Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, The, Brief Edition / Edition 6

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Overview

Solidly grounded in current theory and research, yet eminently practical and teachable, The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing has set the standard for first-year composition courses in writing, reading, critical thinking, and inquiry.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205823154
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 1/13/2011
  • Series: MyCompLab Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 704
  • Sales rank: 371,872
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

DETAILED CONTENTS

Writing Projects

Thematic Contents

Preface

PART 1: A RHETORIC FOR WRITERS

1 THINKING RHETORICALLY ABOUT GOOD WRITING

CONCEPT 1 Good writing can vary from closed to open forms.

David Rockwood, A Letter to the Editor

Thomas Merton, A Festival of Rain

Distinctions between Closed and Open Forms of Writing

Where to Place Your Writing along the Continuum

CONCEPT 2 Good writers address problems rather than topics.

Shared Problems Unite Writers and Readers

Where Do Problems Come From?

CONCEPT 3 Good writers think rhetorically about purpose, audience, and genre.

What Is Rhetoric?

How Writers Think about Purpose

How Writers Think about Audience

How Writers Think about Genre

Chapter Summary

BRIEF WRITING PROJECT 1 TWO MESSAGES FOR DIFFERENT PURPOSES, AUDIENCES, AND GENRES

*BRIEF WRITING PROJECT 2 A LETTER TO YOUR PROFESSOR ABOUT WHAT WAS NEW IN CHAPTER 1

2 THINKING RHETORICALLY ABOUT YOUR SUBJECT MATTER

CONCEPT 4 To determine their thesis, writers must often “wallow in complexity.”

Learning to Wallow in Complexity

Seeing Each Academic Discipline as a Field of Inquiry and Argument

Using Exploratory Writing to Help You Wallow in Complexity

Believing and Doubting Paul Theroux’s Negative View of Sports

CONCEPT 5 A strong thesis statement surprises readers with something new or challenging.

Trying to Change Your Reader’s View of Your Subject

Giving Your Thesis Tension through “Surprising Reversal”

CONCEPT 6 In closed-form prose, a typical introduction starts with the problem, not the thesis.

A Protypical Introduction

Features of a Good Introduction

CONCEPT 7 Thesis statements in closed-form prose are supported hierarchically with points and particulars.

How Points Convert Information to Meaning

How Removing Particulars Creates a Summary

How to Use Points and Particulars When You Revise

Chapter Summary

BRIEF WRITING PROJECT PLAYING THE BELIEVING AND DOUBTING GAME

3 THINKING RHETORICALLY ABOUT HOW MESSAGES PERSUADE

CONCEPT 8 Messages persuade through their angle of vision.

Recognizing the Angle of Vision in a Text

Analyzing Angle of Vision

CONCEPT 9 Messages persuade through appeals to logos,

ethos, and pathos.

CONCEPT 10 Nonverbal messages persuade through visual strategies that

can be analyzed rhetorically.

Visual Rhetoric

The Rhetoric of Clothing and Other Consumer Items

Chapter Summary

BRIEF WRITING PROJECT ANALYZING ANGLE OF VISION IN TWO PASSAGES ABOUT NUCLEAR ENERGY

4 THINKING RHETORICALLY ABOUT STYLE AND DOCUMENT DESIGN

CONCEPT 11 Good writers make purposeful stylistic choices.

Factors That Affect Style

Four Powerful Strategies for Improving Your Style

CONCEPT 12 Good writers make purposeful document

design choices.

Document Design for Manuscripts and Papers

Document Design for Published Works

Chapter Summary

BRIEF WRITING PROJECT TWO CONTRASTING DESCRIPTIONS OF THE SAME SCENE

PART 2: WRITING PROJECTS

WRITING TO LEARN

5 READING RHETORICALLY: THE WRITER AS STRONG READER

Exploring Rhetorical Reading

*Michael Pollan, Why Bother?

Understanding Rhetorical Reading

What Makes College-Level Reading Difficult?

Using the Reading Strategies of Experts

Reading with the Grain and Against the Grain

Understanding Summary Writing

Usefulness of Summaries

The Demands that Summary Writing Makes on Writers

*Summary of “Why Bother?”

Understanding Strong Response Writing

Strong Response as Rhetorical Critique

Strong Response as Ideas Critique

Strong Response as Reflection

Strong Response as a Blend

*Kyle Madsen (student), Can a Green Thumb Save the Planet? A Response to Michael Pollan

WRITING PROJECT A SUMMARY

Generating Ideas: Reading for Structure and Content

Drafting and Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT A SUMMARY/STRONG RESPONSE ESSAY

Exploring Ideas for Your Strong Response

Writing a Thesis for a Strong Response Essay

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Thomas L. Friedman, 30 Little Turtles

Stephanie Malinowski (student), Questioning Thomas L. Friedman’s Optimism in “30 Little Turtles”

David Horsey, Today’s Economic Indicator (editorial cartoon)

Mike Lane, Labor Day Blues (editorial cartoon)

Froma Harrop, New Threat to Skilled U.S. Workers

WRITING TO EXPLORE

6 WRITING AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NARRATIVE

Exploring Autobiographical Narrative

Understanding Autobiographical Writing

Autobiographical Tension: The Opposition of Contraries

How Literary Elements Work in Autobiographical Narratives

WRITING PROJECT AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NARRATIVE

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting Your Narrative

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT LITERACY NARRATIVE

What Is a Literacy Narrative?

Typical Features of a Literacy Narrative

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting Your Literacy Narrative

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Kris Saknussemm, Phantom Limb Pain

Patrick José (student), No Cats in America?

*Stephanie Whipple (student), One Great Book

7 WRITING AN EXPLORATORY ESSAY OR ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Exploring Exploratory Writing

Understanding Exploratory Writing

WRITING PROJECT AN EXPLORATORY ESSAY

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Taking “Double-Entry” Research Notes

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

What Is an Annotated Bibliography?

Features of Annotated Bibliography Entries

Examples of Annotation Entries

Writing a Critical Preface for Your Annotated Bibliography

Shaping, Drafting, and Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

James Gardiner (student), How Do Online Social Networks Affect Communication?

James Gardiner (student), What Is the Effect of Online Social Networks on Communication Skills? An Annotated Bibliography

WRITING TO INFORM

8 WRITING AN INFORMATIVE (AND SURPRISING) ESSAY OR REPORT

Exploring Informative (and Surprising) Writing

EnchantedLearning.com, Tarantulas

Rod Crawford, Myths about “Dangerous” Spiders

Understanding Informative Writing

Informative Reports

Informative Essay Using the Surprising-Reversal Strategy

WRITING PROJECT INFORMATIVE REPORT

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT INFORMATIVE ESSAY USING THE SURPRISING-REVERSAL STRATEGY

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping, Drafting, and Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Pew Research Center, Muslim Americans: Middle Class and Mostly Mainstream

Kerri Ann Matsumoto (student), How Much Does It Cost to Go Organic?

Shannon King (student), How Clean and Green Are Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Cars?

Eugene Robinson, You Have the Right to Remain a Target of Racial Profiling

WRITING TO ANALYZE AND SYNTHESIZE

9 ANALYZING FIELD RESEARCH DATA

Exploring the Analysis of Field Research Data

Understanding the Analysis of Field Research Data

The Structure of an Empirical Research Report

How Readers Typically Read a Research Report

Posing Your Research Question

Collecting Data through Observation, Interviews, or Questionnaires

Reporting Your Results in Both Words and Graphics

Analyzing Your Results

Following Ethical Standards

WRITING PROJECT AN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH REPORT

Generating Ideas for Your Empirical Research Report

Designing Your Empirical Study and Drafting the Introduction and Method Sections

Doing the Research and Writing the Rest of the Report

Revising Your Report

Questions for Peer Review

Writing in Teams

WRITING PROJECT A SCIENTIFIC POSTER

What Is a Scientific Poster?

Content and Features of a Poster

Designing, Creating, and Revising Your Poster

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Gina Escamilla, Angie L. Cradock, and Ichiro Kawachi,Women and Smoking in Hollywood Movies: A Content Analysis

Lauren Campbell, Charlie Bourain, and Tyler Nishida (students), A Comparison of Gender Stereotypes in SpongeBob SquarePants and a 1930s Mickey Mouse Cartoon (APA-Style Research Paper)

Lauren Campbell, Charlie Bourain, and Tyler Nishida (students), SpongeBob SquarePants Has Fewer Gender Stereotypes than Mickey Mouse (scientific poster)

10 ANALYZING IMAGES

Exploring Image Analysis

*Understanding Image Analysis: Documentary and News Photographs

Angle of Vision and Credibility of Photographs

How to Analyze a Documentary Photograph

Sample Analysis of a Documentary Photograph

*Understanding Image Analysis: Paintings

How to Analyze a Painting

Sample Analysis of a Painting

*Understanding Image Analysis:Advertisements

How Advertisers Think about Advertising

Mirrors and Windows:The Strategy of an Effective Advertisement

How to Analyze an Advertisement

Sample Analysis of an Advertisement

WRITING PROJECT ANALYSIS OF TWO VISUAL TEXTS

Exploring and Generating Ideas for Your Analysis

Shaping and Drafting Your Analysis

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

*Clark Hoyt, Face to Face with Tragedy

*Manoucheka Celeste, Disturbing Media Images of Haiti Earthquake Aftermath Tell Only Part of the Story

*Lydia Wheeler (student), Two Photographs Capture Women’s Economic Misery

11 ANALYZING A SHORT STORY

Exploring Literary Analysis

Evelyn Dahl Reed, The Medicine Man

Understanding Literary Analysis

The Truth of Literary Events

Writing (about) Literature

WRITING PROJECT AN ANALYSIS OF A SHORT STORY

Reading the Story and Using Reading Logs

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping, Drafting, and Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Alice Walker, Everyday Use (For Your Grandmama)

Betsy Weiler (student), Who Do You Want to Be?: Finding Heritage in Walker’s “Everyday Use”

12 ANALYZING AND SYNTHESIZING IDEAS

Exploring the Analysis and Synthesis of Ideas

Nikki Swartz, Mobile Phone Tracking Scrutinized

Terry J. Allen, Reach Out and Track Someone

Understanding Analysis and Synthesis

Posing a Synthesis Question

Synthesis Writing as an Extension of Summary/Strong Response Writing

Student Example of a Synthesis Essay

Kate MacAulay (student), Technology’s Peril and Potential

WRITING PROJECT A SYNTHESIS ESSAY

Ideas for Synthesis Questions and Readings

Using Learning Logs

Exploring Your Texts through Summary Writing

Exploring Your Texts’ Rhetorical Strategies

Exploring Main Themes and Similarities and Differences in Your Texts’ Ideas

Generating Ideas of Your Own

Taking Your Position in the Conversation: Your Synthesis

Shaping and Drafting

Writing a Thesis for a Synthesis Essay

Organizing a Synthesis Essay

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Dee, Comprehensive Immigration Reform: PROs and ANTIs

Byron Williams, Immigration Frenzy Points Out Need for Policy Debate

Victor Davis Hanson, The Global Immigration Problem

Mike Crapo, Immigration Policy Must Help Economy While Preserving Ideals

Trapper John, The Progressive Case Against the Immigration Bill

WRITING TO PERSUADE

13 WRITING A CLASSICAL ARGUMENT

What Is Argument?

Exploring Classical Argument

Understanding Classical Argument

Stages of Development: Your Growth as an Arguer

Creating an Argument Frame: A Claim with Reasons

Articulating Reasons

Articulating Underlying Assumptions

Using Evidence Effectively

Evaluating Evidence: The STAR Criteria

Addressing Objections and Counterarguments

Responding to Objections, Counterarguments, and Alternative Views

Seeking Audience-Based Reasons

Appealing to Ethos and Pathos

A Brief Primer on Informal Fallacies

WRITING PROJECT A CLASSICAL ARGUMENT

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Ross Taylor (student), Paintball: Promoter of Violence or Healthy Fun?

William Sweet, Why Uranium Is the New Green

Stan Eales, Welcome to Sellafield (editorial cartoon)

Los Angeles Times, No to Nukes

Leonard Pitts, Jr., Spare the Rod, Spoil the Parenting

A. J. Chavez (student), The Case for (Gay) Marriage

14 MAKING AN EVALUATION

Exploring Evaluative Writing

Understanding Evaluation Arguments

The Criteria-Match Process

The Role of Purpose and Context in Determining Criteria

Special Problems in Establishing Criteria

Distingushing Necessary, Sufficient, and Accidental Criteria

Using a Planning Schema to Develop Evaluation Arguments

Conducting an Evaluation Argument:An Extended Example

WRITING PROJECT AN EVALUATION ARGUMENT

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

Jackie Wyngaard (student), EMP: Music History or Music Trivia?

Diane Helman and Phyllis Bookspan, Sesame Street: Brought to You by the Letters M-A-L-E

Teresa Filice (student), Parents: The Anti-Drug: A Useful Site

15 PROPOSING A SOLUTION

Exploring Proposal Writing

Understanding Proposal Writing

Special Problems of Proposal Arguments

Developing an Effective Justification Section

Proposals as Visual Arguments and PowerPoint Presentations

WRITING PROJECT A PROPOSAL ARGUMENT

Generating and Exploring Ideas

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT ADVOCACY AD OR POSTER

Using Document Design Features

Exploring and Generating Ideas

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

WRITING PROJECT PROPOSAL SPEECH WITH VISUAL AIDS

Developing, Shaping, and Outlining Your Proposal Speech

Designing Your Visual Aids

Slide Titles: Using Points, Not Topics

*Student Example of a Speech Outline and Slides

*Sam Rothchild (student), Reward Work Not Wealth (oral presentation with visual aids)

Delivering Your Speech

Revising

Questions for Peer Review

READINGS

*Lucy Morsen (student), A Proposal to Improve the Campus Learning Environment by Banning Laptops and Cell Phones from Class

Jennifer Allen, The Athlete on the Sidelines

Dylan Fujitani (student), “The Hardest of the Hardcore”: Let’s Outlaw Hired Guns in Contemporary American Warfare

PART 3: A GUIDE TO COMPOSING AND REVISING

16 WRITING AS A PROBLEM-SOLVING PROCESS

SKILL 16.1 Follow the experts’ practice of using multiple drafts.

Why Expert Writers Revise So Extensively

An Expert’s Writing Processes Are Recursive

SKILL 16.2 Revise globally as well as locally.

SKILL 16.3 Develop ten expert habits to improve your writing processes.

SKILL 16.4 Use peer reviews to help you think like an expert.

Becoming a Helpful Reader of Classmates’ Drafts

Using a Generic Peer Review Guide

Participating in Peer Review Workshops

Responding to Peer Reviews

17 COMPOSING AND REVISING CLOSED-FORM PROSE

SKILL 17.1 Understand reader expectations.

Unity and Coherence

Old before New

Forecasting and Fulfillment

SKILL 17.2 Convert loose structures into thesis/support structures.

Avoiding And Then Writing, or Chronological Structure

Avoiding All About Writing, or Encyclopedic Structure

Avoiding Engfish Writing, or Structure without Surprise

SKILL 17.3 Plan and visualize your structure.

Making Lists of “Chunks” and a Scratch Outline Early in the Writing Process

“Nutshelling” Your Argument as an Aid to Finding a Structure

Articulating a Working Thesis with Main Points

Using Complete Sentences in Outlines to Convey Meanings

Sketching Your Structure Using an Outline,Tree Diagram, or Flowchart

Letting the Structure Evolve

SKILL 17.4 Set up reader expectations through effective titles and introductions.

Avoiding the “Topic Title” and the “Funnel Introduction”

Hooking Your Reader with an Effective Title

From Old to New: The General Principle of Closed-Form Introductions

Typical Elements of a Closed-Form Introduction

Forecasting the Whole with a Thesis Statement, Purpose Statement, or Blueprint Statement

SKILL 17.5 Create effective topic sentences for paragraphs.

Placing Topic Sentences at the Beginning of Paragraphs

Revising Paragraphs for Unity

Adding Particulars to Support Points

SKILL 17.6 Guide your reader with transitions and other signposts.

Using Common Transition Words to Signal Relationships

Writing Major Transitions between Parts

Signaling Major Transitions with Headings

SKILL 17.7 Bind sentences together by placing old information

before new information.

The Old/New Contract in Sentences

How to Make Links to the “Old”

Avoiding Ambiguous Use of “This” to Fulfill the Old/New Contract

SKILL 17.8 Learn four expert moves for organizing

and developing ideas.

The For Example Move

The Summary/However Move

The Division-into-Parallel Parts Move

The Comparison/Contrast Move

*SKILL 17.9 Use effective tables, graphs, and charts

to present numeric data.

How Tables Tell Many Stories

Using a Graphic to Tell a Story

Incorporating a Graphic into Your Essay

SKILL 17.10 Write effective conclusions.

18 COMPOSING AND REVISING OPEN-FORM PROSE

Key Features of Open-Form Prose

SKILL 18.1 Make your narrative a story, not an and then chronology.

Depiction of Events through Time

Connectedness

Tension or Conflict

Resolution, Recognition, or Retrospective Interpretation

SKILL 18.2 Write low on the ladder of abstraction.

Concrete Words Evoke Images and Sensations

Use Revelatory Words and Memory-Soaked Words

SKILL 18.3 Disrupt your reader’s desire for direction and clarity.

Disrupting Predictions and Making Odd Juxtapositions

Leaving Gaps

SKILL 18.4 Tap the power of figurative language.

SKILL 18.5 Expand your repertoire of styles.

SKILL 18.6 Use open-form elements to create “voice” in closed-form prose.

Introduce Some Humor

Use Techniques from Popular Magazines

PART 4: A RHETORICAL GUIDE TO RESEARCH

19 ASKING QUESTIONS, FINDING SOURCES

An Overview of Research Writing

Characteristics of a Good Research Paper

An Effective Approach to Research

The Role of Documentation in College Research

SKILL 19.1 Argue your own thesis in response to a research question.

Topic Focus Versus Question Focus

Formulating a Research Question

Establishing Your Role as a Researcher

A Case Study: James Gardiner’s Research on Online Social Networks

SKILL 19.2 Understand differences among kinds of sources.

Primary and Secondary Sources

Reading Secondary Sources Rhetorically

SKILL 19.3 Use purposeful strategies for searching libraries, databases, and web sites.

Checking Your Library’s Home Page 528

Finding Print Articles: Searching a Licensed Database 529

Illustration of a Database Search 531

Finding Cyberspace Sources: Searching the World Wide Web 533

20 EVALUATING SOURCES

SKILL 20.1 Read sources rhetorically and take purposeful notes.

Reading with Your Own Goals in Mind

Reading Your Sources Rhetorically

Taking Purposeful Notes

SKILL 20.2 Evaluate sources for reliability, credibility, angle of vision, and degree of advocacy.

Reliability

Credibility

Angle of Vision and Political Stance

Degree of Advocacy

SKILL 20.3 Use your rhetorical knowledge to evaluate web sources.

The Web as a Unique Rhetorical Environment

Criteria for Evaluating a Web Source

Analyzing Your Own Purposes for Using a Web Source

21 INCORPORATING SOURCES INTO YOUR OWN WRITING

Roger D. McGrath, The Myth of Violence in the Old West

SKILL 21.1 Let your own argument determine your use of sources.

Writer 1: An Analytical Paper on Causes of Violence in Contemporary Society

Writer 2: A Persuasive Paper Supporting Gun Control

Writer 3: An Informative Paper Showing Shifting Definitions of Crime

SKILL 21.2 Know when and how to use summary, paraphrase, and quotation.

Summarizing

Paraphrasing

Quoting

SKILL 21.3 Use attributive tags to distinguish your ideas from a source’s.

Attributive Tags Mark Where Source Material Starts and Ends

Attributive Tags Are Clearer than Parenthetical Citations

Attributive Tags Frame the Source Material Rhetorically

SKILL 21.4 Punctuate quotations correctly.

Quoting a Complete Sentence

Inserting Quoted Words and Phrases into Your Own Sentences

Modifying a Quotation

Omitting Something from a Quoted Passage

Quoting Something That Already Contains a Quotation

Using a Block Quotation for a Long Passage

*SKILL 21.5 Avoid plagiarism by following academic conventions for ethical use of sources.

Why Some Kinds of Plagiarism May Occur Unwittingly

Strategies for Avoiding Plagiarism

22 CITING AND DOCUMENTING SOURCES

*SKILL 22.1 Know what needs to be cited and what doesn’t.

SKILL 22.2 Understand the connection between in-text citations and the end-of-paper list of cited works.

SKILL 22.3 Cite and document sources using MLA style.

In-Text Citations in MLA Style 576

Works Cited List in MLA Style 579

MLA Citation Models 579

James Gardiner (student), Why Facebook Might Not Be Good for You (MLA-Style Research Paper)

SKILL 22.4 Cite and document sources using APA style.

In-Text Citations in APA Style

References List in APA Style

APA Citation Models

Student Example of an APA-Style Research Paper

PART 5: WRITING FOR ASSESSMENT

23 ESSAY EXAMINATIONS

How Essay Exams Differ from Other Essays

Preparing for an Exam: Learning Subject Matter

Identifying and Learning Main Ideas

Applying Your Knowledge

Making a Study Plan

Analyzing Exam Questions

Understanding the Use of Outside Quotations

Recognizing Organizational Cues

Interpreting Key Terms

Dealing with the Limits of the Test Situation

Producing an “A” Response

Chapter Summary

24 ESSAY EXAMINATIONS: WRITING WELL UNDER PRESSURE

How Essay Exams Differ from Other Essays

Preparing for an Exam: Learning Subject Matter

Identifying and Learning Main Ideas

Applying Your Knowledge

Making a Study Plan

Analyzing Exam Questions

Understanding the Use of Outside Quotations

Recognizing Organizational Cues

Interpreting Key Terms

Dealing with the Limits of the Test Situation

Producing an “A” Response

Chapter Summary

25 ASSEMBLING A PORTFOLIO AND WRITING A REFLECTIVE ESSAY

Understanding Portfolios

Collecting Work for Paper and Electronic Portfolios

Selecting Work for Your Portfolio

Understanding Reflective Writing

Why Is Reflective Writing Important?

Reflective Writing Assignments

Single Reflection Assignments

Guidelines for Writing a Single Reflection

Comprehensive Reflection Assignments

Guidelines for Writing a Comprehensive Reflection

Guidelines for Writing a Comprehensive Reflective Letter

Readings

Jaime Finger (student), “A Single Reflection on an Exploratory Essay”

Bruce Urbanik (student), “A Comprehensive Reflective Letter”

Acknowledgments

Index

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