Alone: Finding Connection in a Lonely World

Alone: Finding Connection in a Lonely World

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by Andy Braner
     
 

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Despite hundreds of Instagram friends and thousands of text messages, why do students feel so alone? It’s a sad irony that today’s students have never been more connected—and have never felt more isolated. Andy Braner believes the answer lies in showing students how to build real and lasting community that’s centered on God’s love and

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Overview

Despite hundreds of Instagram friends and thousands of text messages, why do students feel so alone? It’s a sad irony that today’s students have never been more connected—and have never felt more isolated. Andy Braner believes the answer lies in showing students how to build real and lasting community that’s centered on God’s love and grace. An important and essential read for parents and modern youth workers, Alone helps you learn how leading healthy students begins with a solid understanding of gospel community and mission.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781617479922
Publisher:
Tyndale House Publishers
Publication date:
10/15/2012
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
1,254,661
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 2.70(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author


Andy Braner is an ordained youth minister and former president of Kanakuk Colorado. Currently, he is the president of KIVU, a ministry that teaches Christian worldview principles to teens and college students in the context of outdoor adventures. Each year, Andy speaks to more than 80,000 teens and college students all over the world. His message centers around training global leaders to love God and others.

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Alone: Finding Connection in a Lonely World 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Nothing..." shifted into a wolf and slid into the shadows mysteriously. It was inobvious he was hiding something.