×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Am I Black Enough for You?: Jamaican Songs of Freedom
     

Am I Black Enough for You?: Jamaican Songs of Freedom

 
Black pride and cultural awareness were exploding across the globe in the '70s, from soul and funk rave-ups in the U.S. to Afrobeat and highlife workouts in Africa and finally to reggae meditations in Jamaica, ground zero for the Trojan collection Am I Black Enough for You? Jamaican Songs of Freedom 1970-1979. A slightly different stripped-down mix of See more details below

Overview

Black pride and cultural awareness were exploding across the globe in the '70s, from soul and funk rave-ups in the U.S. to Afrobeat and highlife workouts in Africa and finally to reggae meditations in Jamaica, ground zero for the Trojan collection Am I Black Enough for You? Jamaican Songs of Freedom 1970-1979. A slightly different stripped-down mix of Ken Boothe's classic (and hauntingly paranoid) reading of Syl Johnson's "Is It Because I'm Black" leads off the set. Covers of U.S. soul tunes have always been popular with Jamaican crowds and artists, yet the resonance between the two black communities is particularly high here, as Jamaica's independence in the early '60s coincided with the peak momentum of the civil rights movement in the U.S. The Chosen Few, from Jamaica but based for a brief time in Miami, deliver a delicious synth intro to their cover of Billy Paul's "Am I Black Enough for You," and Derrick Harriott glides effortlessly across Eddie Kendricks' classic falsetto in his version of the Temptations' "Message from a Blackman." With their own history of slavery and a deep history of identification with African roots, especially with regard to Rastafarianism, Jamaica's black pride wasn't a mirror of America's Afro-American zeitgeist. The best tracks on Am I Black Enough for You? are homegrown: the Heptones anthem "Black On Black (Be a Man)," "Black Man's World" by Alton Ellis, and Bob Andy's "Fire Burning" are just a few examples. A few choice rarities, including the little-heard "Black Oppressor" from Leo Simpson and "Don't Call Me Nigger" from the Soul Twins, round out this inspired set.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/07/2004
Label:
Sanctuary Records
UPC:
0060768050327
catalogNumber:
80503

Tracks

Album Credits

Technical Credits

Alton Ellis   Composer
Justin Hinds   Composer
Max Romeo   Composer
Joe Gibbs   Producer
Barrett Strong   Composer
Leroy Sibbles   Composer
Clancy Eccles   Composer,Producer
Linval Thompson   Composer,Producer
Duke Reid   Producer
Lloyd Charmers   Producer
Augustus "Gussie" Clarke   Producer
Clement "Coxsone" Dodd   Composer
Kenny Gamble   Composer
Winston "Niney" Holness   Producer
Leon Huff   Composer
Gregory Isaacs   Composer,Producer
Syl Johnson   Composer
Lee "Scratch" Perry   Composer,Producer
Rodguel "Blackbeard" Sinclair   Producer
Norman Whitfield   Composer
Tapper Zukie   Producer
Peter Weston   Producer
Laurence Cane-Honeysett   Creative Coordinator
Derrick Harriott   Producer
Harry Johnson   Producer
Llewellyn   Composer
Roy Reid   Composer
J. Jones   Composer
Macintosh people   Composer
Carlton Jackson   Composer
Stephen Nye   Liner Notes
Bob Andy   Composer
Glenn C. Watts   Composer
John Dawson Reed   Executive Producer
Leo Simpson   Composer,Producer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews