tested for seventeen other allergens, including peanuts, eggs, soy, dogs, cats, dust mites, corn, sesame, oak, and grass. He was a very unhappy camper, weeping each time they pricked his tiny back. It was difficult to watch him go through this agony at his tender age, and so unfair. Like his previous tests, within seconds, each prick resulted in a red wheal, some bigger than others. By the end of the test, his back was covered with seventeen wheals. Once again, he was labeled a severely allergic child. The only non-allergic or negative reaction was to horse dander.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Allergies, Away! by Ginger Park, Frances Park. Copyright © 2013 Ginger Park and Frances Park. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Sisters GINGER and FRANCES PARK are co-owners of the chocolate shop Chocolate Chocolate in Washington, D.C. They are the authors of Chocolate, Chocolate, which was also published by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press. Ginger's son, Justin, suffers from severe food allergies, and he was the inspiration for this cookbook.


FRANCES PARK co-owns of the chocolate shop Chocolate Chocolate in Washington, D.C with her sister Ginger. They are the authors of Chocolate, Chocolate, which was also published by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press. Ginger's son, Justin, suffers from severe food allergies, and he was the inspiration for this cookbook.
GINGER PARK co-owns of the chocolate shop Chocolate Chocolate in Washington, D.C with her sister Frances. They are the authors of Chocolate, Chocolate, which was also published by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press. Ginger's son, Justin, suffers from severe food allergies, and he was the inspiration for this cookbook.

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