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Ambrose Bierces Write It Right: The Celebrated Cynics Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers
     

Ambrose Bierces Write It Right: The Celebrated Cynics Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers

by Jan Freeman
 

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In 1893, Ambrose Bierce declared "I am for preserving the ancient, primitive distinction between right and wrong." In Write it Right, originally published in 1909, Bierce turned this considerable zeal on the English language. The result revealed that the satirical author of The Devils Dictionary had a keen ear for the vernacular--and that he hated it. This slim volume

Overview

In 1893, Ambrose Bierce declared "I am for preserving the ancient, primitive distinction between right and wrong." In Write it Right, originally published in 1909, Bierce turned this considerable zeal on the English language. The result revealed that the satirical author of The Devils Dictionary had a keen ear for the vernacular--and that he hated it. This slim volume of his 300 or so reviled words and expressions contains many we use today with no hesitation at all. (Of "electrocution" he says, "To one having even an elementary knowledge of Latin grammar this word is no less than disgusting, and the thing meant by it is felt to be altogether too good for the words inventor.") Jan Freeman, author of the weekly column "The Word" for the Boston Globe, annotates Bierces rulings with style, humor, and in-depth research, revealing what Bierce got right--and what he didnt--and giving insight into how the language has changed over the past century. Write it Right, with its incisive wit and insight into the history of American English, is the perfect gift for word curmudgeons everywhere.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802719706
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
11/19/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
File size:
782 KB

Meet the Author

Celebrated cynic Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) defined himself as "a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be." A friend and rival of Mark Twain, Bierce was one of nineteenth-century Americas most renowned satirists. A Union veteran of the Civil War, he became one of the best-known writers and journalists in the country. In 1913 he set off for Mexico, then in the throes of revolution, and was never seen again. Since moving to Boston in the 1970s, Jan Freeman has worked as an editor at The Real Paper, an alternative weekly; at Boston and Inc. magazines; and at the Boston Globe, where she was a science news editor when she launched "The Word," her weekly column on English usage, in 1997. She lives in Auburndale, Massachusetts.
Jan Freeman has worked as an editor at The Real Paper, an alternative weekly; at Boston and Inc. magazines; and at the Boston Globe, where she was a science news editor when she launched "The Word," her weekly column on English usage, in 1997. She lives in Auburndale, Massachusetts.

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