Always the Fat Kid: The Truth About the Enduring Effects of Childhood Obesity [NOOK Book]

Overview


Childhood obesity in the United States has tripled in a generation. But while debates continue over the content of school lunches and the dangers of fast food, we are just beginning to recognize the full extent of the long-term physical, psychological, and social problems that overweight children will endure throughout their lives. Most dramatically, children today have a shorter life expectancy than their parents, something never before seen in the course of human history. They will face more chronic ...

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Always the Fat Kid: The Truth About the Enduring Effects of Childhood Obesity

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Overview


Childhood obesity in the United States has tripled in a generation. But while debates continue over the content of school lunches and the dangers of fast food, we are just beginning to recognize the full extent of the long-term physical, psychological, and social problems that overweight children will endure throughout their lives. Most dramatically, children today have a shorter life expectancy than their parents, something never before seen in the course of human history. They will face more chronic illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes that will further burden our healthcare system. Here, authors Jacob Warren and K. Bryant Smalley examine the full effects of childhood obesity and offer the provocative message that being overweight in youth is not a disease but the result of poor lifestyle choices. Theirs is a clarion call for parents to have "the talk" with their kids, which medical professionals say is a harder topic to address than sex or drugs. Urgent, timely, and authoritative, Always the Fat Kid delivers a message our society can no longer ignore.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A chronicle of the painful, long-term effects of being a “fat kid.”… [And a] useful call to arms in the fight against childhood obesity.”—Kirkus

“Children are growing up in an environment that simultaneously glorifies super skinny bodies and eating unhealthy junk food, leading to many children’s unhealthy relationships with food and their bodies.  Parents need all the help they can get understanding the problem and what they can do to help their children resist or recover from these harmful forces.  A book for our times, Always the Fat Kid deals with the issues in a comprehensive and highly practical way.  It will help all parents do a better job promoting healthy food and eating habits with their kids for life.”—Diane E. Levin, Ph.D., professor of Early Childhood Education, Wheelock College and co-author of So Sexy So Soon    

“A page-turner. Always the Fat Kid is a must-read for parents or anyone who works with children.”— Kelly Dorfman, M.S., clinical nutritionist and author of the award winning What's Eating Your Child?

"This is a book we can all relate to, some painfully so. Issues of weight, body image, culture, and identity are critical for healthy development, a process often curtailed by the media. A  much needed book that helps us unpack the complexity of information in the culture about our bodies, ourselves, the complications it leds to in relationships. A must read for parents, clinicians, and anyone interested in the effects of childhood obesity."—Debra Merskin, professor, University of Oregon

"Always the Fat Kid comprehensively explores the underlying causes of childhood obesity and the impact this condition has on children, the adults they become and the social structure they exist within.  It is an excellent resource for parents, educators and all individuals concerned with understanding and ultimately halting this very personal and very public problem."—Rafael Cervantes, professor, St. Catherine University

Kirkus Reviews
A chronicle of the painful, long-term effects of being a "fat kid." With the rise of childhood obesity rates comes a new set of challenges for families and communities, write Warren and Smalley, co-directors of the Rural Health Research Institute at Georgia Southern University. Obese children face a combination of physical and psychological problems resulting in what the authors call "The Fat Kid Syndrome." Not only do these children often suffer from diabetes and high blood pressure, but they may also develop low self-esteem and compulsive behaviors. Further, they will likely experience depression and anxiety in greater numbers than their thinner peers--not to mention discrimination based on their appearance from colleagues, potential mates and even employers. The authors touch briefly on the causes of childhood obesity, including easy access to fast food, increased portion sizes and decreased emphasis on exercise. They also argue that parents are unwilling to speak honestly to their children about weight and that even doctors are instructed to avoid the topic out of fear of insulting or upsetting children. Warren and Smalley focus on raising awareness about the dangers of childhood obesity, and a short concluding chapter offers advice on how to help children and their families. They also include a helpful resource guide that includes nutrition, fitness and weight-control programs geared toward children. While childhood obesity is a trendy topic, even the authors acknowledge that there hasn't been enough time to research the long-term effects of the current epidemic. Therefore, much of what Smalley and Warren write about is speculation. They also come dangerously close to overgeneralizing the experience of obesity; certainly not all "fat kids" will suffer the extremes they describe. A flawed but useful call to arms in the fight against childhood obesity.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781137324191
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 3/26/2013
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


Jacob C. Warren, PhD and K. Bryant Smalley, PhD, PsyD are the co-executive directors of the Rural Health Research Institute at Georgia Southern University.  They have published numerous scientific articles on health behaviors, social influences on mental health, and the impact of obesity on children.

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