America: A 200-Year Salute in Story and Song

America: A 200-Year Salute in Story and Song

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by Johnny Cash
     
 

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An ambitious reissue campaign in honor of Johnny Cash's 70th birthday (February 26, 2001, if you want to send a much-deserved card) kicks off with 1972's concept album, America, subtitled "A 200-Year Salute in Story and Song." In dialogue filling in the historical gaps between songs, Cash does an impressive job of condensing 200-plus years history into an

Overview

An ambitious reissue campaign in honor of Johnny Cash's 70th birthday (February 26, 2001, if you want to send a much-deserved card) kicks off with 1972's concept album, America, subtitled "A 200-Year Salute in Story and Song." In dialogue filling in the historical gaps between songs, Cash does an impressive job of condensing 200-plus years history into an engaging anecdotal account of progress and perseverance, tragedy and triumph, vision and daring that is the experiment in democracy called America. While the tone is upbeat, Cash doesn't let anyone off lightly when it comes to the treatment of Native Americans, either in his dialogue or in his song about the Battle of the Little Bighorn and the massacre at Wounded Knee, "Big Foot." Elsewhere, June Carter's "The Road to Kaintuck" is an evocative take on the dangers facing the pioneers as they moved westward; an acoustic version of Jimmy Driftwood's "The Battle of New Orleans" offers history in colorful, condensed form, with Cash adding his own taunting flourishes when describing the oncoming Redcoats; Ramblin' Jack Elliott's "Mister Garfield" recounts the story behind the assassination of the 20th president; Jane Bowers's "Remember the Alamo" (which first appeared on Cash's 1964 Ring of Fire album) is a classic story-song about the gallantry of Col. William B. Travis and his recruits -- David Crockett and Jim Bowie among them -- in their ill-fated defense of the Spanish mission, a defeat that came to symbolize Americans' willingness to make the ultimate sacrifice in defense of freedom. Cash sums up everything in grand fashion with his own album-closing tribute, "These Are My People," a salute to ordinary men and women, bound by blood and land, whose courage built a nation and whose descendants, "heirs of a creed to live by," ensure its survival. Some smart teacher is going to use this album to help illustrate a course in American history. It doesn't hurt the rest of us to remember, either.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972443928
catalogNumber:
724439
Rank:
66242

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Johnny Cash   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Norman Blake   Banjo,Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Gut String Guitar
Carl Perkins   Electric Guitar
Mark Morris   Percussion
Chuck Cochran   Piano
Ray Edenton   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Marshall Grant   Bass,Bass Guitar
Red Lane   Rhythm Guitar,Gut String Guitar
Bob Wootton   Electric Guitar,Gut String Guitar
W.S. Holland   Drums
Charlie McCoy   Bass,Harmonica
Casey   Guitar

Technical Credits

Johnny Cash   Arranger,Composer
Charlie Bragg   Engineer
Larry Butler   Producer,Audio Production
Quaglieri   Producer
Glenn Tubb   Composer
Abraham Lincoln   Composer
Freeman Ramsey   Engineer
Charlie Williams   Composer

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America: A 200-Year Salute in Story and Song 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Has mostly little known, but great songs. One outstanding song is "Lorena". As usual Johnny's voice adds a lot.