Amanda's Story (Girls of Lighthouse Lane Series #4)

Amanda's Story (Girls of Lighthouse Lane Series #4)

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by Thomas Kinkade, Erika Tamar
     
 

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Katherine is the daughter of the lighthouse keeper. She dreams of becoming a painter. But in 1905, a girl can't grow up to be a famous artist -- can she?

Rose just moved to the town of Cape Light. She wants to fit in with her new friends, but Rose has a secret she can't share with anyone ...

Lizabeth is Kat's rich cousin who always gets what she wants.

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Overview

Katherine is the daughter of the lighthouse keeper. She dreams of becoming a painter. But in 1905, a girl can't grow up to be a famous artist -- can she?

Rose just moved to the town of Cape Light. She wants to fit in with her new friends, but Rose has a secret she can't share with anyone ...

Lizabeth is Kat's rich cousin who always gets what she wants. But Lizabeth soon finds out that money can't keep her from losing the most precious thing of all ...

Amanda's mother passed away, and now Amanda keeps house for her minister father. When she meets a very special young man, can she find the courage to be friends with him in spite of her father's disapproval?

The quiet New England town of Cape Light never seems to change. But starting in 1905, the lives of these four friends will be transformed in ways they never could have imagined ...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061958434
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/23/2009
Series:
Girls of Lighthouse Lane Series , #4
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
236,073
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Girls of Lighthouse Lane #4

Amanda's Story
By Thomas Kinkade

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2005 Thomas Kinkade
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060543523

Chapter One

Saturday night, October 21, 1905

Amanda Morgan paused on the path outside the Hallorans' barn. She smoothed the long skirt of her new burgundy wool dress from the Montgomery Ward catalog and wondered if the boy who stared at her in church would be at the barn dance tonight. No, he didn't even live in Cape Light .... But maybe.... No, of course not .... The thought of seeing him, maybe even talking to him, made Amanda jittery.

It would be better, and lots more relaxing, if he wasn't here. Anyway, her father didn't approve of courtship at her age. And more than anything, she wanted to be the perfect model of a minister's daughter and make him proud.

Amanda adjusted her heavy wool shawl so that the pretty crocheted edging at the neckline of her dress would show. She bit her lips and pinched her cheeks to give them color-tricks that her friend Lizabeth had taught her. But Amanda's cheeks were already flushed with excitement. Even from outside, Amanda could hear the toe-tapping music and the fiddler calling, "Swing in the center, then break that pair; lady goes on and gent stays there. . .

The last barn dance in Cape Light had been ages ago, after the barn raising for a just-married couple on William McKinley Road. Amanda had been only eleven then. The boys she knew from school had piled up at the refreshment table, competing to see who could eat the most. Not that she'd cared; it had been fun to skip around with her girlfriends and dance the Virginia reel with Father. But now she was thirteen and everything was different.

Amanda scanned the crowd as she entered. No, she didn't see him-and, in spite of herself, she felt a stab of disappointment.

He had started coming to Father's church a month ago and then he showed up every Sunday. He was startlingly handsome, with sun-streaked brown hair and the warmest dark eyes. He looked older-muscular and manly-at least sixteen! When their eyes first met, Amanda was surprised by the jolt of electricity. She blushed and quickly lowered her head in prayer. She would never boldly look at him, but Sunday after Sunday, she could feel him staring. It raised prickles along the back of her neck.

He always came alone. Someone said he was a deckhand at the Cape Light docks, but lived in the neighboring town of Cranberry. There was a fine house of worship in Cranberry, so why was he coming to her father's church?

"Amanda, over here!" her best friend Kat called. Kat's cousin Lizabeth stood next to her and waved. Amanda hung her shawl on a coat rack and headed toward her friends, past the long table groaning with potato salad, fried fish, fried chicken, cole slaw, baked beans, and a whole ham. The little kids were jostling each other to get to Mrs. White's famous lemon meringue pie.

"Allemande left and allemande right," the fiddler called. Amanda made her way around the lively dancers. There was Father swinging a thrilled, laughing Hannah off her feet. Amanda was happy to see Father giving his full attention to her six-year-old sister; Hannah needed it so much. At least tonight I don't have to take care of her, Amanda thought. I'm free as a bird! She immediately felt guilty. It's not as if I'm kept in a cage, she told herself ...

Continues...


Excerpted from The Girls of Lighthouse Lane #4 by Thomas Kinkade Copyright © 2005 by Thomas Kinkade. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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