Alternative Approaches to Human Blood Resources in Clinical Practice: Proceedings of the Twenty-Second International Symposium on Blood Transfusion, Groningen 1997, organized by the Red Cross Blood Bank Noord Nederland / Edition 1

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Overview

Currently blood is a volatile issue. The safety of blood and the quantification of transfusion risks have been dominant themes that have stimulated the development of alternative approaches in this rapidly developing area. In clinical medicine conventional blood and its components are used in supportive therapies dependent on the choice of apparent uncritical trigger factors. A compounding factor is depth of prospective clinical trials for evidence. Such trials in critical care areas would be of enormous value, not only in recording adverse effects and under-transfusion, but also indicating the value of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness in transfusion practice. Alternative approaches include the use of cytokines, growth factors, humanised monoclonal antibodies, recombinant plasma factors, and buffy coat derived natural human interferons. These are being increasingly implemented in the clinic. Solutions for oxygen transport are being developed and fibrinogen coated microcapsules are being investigated for thrombocytopenia. In surgical patients, various crystalloid and colloid combinations are explored as volume replacements. To avoid allogeneic transfusions, beneficial blood saving methods include various strategies, such as autologous deposits, normovolemic haemodilution and various agents including aprotinin, tranecamic acid, desmopressin and erythropoietin, but their use in hospital shows considerable variations. That umbilical cord blood could be a significant source of allogeneic stem cells in related and unrelated transplantation is illustrated by the increasing number of cord blood banks in Europe and elsewhere. Future blood resources are likely to face several challenges: immediate challenges relate to increased regulatory and political oversights; intermediate solutions would offer some improvements in public health and alleviate public fear but probably not address the economic challenges thrust upon the medical care system.
As we approach the year 2000, the major concerns about transfusion medicine remain its logistics, safety and effectiveness. This theme is presented in the proceedings of the 22nd International Symposium on Blood Transfusion, developed in 21 up-to-date topics, collected and discussed in four sections.
This book will be of timely value to students, professionals and all others interested or involved in the field of transfusion medicine, whether clinical or related.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Demetra D. Callas, PhD (Loyola University Medical Center)
Description: This is compilation of the proceedings of the 22nd International Symposium on Blood Transfusion. The speakers at this meeting contributed articles based on their presentations to compile this volume.
Purpose: The purpose of the meeting was to address approaches to human blood resources in clinical practice. This is a timely topic as it is becoming increasingly more difficult to persuade the public to donate blood, so resources are limited and these should be used as efficiently as possible in light of expected increases in demand. Additionally, alternate blood sources should be continuously explored. In the course of this meeting these topics and current trends were extensively discussed.
Audience: The target audience is residents, practitioners, and professionals in the fields of transfusion medicine and blood banking. The speakers/contributors hold prominent positions in the field and their backgrounds are varied (academic hospitals, research organizations, and the private sector), providing a more comprehensive impression of current trends in the field.
Features: The volume covers four areas regarding human blood resources: optimization of supportive hemotherapy in the clinical setting; chemical and biological alternatives to human blood; alternative approaches in the clinical practice; and balancing risks, costs, and benefits. This is an encompassing volume that records current trends and thoughts in all aspects of this science. The fourth section is very interesting and informative. It is clear that more and larger studies are needed. The discussion section following the last article gives interesting insights and personal views that would probably have not been voiced in a more formal medium.
Assessment: This compilation will be of value to those who were unable to attend the meeting. It is an efficient means of bringing professionals in the field up to speed with the newest developments. This collection of each speaker's article and contribution is essential to transfusion medicine professionals, especially in view of the contributors' expertise and the varied backgrounds from which they come.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Demetra D. Callas, PhD(Loyola University Medical Center)
Description: This is compilation of the proceedings of the 22nd International Symposium on Blood Transfusion. The speakers at this meeting contributed articles based on their presentations to compile this volume.
Purpose: The purpose of the meeting was to address approaches to human blood resources in clinical practice. This is a timely topic as it is becoming increasingly more difficult to persuade the public to donate blood, so resources are limited and these should be used as efficiently as possible in light of expected increases in demand. Additionally, alternate blood sources should be continuously explored. In the course of this meeting these topics and current trends were extensively discussed.
Audience: The target audience is residents, practitioners, and professionals in the fields of transfusion medicine and blood banking. The speakers/contributors hold prominent positions in the field and their backgrounds are varied (academic hospitals, research organizations, and the private sector), providing a more comprehensive impression of current trends in the field.
Features: The volume covers four areas regarding human blood resources: optimization of supportive hemotherapy in the clinical setting; chemical and biological alternatives to human blood; alternative approaches in the clinical practice; and balancing risks, costs, and benefits. This is an encompassing volume that records current trends and thoughts in all aspects of this science. The fourth section is very interesting and informative. It is clear that more and larger studies are needed. The discussion section following the last article gives interesting insights and personal views that would probably have not been voiced in a more formal medium.
Assessment: This compilation will be of value to those who were unable to attend the meeting. It is an efficient means of bringing professionals in the field up to speed with the newest developments. This collection of each speaker's article and contribution is essential to transfusion medicine professionals, especially in view of the contributors' expertise and the varied backgrounds from which they come.
Demetra D. Callas
This is compilation of the proceedings of the 22nd International Symposium on Blood Transfusion. The speakers at this meeting contributed articles based on their presentations to compile this volume. The purpose of the meeting was to address approaches to human blood resources in clinical practice. This is a timely topic as it is becoming increasingly more difficult to persuade the public to donate blood, so resources are limited and these should be used as efficiently as possible in light of expected increases in demand. Additionally, alternate blood sources should be continuously explored. In the course of this meeting these topics and current trends were extensively discussed. The target audience is residents, practitioners, and professionals in the fields of transfusion medicine and blood banking. The speakers/contributors hold prominent positions in the field and their backgrounds are varied (academic hospitals, research organizations, and the private sector), providing a more comprehensive impression of current trends in the field. The volume covers four areas regarding human blood resources: optimization of supportive hemotherapy in the clinical setting; chemical and biological alternatives to human blood; alternative approaches in the clinical practice; and balancing risks, costs, and benefits. This is an encompassing volume that records current trends and thoughts in all aspects of this science. The fourth section is very interesting and informative. It is clear that more and larger studies are needed. The discussion section following the last article gives interesting insights and personal views that would probably have not been voiced in a more formal medium. Thiscompilation will be of value to those who were unable to attend the meeting. It is an efficient means of bringing professionals in the field up to speed with the newest developments. This collection of each speaker's article and contribution is essential to transfusion medicine professionals, especially in view of the contributors' expertise and the varied backgrounds from which they come.
Booknews
What will be the state of affairs of the blood supply and blood transfusion at the millennium in terms of safety, logistics, and effectiveness? Remarkably, the proceedings of the 1997 conference organized by the Red Cross Blood Bank, Noord, the Netherlands, are devoted to the sanguine topic of seeking alternatives to blood transfusion, the bread and butter so to speak of these experts. Two dozen presentations are organized around the themes of: how to optimize supportive hematology in the clinical setting; chemical and biological alternatives; alternative approaches in clinical practice; and the balance of risks, benefits, and costs. The concluding paper addresses the future of human blood resources. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Foreword. I. The Clinical Setting: How to Optimise Supportive Haemotherapy. II. Chemical and Biological Alternatives. III. Alternative Approaches in Clinical Practice. IV. The Balance of Risks, Benefits and Costs. Discussion. Index.

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