Almost All Aliens: Immigration, Race, and Colonialism in American History and Identity / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$10.45
(Save 79%)
Est. Return Date: 10/28/2014
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $42.37
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 15%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $42.37   
  • New (7) from $42.37   
  • Used (4) from $59.95   

Overview

Almost All Aliens puts forward a unique reinterpretation of immigration in the history of the United States. Leaving behind the traditional melting-pot model of immigrant assimilation, Paul Spickard offers a fresh and provocative reconceptualization that embraces the multicultural reality of immigration that has always existed in America. With a far-reaching, authoritative narrative, the book analyzes the complex relationship between immigration, ethnic identity and race, slavery, and colonial expansion. Examining not only the lives of those who crossed the Atlantic, but also those who crossed the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the North American Borderlands, Almost All Aliens redefines the definitive history of immigration and identity in the United States from 1600 until the present.

About the Author:
Paul Spickard is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415935937
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 6/21/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 744
  • Sales rank: 377,024
  • Product dimensions: 6.69 (w) x 9.61 (h) x 1.45 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Spickard is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is co-author of Revealing the Sacred in Asian and Pacific America (Routledge 2003) and editor of Race and Nation: Ethnic Systems in the Modern World (Routledge 2004).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Preface

1 Immigration, Race, Ethnicity, Colonialism

Beyond Ellis Island—How Not to Think about Immigration History

Not Assimilation But Race Making

Words Matter

2. Colliding Peoples in Eastern North America, 1600—1780

In the Beginning There Were Indians

There Goes the Neighborhood: European Incursion and “Settlement”

A Mixed Multitude: European Migrants

Out of Africa

Merging Peoples, Blending Cultures

3 An Anglo-American Republic? Racial Citizenship,

1760—1860

Slavery and Antislavery in the Era of the American Revolution

Free White Persons: Defining Membership

Playing Indian: White Appropriations of Native American Symbols and Identities

European Immigrants

Issues in European Migration

Nativism

Were the Irish Ever Not White?

4 The Border Crossed Us: Euro-Americans Take the

Continent, 1830—1900

U.S. Colonial Expansion across North America

Taking the Mexican Northlands

Racial Replacement

East from Asia

Slave and Citizen

Colonialism and Race Making

5 The Great Wave, 1870—1930

From New Sources and Old, to America and Back

Making a Multiethnic Working Class in the West

6 Cementing Hierarchy: Issues and Interpretations,

1870—1930

How They Lived and Worked

Gender and Migration

Angles of Entry

Making Jim Crow in the South

Making Racial and Ethnic Hierarchy in the North

Empire and Race Making

Law, Race, and Immigration

Racialist Pseudoscience and Its Offspring

Anti-Immigrant Movements

Interpretive Issues

7 White People’s America, 1924—1965

Recruiting Citizens

Recruiting Guest Workers

Indians or Citizens?

World War II

Cracks in White Hegemony

Racial Fairness and the Immigration Act of 1965

8 New Migrants from New Places Since 1965

Some Migrants We Know

From Asia

From the Americas

From Europe

From Africa

Continuing Involvements Abroad

9 Redefining Membership Amid Multiplicity Since 1965

Immigration Reform, Again and Again

Panethnic Power

Disgruntled White People

New Issues in a New Era

10 Epilogue: Future Uncertain

Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration at the Dawn

of the Twenty-First Century

Projecting the Future

Immigration Issues

Reprise

Appendices

APPENDIX A:

Chronology of Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Decisions

APPENDIX B:

Tables

Notes

Illustration Permission Acknowledgments

Also by Paul Spickard

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)