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Amelia Earhart: The Turbulent Life of an American Icon [NOOK Book]

Overview


When Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific in 1937, she was at the height of her fame. Fascination with Earhart remains just as strong today, as her mysterious disappearance continues to inspire speculation. In this nuanced and often surprising biography, acclaimed aviation historian Kathleen C. Winters moves beyond the caricature of the spunky, precocious pilot to offer a more complex portrait. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary accounts, airline records, and other original research, this book reveals a ...
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Amelia Earhart: The Turbulent Life of an American Icon

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Overview


When Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific in 1937, she was at the height of her fame. Fascination with Earhart remains just as strong today, as her mysterious disappearance continues to inspire speculation. In this nuanced and often surprising biography, acclaimed aviation historian Kathleen C. Winters moves beyond the caricature of the spunky, precocious pilot to offer a more complex portrait. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary accounts, airline records, and other original research, this book reveals a flawed heroine who was frequently reckless and lacked basic navigation skills, but who was also a canny manipulator of mass media. Winters details how Earhart and her husband, publisher George Putnam, worked to establish her as an international icon, even as other spectacular pilots went unnoticed. Sympathetic yet unsentimental, this biography helps us to see Amelia Earhart with fresh eyes.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Amelia Earhart was not the best female pilot of her time, claims Winters: "She was not a 'natural stick,' in pilots' parlance, and struggled during her flight training." But she was, of course, the most widely known. In this insightful biography, Winters (Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air) looks at Earhart's achievements and, perhaps more significantly, the influence of her husband, George Palmer Putnam, who promoted her tirelessly and "catapulted her to fame" by helping with fundraising and setting up book deals and speaking engagements. The couple would eventually rub elbows with "celebrities, artists, adventurers, and socialites," like Franklin Delano and Eleanor Roosevelt. The author traces Earhart's interest in aviation to "the many railroad trips she took with her father, and a tendency to experiment with all types of sports and games." Winters describes her gradual "transformation from genteel woman to airfield hanger-on, cropping her long hair and wearing breeches, boots, and an oil-stained leather jacket." She avoids romanticizing Earhart and points out her personal short-comings, such as an occasional reluctance to prepare properly for excursions. But Winters still believes equipment failure was just as responsible for Earhart's ill-fated final flight in 1937 as the pilot's insufficiencies. In so doing, she paints a fair picture of the famous woman aviator that so successfully captured the American imagination. Photos.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
From the Publisher
“In this insightful biography, Winters looks at Earhart’s achievements and, perhaps more significantly, the influence of her husband, George Palmer Putnam, who promoted her tirelessly and ‘catapulted her to fame’ by helping with fundraising and setting up book deals and speaking engagements. She avoids romanticizing Earhart and points out her personal short-comings, such as an occasional reluctance to prepare properly for excursions. But Winters still believes equipment failure was just as responsible for Earhart’s ill-fated final flight in 1937 as the pilot’s insufficiencies. In so doing, she paints a fair picture of the famous woman aviator that so successfully captured the American imagination.”—Publishers Weekly

 

“In this biography…Kathleen C. Winters chooses to disregard the afterlife.  She focuses on Earhart’s surprising lack of technical skill and flight experience, drawing on her own experience as a pilot, and on contemporary opinion. Fascinating reading.”—The Times Literary Supplement

 

"Succinctly lays out the facts of Amelia Earhart's remarkable story from 'a pilot's perspective' . . . The author's knowledge of aviation history renders this a proficient chronicle of women in flight."—Kirkus Reviews

“Winters follows her biography Anne Morrow Lindbergh (2006) with a refreshing look at Earhart. Resisting tabloid tales, Winters focuses on responsible accounts and Earhart’s own writings to show how public demands and family pressures induced the aviatrix to fly beyond her capabilities. With erudite analysis of everything from Earhart’s flying to her marriage and longtime financial support of her parents and sister, Winters proves there is still much to learn about this American icon.”—Booklist

“In this latest installment of Earhart historiography, Winters (Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air) explores her subject’s skills as an aviator and questions her character, thus providing another corrective to earlier Earhart hagiographies and popular perceptions. Earhart’s accomplishments have been scrutinized for some time, and Winters’s well-written and thoroughly researched study should serve as a final corrective. Recommended both as a character study and a technical study to general readers and specialists.”—Library Journal

“The late aviation historian Winters draws on a variety of new sources, including Earhart’s own writings, to tell with an absorbing style the amazing story of a flawed American heroine. Winters’s ‘back story’ of her subject’s growth and achievements, problems, and ultimate failure focuses on the human development of an international celebrity who chose to fly beyond her capabilities, rather than conjecturing on Earhart’s fate after the crash. Highly recommended.”—CHOICE

“Winters vividly captures what life was like for Earhart and her fellow women pilots in the 1920s and early ’30s, when technology was developing and flying was dangerous.”— St. Paul Pioneer-Press

“Informative and insightful.”—Asbury Park Press

“Unsparing as Winters is with her subject’s many shortcomings, her admiration for her intrepid spirit comes shining through.”—Living Scotsman

 

“Kathleen Winters's book is full of details I had never known about Amelia Earhart, which put her achievements and ultimate tragedy in a surprising new perspective. The author's experience as a pilot herself comes through in every part of the book. Anyone interested in flying or women who defy stereotypes will enjoy this book; but it also is a study in the timeless American traditions of marketing and PR.”—James Fallows, Atlantic Monthly, author of Free Flight

 

“Kathleen C. Winters promises to dig through the myths and heroic dross to look at Amelia Earhart from ‘a pilot’s perspective.’  This she does with masterly story-telling precision, revealing the sad truth that the famous aviatrix was all too often (usually owing to conflicting demands) ill-prepared to undertake her many attempted record flights.  The result is a sober and absorbing account of the world’s most iconic, yet tragic female pilot.”—Larry E. Tise, author of Conquering the Sky and the Wilbur and Orville Wright Distinguished Professor of History, East Carolina University     

“In Amelia Earhart: The Turbulent Life of an American Icon, pilot and biographer Kathleen C. Winters draws upon new sources to give us a welcome and long overdue account of Earhart’s tumultuous career, as well as the careful fashioning of her public image.  A book with no small share of surprises, and an important contribution to the history of women and aviation.”—David Toomey, author of Stormchasers and co-author of Amelia Earhart's Daughters

“If you’re only going to read one Amelia biography, make it this one. It’s fast moving, puts all the facts in the context of the times and doesn’t try to prove a point. It’s hard to put down.”—Budd Davisson, Editor-in-Chief, Flight Journal magazine

 

Praise for Anne Morrow Lindergh:

 

"A perfectly calibrated tribute to an early heroine of the air."—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

 

"Both pointed and modest."—The New York Times Book Review

 

"Beautifully written."—Booklist

Library Journal
In this latest installment of Earhart historiography, Winters (Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air) explores her subject's skills as an aviator and questions her character, thus providing another corrective to earlier Earhart hagiographies and popular perceptions. Winters gives us a complex woman who pursued a frenetic career; endured and supported a dependent mother and sister; accomplished transcontinental, transatlantic and Pacific flights although lacking extensive aeronautical savvy; managed to alienate some fellow women pilots by taking credit for their work in establishing separate records for aviatrixes; and padded the record of her time in the air to enhance an already overblown reputation. Winters points out that Earhart agreed to her marriage to George Putnam in the interest of fame and profit, participated in lucrative stump speeches that were passionate exhortations for commercial aviation, and traded on her friendship with President Roosevelt to facilitate her ill-fated around-the-world flight that ended in a massive sea rescue operation costing $4 million in 1937. VERDICT Earhart's accomplishments have been scrutinized for some time, and Winters's well-written and thoroughly researched study should serve as a final corrective. Recommended both as a character study and a technical study to general readers and specialists.—John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Cleveland
Kirkus Reviews

Brisk life of the famed aviator who is more often taken to task for her sloppy technique than lauded for her bravery.

Pilot and aviation historian Winters (Anne Morrow Lindbergh, 2006, etc.) succinctly lays out the facts of Amelia Earhart's remarkable story from "a pilot's perspective," underscoring how Earhart tended to skimp on the details of preparation for her difficult flights—e.g., on her last fatal flight around the world, she had not mastered the radio technology and resisted learning Morse code, which would have allowed the ship circling Howland Island in the Pacific to find her. Moreover, her handler turned husband George P. Putnam fashioned publicity events that forced her to adhere to unsound deadlines. Clues to Earhart's personality emerge from her peripatetic upbringing, especially in terms of her disintegrating family due to her father's drinking and loss of employment as a railroad lawyer. Her father's devil-may-care attitude and her mother's free spending fueled Earhart's delight in adventure and risk-taking. She was a tomboy, athlete and feminist, her Midwestern edges polished at a Philadelphia finishing school and later at Columbia University, but she restlessly worked many jobs to pay for her initial flying lessons. Her life-changing opportunity came with a call from former Army Air Corps pilot Hilton H. Railey in April 1928; he and promoter Putnam were seeking a replacement pilot for a transatlantic flight (with a male flight crew) and were impressed by Earhart's Lindy-like looks and poise. Criticism that she flew on the Friendshipmerely as "sheep in the cabin" prodded her to plan her own stunts, and by May 1931 she had made the solo transatlantic flight that established her reputation. In addition to examining Earhart, Winters includes the achievements of lesser-known women pilots such as Ruth Nichols.

The author's knowledge of aviation history renders this a proficient chronicle of women in flight.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230112292
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 11/23/2010
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 712,366
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author


Kathleen C. Winters was an aviation historian, licensed pilot, and author of the critically acclaimed Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air. A resident of St. Paul, Minnesota, she passed away in August of 2010.

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Table of Contents


March 27, 1937 * Heritage * Childhood, 1900-1913 * On the Move, 1913-1920 * Flying Lessons, 1920-1924 * Boston, 1924-1928 * The Invitation * To Trepassey * Across the Atlantic * The Heroine * The Vagabond * Off and Running, 1928-1929 * The Derby * Breaking Records, 1929-1930 * Marriage, 1930-1931 * The Fun of It, 1931-1932 * Celebrity, 1932-1935 * Over the Pacific * Detours, 1935-1937 * The Idea * Preparations * The Final Flight


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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    I am a sophomore high school student that had to read this book

    I am a sophomore high school student that had to read this book for a research project. I found this book to be
    interesting and I very much enjoyed reading it. It talks about how Amelia came to love aviation, even though
    she never expected it to become so significant in her life. It demonstrated how Amelia was a strong symbol for
     women, as many women at the time did not even own a plane. Reading how kind Amelia was in giving back to
     her family, by giving her mother money, and her fellow aviators by donating items whoever won a race. It talks
    about her rise to fame even though some of her flying attempts had failed. This book does not give excess
    information on things that aren't important. It discusses you of people and events throughout Amelia's life that 
    were influential in her personal as well as in her career as an aviator. This book gives brief information on how a
    certain person, event, or plane is connected to Amelia and her life. It talks about Amelia's various friends, both
    aviators and non aviators and their opinions about Amelia and her flying career. What I really enjoyed most
    about this book was seeing how once Amelia became interested in aviation, she never wanted to stop flying
    and didn't care that it was dangerous .  

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 16, 2011

    bw

    love it

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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