Amanda Bean's Amazing Dream: A Mathematical Story

( 4 )

Overview

Amanda Bean loves to count everything, from the books in the library to the popcorn in her bowl. If only she could count faster! Her teacher tries to persuade her of the virtues of multiplication, but Amanda remains unconvinced--until she has an amazing dream. Full color.

Amanda loves to count everything, but not until she has an amazing dream does she finally realize that being able to multiply will help her count things faster.

...
See more details below
Hardcover
$13.59
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (29) from $5.89   
  • New (16) from $10.20   
  • Used (13) from $5.89   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Amanda Bean loves to count everything, from the books in the library to the popcorn in her bowl. If only she could count faster! Her teacher tries to persuade her of the virtues of multiplication, but Amanda remains unconvinced--until she has an amazing dream. Full color.

Amanda loves to count everything, but not until she has an amazing dream does she finally realize that being able to multiply will help her count things faster.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Education World
Oklahoma City, OK
June 2000
Multiplication is a tough concept for many kids to grasp.Indeed, many kids learn times tables without fully nderstanding the simple concept that underlies them --that multiplication is an easier form of addition. Now, along comes Amanda Bean -- the poster child for multiplication misunderstanding!
Amanda loves to count. Her friends even call her "Bean Counter" because she sees everything as a counting challenge. Amanda loves to count so much that she can't seethe sense in learning to multiply -- in spite of the urgings of her parents and teachers, who try to explain how learning to multiply will make the counting process even easier!
However, as luck would have it, everything changes one night. Amanda is so focused on counting that even her dreams involve counting -- but this night she is so overwhehned by the counting challenges in her dream that multiplication finally makes sense to her. ("Y-a-a-h-h-h!" cheer the sheep in Amanda!s dream when she finally gets it!)
Amanda Bean's Amazing Dream (produced under the Marilyn Bums Brainy Day Book label by Scholastic Press) was written by Cindy Neuschwander, who also wrote Sir Cumference and the First Round Table. Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations by Liza Woodruff add real kid appeal -- not to mention countless opportunities to multiply! And Bums, a nationally known math educator, offers ideas for teaching the principle of multiplication and for extending the story and learning.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-The advantages of multiplication are introduced in a simple story about an African-American girl who loves to count things, both in and out of school, but is unsure how multiplication will speed up the process. After counting the tiles on the kitchen counter and the books on the library shelves, she falls asleep and begins to dream of a calm bike ride in the country. Then, eight sheep on bicycles come zooming by and stop at a barn to get five yarn balls apiece to give to seven grandmothers knitting sweaters. Amanda is overwhelmed by trying to tot up bicycle wheels, sheep legs, knitting needles, and sweater arms-until the sheep and the grandmothers begin shouting, "Multiply!" She awakes, convinced that she wants to learn how. Large, lively, ink-and-watercolor cartoons in cheerful colors are filled with objects to count, from lollipops to windowpanes. A comprehenive guide for adults on the usage of the principles and pictures in the book is included.-Patricia Pearl Dole, formerly at First Presbyterian School, Martinsville, VA
Kirkus Reviews
The protagonist in this story has a sort of low-grade obsessive/compulsive disorder: "I count anything and everything," chirps Amanda. The problem is that Amanda's class is moving on to multiplication and she just doesn't get it. So she keeps counting things one by one until a dream of too many sheep, too many knitting needles, and too many sweaters pushes her over the edge. Amanda's story is the forgettable vehicle for what is really at stake here: to disclose the mysteries of multiplication. While the illustrations make the concept graphically obvious, the text can be confusing: "I know about the multiplication sign, X. It means that things can come in groups, or rows, or columns," but "What I do not know are the multiplication facts." The term multiplication table is avoided, to no positive effect. At the end of the book, Marilyn Burns (The Greedy Triangle, 1995, etc.) does a credible, if prim, job of explaining the broad contexts of multiplication to adults working with children. (Picture book. 6-10)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780590300124
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 108,025
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD290L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.86 (w) x 10.72 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    Excellent

    I used this during a whole group reading with my group of 3rd graders and they loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)