Allied Looting in World War II: Thefts of Art, Manuscripts, Stamps and Jewelry in Europe

Overview

Looting has long been recognized as one of the crimes committed by the Third Reich during World War II, a crime which stripped economic wealth and artistic treasures from the populations the Nazis terrorized. This historical text reveals the shocking extent of looting by Allied forces, exploring their thievery against the Germans and others. It follows the journey of the Hungarian Crown Treasure from a muddy oil drum in Austria to Fort Knox and back to Hungary, and discusses numerous lost treasures ranging from ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (1) from $72.61   
  • Used (1) from $72.61   
Sending request ...

Overview

Looting has long been recognized as one of the crimes committed by the Third Reich during World War II, a crime which stripped economic wealth and artistic treasures from the populations the Nazis terrorized. This historical text reveals the shocking extent of looting by Allied forces, exploring their thievery against the Germans and others. It follows the journey of the Hungarian Crown Treasure from a muddy oil drum in Austria to Fort Knox and back to Hungary, and discusses numerous lost treasures ranging from priceless art works to rare manuscripts, including the earliest known printing by the Gutenberg press.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786460533
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/14/2011
  • Pages: 300
  • Sales rank: 1,411,397
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Kenneth D. Alford is an internationally recognized historical consultant for television productions involving Nazi looting and is the author of several books. Retired from a career in banking, he lives in Richmond, Virginia.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vi

Foreword Sidney D. Kirkpatrick 1

Introduction 3

Part I Stealing a Trove of Stamps

1 The 273rd Infantry Regiment 7

2 The Looting of Anton Wiede 13

3 The Investigation 19

Part II A Passion for Lucas Cranach Paintings

4 Donovan Senter's Early Days 33

5 The Counter Intelligence Corps 40

6 The Quest for Lucas Cranach Paintings 47

7 The Charade Continues 59

8 Unanswered Questions 71

Part III Plundering Priceless Manuscripts

9 The Capture of Bad Wildungen 79

10 Lieutenant Bud Berman 85

11 The Rare Book Dealer 91

12 The Papal Countess 96

13 Other Bad Wildungen Robberies 102

Part IV The Schwarzburg Castle

14 The Robbery 109

15 A Break in the Case 117

16 Churchill "Chuck" Jones Brazelton 122

17 The Nun and the Poster 135

Part V Vignettes of Looting

18 The Gravediggers Pillage Reutti, Germany 141

19 The U.N. Red Cross Robbery 146

20 The Rabbi's Egyptian Ring 149

21 Frederick the Great's Handwritten Manuscript 153

22 Berlin Central Archives 157

23 The Golden Book of Saarbr├╝cken 162

24 The Priceless Mainz Psalter 166

25 Raphael's Portrait of a Young Man 170

26 Clara Elisabeth Hertling 180

Part VI Looting from Hungary in World War II

27 Hungary 189

28 The Hungarian National Bank's Gold and Silver Reserves 191

29 The Acquisition of the Hungarian Crown Treasure 201

30 The Gold Treasure of Kremsm├╝nster 211

31 Cardinal Mindszenty 214

32 The Return of Saint Stephen's Crown 221

33 The Hungarian Gold Train 227

34 The American Army Takes Custody 232

35 The General's Kingdom 235

36 The End of the Gold Train Property 239

Appendix A Anton Wiede's Missing Stamps and Paintings 245

Appendix B The Missing Kaltenbrunner Treasure 248

Appendix C Thefts from the Weimar National Art Collections 251

Appendix D Otto v. Falke's Description of the Crown of Saint Stephen 254

Chapter Notes 259

Bibliography 269

Index 271

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)