Am I Good Enough?: Preparing for Life's Final Exam [NOOK Book]

Overview

I Ask Myself Every Day...“Am I Good Enough?” Christians claim that Jesus is the only way to heaven. But how could a good God, who created the entire universe in all its diversity, be so limiting? Is Christianity unfair? Isn’t it more fitting to believe that good people from any religious or nonreligious background go to heaven, rather than people from one particular belief system? Maybe not, says Andy Stanley. In this updated edition of the bestselling book, teen readers will find out why Jesus taught that ...
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Am I Good Enough?: Preparing for Life's Final Exam

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Overview

I Ask Myself Every Day...“Am I Good Enough?” Christians claim that Jesus is the only way to heaven. But how could a good God, who created the entire universe in all its diversity, be so limiting? Is Christianity unfair? Isn’t it more fitting to believe that good people from any religious or nonreligious background go to heaven, rather than people from one particular belief system? Maybe not, says Andy Stanley. In this updated edition of the bestselling book, teen readers will find out why Jesus taught that goodness is not even a requirement to enter heaven—and why Christianity is beyond fair. Andy Stanley leads the next generation of young people to a grateful awareness of God’s enormous grace and mercy.

If only good people go to heaven,

would I make the cut?

If Christianity is true,

why is God so narrow-minded?

And why aren’t the answers obvious?!

They are. Find out why being “good enough” has nothing to do with heaven’s requirements, and why God is, in fact, not fair at all.

Story Behind the Book

Andy Stanley has a heart for families and a special place for today’s youth. Having served for many years as a youth and young adult pastor at a large church in Atlanta, his greatest goal was to lead a young person to Christ. With the success of his book How Good Is Good Enough and its acceptance as a widely used evangelistic tool, it was a natural step to refine this important question for the youth of today. Andy wanted to write a text that was aimed right at the heart of today’s young culture and put a cover on the book that would interest and attract them to it. Today’s youth are constantly looking for assurances in a crazy world. They get that assurance by learning that it is not how good you are, but that you are forgiven.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307563460
  • Publisher: The Doubleday Religious Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/19/2009
  • Series: LifeChange Books
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 751,957
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Andy Stanley is a graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary and the founding pastor of North Point Community Church in Alpharetta, Georgia, with a youthful congregation of more than 16,000 on three campuses. Andy is the author of the 1998 ForeWord Book of the Year finalist Visioneering , the bestsellers Like a Rock and The Next Generation Leader, and the recent How Good Is Good Enough? Andy and his wife, Sandra, have two sons and a daughter.


From the Hardcover edition.
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First Chapter

am I good enough?


By Andy Stanley

Multnomah Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2005 Andy Stanley
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1-59052-467-5


Chapter One

Everything's Fine

If you are like most people, you believe that everybody lives forever somewhere, that once you die your soul goes somewhere. Most Americans believe in heaven. A smaller percentage believe in hell. In other parts of the world, the prevailing belief is that the soul comes back around for another lap-we just start over as someone (or something) else.

In spite of all their differences and peculiarities, the religions of this world share one common denominator: How you live your life on this side of the grave determines what happens next. American thought has all the good people going to heaven. In some other parts of the world, the good people come back around as even better people, or at least with the opportunity to become a better person.

Think About It

Here's something to think about: If God appeared to you and asked, "Why should I let you into heaven?" how would you answer? If you're like most people, your answer might run something along these lines:

"I've always tried to ..."

"I never ..."

"I do my best ..."

Whether I am talking to Muslims, Hindus, Christians, or just the average guy on the street the majority of the answers I receive to that question go back to an individual's attempt to live a goodlife. Why? Because most people believe that good people go to heaven.

The moral? Behave yourself now and you don't really need to worry too much about what happens next. The end. Now let's get back to hanging out at the mall, going to class, watching The O.C.-you know, the important things in life.

Packed and Ready

But then every once in a while something happens that forces you to seriously consider the question of what's next-a family member dies, you almost hit that car in front of you while you're changing the radio station, or maybe you don't like yourself too much and wonder what it would be like if you just weren't around anymore. You don't like to think about it. You rarely ever talk about it. But it is always there. And the older you get, the more often you find yourself pushing it from your mind.

The fact is, the death rate for humans is 100 percent. That's right, there's no chance of escaping it. The odds are definitely against you, and that bothers you. In spite of the fact that you believe there is something better on the other side of life, you are not at peace. And for good reason.

You see, as good as you are-and you are pretty good-you aren't really sure if you have been good enough. You hope so. And you are certainly better than ... well ... than certain people you know.

But how good is good enough?

Where is the line? What, or who, can we compare ourselves to? Do we have enough time to tack on enough good deeds to make the cut?

And while we're asking questions, I'll go ahead and throw one in that perhaps you've wondered about but were afraid to ask: Just who is in charge of this operation? God? If so, he should have been a bit clearer about how this whole thing works. If our eternal residence hangs in the balance based on how we live this life, we could certainly do with some direction. A standard. A mile marker or two. Perhaps a midterm.

"But wait," you say, "isn't it the job of religion to answer those questions for me?" Sure. Most of the various world religions and their books do exist to answer those questions. Teachers, preachers, ulema, rabbis, priests, lamas-they are all in the business of getting us safely to the other side. Specifically, they are responsible for helping you and me understand how to live in such a way as to ensure a happy ending.

So why are you still unsure? Maybe you've been to church. Perhaps you went to a Vacation Bible School as a kid, or some guy from your school invited you to his youth group meeting. And yet, if you are like the majority of people I talk to, you still are not confident where you stand with God.

Many years ago, there was a great leader named Gandhi. He was a peaceful man who lived in India. I ran across a quote from him that speaks to the general feeling that most of us have when it comes to religious uncertainty. When asked why he spent a lot of his time teaching his followers about politics instead of religion, he said, "In the realm of the political and social and economic, we can be sufficiently certain to convert; but in the realm of religion there is not sufficient certainty to convert anybody, and, therefore, there can be no conversions in religions." Now that's helpful, isn't it? Even Gandhi didn't find certainty in religion.

To Grandmother's House We Go

Several years ago my wife, Sandra, walked into our kitchen, sat down on the bar stool, and announced that she wanted to make a special trip to her hometown for the purpose of talking to her aging grandmother, Helen, about eternity. I was surprised. Helen was almost ninety at the time. She grew up going to the local Methodist church. Until her health became an issue, she rarely missed a Sunday. She was way better than the average person. Certainly good by anybody's standard.

"What brought this on?" I asked.

"I'm not sure," Sandra said. "I just don't know how much longer she will be with us, and I've never talked to her about God or heaven or any of that." For most people who knew Helen, her ultimate destination would be the least of their concerns. If good people go to heaven, she was a shoo-in. Nevertheless, Sandra hopped in the car and drove two and a half hours to chat with her grandmother.

Helen knew she was coming. Sandra showed up under the guise of wanting to make cookies. But after about thirty minutes of chitchat, she popped the question. She said, "Grandmama, we've never talked about heaven before. Are you sure that when you die you will go to heaven?"

Helen got big tears in her eyes and responded the way the average good person responds to that question. She said, "I hope so, honey."

"I hope so"? Ninety years of good living, standing by her dying husband till the end, serving her community, loving her grandchildren, paying her taxes, driving the speed limit, and she hopes she's going to heaven? If Helen can't go to sleep at night with the peace of knowing that things between her and her creator are good, I'm not sure who can. If Helen ain't sure, can't nobody be sure.

So why is it that even the really good people at best "hope so"? I'll tell you why. Because nobody can tell you how good you have to be to go to heaven.

Nobody.

Don't believe me? Get out the phone book and start calling the religious leaders in your community. You will get an earful of information, but when the words finally quit flowing, you'll be back to "I hope so."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from am I good enough? by Andy Stanley Copyright © 2005 by Andy Stanley. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2005

    No to legalism

    I want to comment on the review above me. People can argue all they want about rules, but the truth is that no man comes to the father except through the Son (sraight out of Jesus mouth). He does want us to behave in certain ways, but if the requirements for salvation centered on our works (whether or not we are 'good'), then nobody would make it to heaven. This was the whole purpose Jesus was here for. Jesus did not come to preach condemnation. I just want everyone to know that it is alright to enjoy your life. God is not up there condemning us. He wants us to succeed, and the Bible tells us that! Please do not be turned off of reading this book due to the Spirit of legalism that has permeated the modern church. Jesus was a radical that came preaching redemption, and Andy Stanley is a great author who knows that! Check this book out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2005

    This book tells it like it is!

    In this book, Andy Stanley outlines the Biblical concept of being saved by faith not by works (e.g. It is not our good deeds that get us into heaven). Stanley's book helps the reader to understand what Jesus was saying when He said that no one comes to the Father except through the Son. This book doesn't stray from concepts in the Bible, it just makes them clear and easy to grasp. This book is a great read, and a refreshing break from the concept of legalism that seems to have invaded the church. Andy Stanley shows that the church (the body of Christ) is not centered on rules and rules alone in a book that is well written and fun to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2005

    ??

    I believe Paul in one of his letters eases up a bit on the rhetoric and acknowledges that a few people ( but not entire nations ) get saved because of their behavior in life ( yes people who never knew anything about religion or even God - ouch ). Of course the current brand of theology sweeping the US ignores that Jesus was quite the little stickler for good behavior - do unto others etc. If you are placing your hope on the new theology you might want to cover your rump by not being an sob to your neighbor, just in case Jesus counts behavior as belief, or at least closely related.

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