Alphabetter

Alphabetter

5.0 2
by Dan Bar-el, Graham Ross
     
 

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Did you ever try to use an egg in place of a football? Or dress up a live quail in doll's clothes when you didn't have a doll? Or strap rag-dolls onto your feet in place of slippers? In Alphabetter, twenty-six boys and girls find themselves in twenty-six different predicaments when the alphabet refuses to cooperate with them. In the end, the solution turns out

Overview

Did you ever try to use an egg in place of a football? Or dress up a live quail in doll's clothes when you didn't have a doll? Or strap rag-dolls onto your feet in place of slippers? In Alphabetter, twenty-six boys and girls find themselves in twenty-six different predicaments when the alphabet refuses to cooperate with them. In the end, the solution turns out to be right on the next page, if only they can find it...

Editorial Reviews

BC Parent Magazine
"An original alphabet book that is filled with fun preschool humour. Ross's illustrations capture the whimsical fun nature of the book and will have youngsters laughing out loud."
CM Magazine
"Indeed one of the better alphabet books. Highly recommended."
The Globe and Mail
"It is cleverness writ and painted large, and it's delivered with an infectious exuberance and cadence that manifests itself not just in the playful text, but also in illustrator Ross's quirky, kinetic characters."
Book Notes
"Appropriate for early elementary students who enjoy funny stories and look-and-find books."
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Bar-el and Ross meet the challenge of producing a different kind of alphabet book by presenting on each page a youngster whose name begins with a letter of the alphabet. He or she has something beginning with that letter but is missing something beginning with the next letter. So Alberto has an alligator, but no bathing suit. Benoit has a bathing suit but no clarinet, and so it goes. By the time we reach Zara, she really just wants a friend. This leads to a double page on which each character, from Zara back up the alphabet, gives the next person their desired item. Everyone ends up satisfied, except perhaps the alligator, who is off to the zoo. Ross picks up on the amusing possibilities by inventing a cast of comic characters and having them perform in odd ways: Hector gets his hammer from an ice cream vendor; Gwendolyn's goldfish hangs from her belt, along with an assortment of construction tools; Frieda feeds her football in its fishbowl, etc. Acrylic paints produce solid figures and props, while bits of collage spotlight some objects for contrast. The final display adds visual delights as its very small characters attend to their desires. There is even a letter hidden on each page and a web site where you can check your find and for "more alphabet fun."
Children's Literature - Jean Boreen
This book takes a unique look at the alphabet and the only way to explain it is with an example. "Alberto had an alligator, but he didn't have a bathing suit. Benoit had a bathing suit, but he didn't have a clarinet. And so on. The details in this book don't tend to easily go together, creating a tension that leads to a lot of humor. The illustrations, in primary colors with humorous details—a football player with egg yolk on his helmet, a goldfish hanging off a utility belt, clouds that look like birds—totally support the fun tone of the book. After Z, each character in the book realizes that if he or she gives his or her object to the person previously, all of them will be happy. I certainly wish this book had been around when my kids were younger, and I look forward to giving this book to parents of young children. What better recommendation can I give?
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-An entertaining alphabet book with a twist. Twenty-six children are ready to take part in an activity but cannot because each one is missing a crucial item. However, the youngster on the next page has it. For example, "Alberto had an alligator, but he didn't have a bathing suit. Beno"t had a bathing suit, but he didn't have a clarinet." Guess what Cara has. The humorous acrylic-and-collage pictures are bold, and the bright, crisp colors show up well against white backgrounds. Alberto's alligator wears swim goggles and jumps off a diving board, while the poor boy standing on the raft is dressed only in a barrel. The capital form of the letter is featured in the upper left corner; there is also another letter hidden somewhere on the page, which makes this title a seek-and-find as well as a concept book. The ending unites the children and the item they each need plus a bonus: friends. For another alphabet book in which children are connected through the letters, see Anita Lobel's Alison's Zinnia (HarperCollins, 1990). A fun way to learn the alphabet.-Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Canadian Book Review Annual
"This creative collaboration is highly recommended."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551438610
Publisher:
Orca Book Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
970,283
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Alberto had an alligator, but he didn't have a bathing suit.

Meet the Author

A graduate of the illustration program at Sheridan College in Ontario, Graham Ross began his freelance illustration and graphic design career in Ottawa. A career that has spawned illustrations for such publishers as Orca Book Publishers, Scholastic Canada, and Meadowside Books of the United Kingdom, as well as numerous Canadian government agencies and private design firms. He lives in Merrickville, Ontario with a circus star family: his juggling wife, a helldriver daughter, a canine cannonball, and a fire breathing cat. For more information, visit www.kidwithacrayon.com.

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Alphabetter 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Twenty-six boys and girls, from Alberto to Zara, have a problem. They each have something someone else wants, and they each need something they don't have. That darn alphabet just isn't cooperating!

Dinah has a doggy bone, but what she really needs is an egg. Louise has a letter, but she really wants a marshmallow. And poor Vladimir has a vase, but he really, really needs a water ski!

Each of them can get what they want, but only if they cooperate and switch the alphabet around! The answer to all of their problems is on the last page, if only they know how to get to the solution.

This is a fun book, and has the added bonus of containing a hidden letter on each page. And believe me, some of these letters are REALLY well hidden! Kids and parents will have to work together--like the children in the story--to find all the hidden letters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Twenty-six boys and girls, from Alberto to Zara, have a problem. They each have something someone else wants, and they each need something they don't have. That darn alphabet just isn't cooperating! Dinah has a doggy bone, but what she really needs is an egg. Louise has a letter, but she really wants a marshmallow. And poor Vladimir has a vase, but he really, really needs a water ski! Each of them can get what they want, but only if they cooperate and switch the alphabet around! The answer to all of their problems is on the last page, if only they know how to get to the solution. This is a fun book, and has the added bonus of containing a hidden letter on each page. And believe me, some of these letters are REALLY well hidden! Kids and parents will have to work together--like the children in the story--to find all the hidden letters. **Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka 'The Genius'