Always, Rachel: The Letters of Rachel Carson and Dorothy Freeman, 1952-1964 - The Story of a Remarkable Friendship

Always, Rachel: The Letters of Rachel Carson and Dorothy Freeman, 1952-1964 - The Story of a Remarkable Friendship

by Rachel Carson, Dorothy Freeman, Martha E. Freeman
     
 

Rachel Carson's landmark book Silent Spring set the modern environmental movement in motion.This very special collection of letters from Rachel Carson to her Maine summer neighbor Dorothy Freeman offers an intimate, spellbinding look at Carson's private life and thoughts.

An intimate collection of letters from the woman who sparked the modern environmental… See more details below

Overview

Rachel Carson's landmark book Silent Spring set the modern environmental movement in motion.This very special collection of letters from Rachel Carson to her Maine summer neighbor Dorothy Freeman offers an intimate, spellbinding look at Carson's private life and thoughts.

An intimate collection of letters from the woman who sparked the modern environmental movement.

"What is revealed in this selection of letters is the extraordinary, private person of Carson and her relationship with Freeman, the nature-loving, homebody friend of her later years. . . . It is not often that a collection of letters reveals character, emotional depth, personality, indeed intellect and talent, as well as a full biography might; these letters do all that."
-Doris Grumbach, The New York Times Book Review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Rachel Carson (1907-1964), author of The Silent Spring, has been celebrated as the pioneer of the modern environmental movement. Although she wrote no autobiography, she did leave letters, and those she exchanged-sometimes daily-with Dorothy Freeman, some 750 of which are collected here, are perhaps more satisfying than an account of her own life. In 1953, Carson became Freeman's summer neighbor on Southport Island, Me. The two discovered a shared love for the natural world-their descriptions of the arrival of spring or the song of a hermit thrush are lyrical-but their friendship quickly blossomed, as each realized she had found in the other a kindred spirit. To read this collection is like eavesdropping on an extended conversation that mixes the mundane events of the two women's family lives with details of Carson's research and writing and, later, her breast cancer. Readers will inevitably wonder about the nature of the women's relationship; editor Martha Freeman, Dorothy's granddaughter, believes that the correspondents' initial caution regarding the frankly romantic tone of their letters led them to destroy some. Whether the relationship was sexual, theirs was a deeply loving friendship, and reading their letters leaves a sense of wonder that they felt so free to give themselves this gift. ``Never forget, dear one, how deeply I have loved you all these years,'' Carson wrote less than a year before her death. And if, as Carson believed, ``immortality through memory is real,'' few who read these letters will forget these remarkable women and their even more remarkable bond. Photos. 25,000 first printing. (Mar.)
Library Journal
In 1952, after publishing The Sea Around Us, Carson struck up a unique friendship with Freeman that was to sustain both women until Carson's death in 1964. Although both were prolific letter writers, Carson's letters predominate here. Many of Freeman's letters and a fair number of Carson's may have been deliberately destroyed by mutual consent. Evidently, the two women were uneasy about their content being misinterpreted. The letters display an unusual intensity of feeling, which could easily lead outsiders to an assumption of a homosexual relationship were it not also clear that Freeman's husband and son and Carson's family particpated in and supported this friendship. Editor Martha Freeman, Dorothy's granddaughter, provides valuable footnotes explaining references to people and events in the letters unfamiliar to readers. These notes are set in the outside page margins, alongside the related text of the letters, a feature readers will find enormously helpful. This correspondence provides insight into the creative process and a look into the daily lives of two intelligent, perceptive women whose family responsibilities were, at times, almost crushing. Carson's crowning achievement, Silent Spring, seems all the more significant for having been accomplished while she was struggling with the side effects of cancer treatment. An important book for academic libraries and those public libraries where readers interested in ecology continue to appreciate the beauty and power of Carson's books.-Laurie Tynan, Montgomery-Norristown P.L., Pa.
Booknews
The first writing by Carson printed since Silent Spring in 1962 (the book credited with sparking the ecology movement in America), this collection is the only significant autobiographical writing presently available on Carson. The previously unpublished letters between Carson and her most intimate friend (whose daughter co-compiled this collection) document the two women's remarkable friendship, begun on the shores of Southport Island, Maine in 1952, as well as Carson's grace, strength, and the little-known personal burdens she faced. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Doris Grunbech
It is not often that a collection of letters reveal character, emotional depth, personality, and deep intellect and talent, as well as the full biography might; these letters do all that.
New York Times Book Review
H Patricia Hynes
Perhaps the finest element of these letters is the presence and proof of a great love and a passionate friendship whose power inspired a lyricism equal to the literary beauty of [Carson's] nature writing.
Boston Globe
Anita S. Manning
Open the window into Carson's character, her work as a scientist…the illness that ended her life and her loving friendship with another woman.
USA Today

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807070116
Publisher:
Beacon
Publication date:
05/01/1996
Pages:
608
Product dimensions:
6.29(w) x 9.24(h) x 1.43(d)

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