America Against The World
  • America Against The World
  • America Against The World

America Against The World

4.0 1
by Andrew Kohut, Bruce Stokes
     
 

ISBN-10: 0805083057

ISBN-13: 9780805083057

Pub. Date: 05/01/2007

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

"Once you see the deep and diffuse roots of current anti-Americanism, you realize there won't be an easy fix."—The New York Times Book Review

The rise of anti-Americanism is the most pressing challenge facing us. In America Against the World, Pew Research Center president Andrew Kohut and Bruce Stokes consider the surprising findings of

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Overview

"Once you see the deep and diffuse roots of current anti-Americanism, you realize there won't be an easy fix."—The New York Times Book Review

The rise of anti-Americanism is the most pressing challenge facing us. In America Against the World, Pew Research Center president Andrew Kohut and Bruce Stokes consider the surprising findings of Pew's unprecedented survey of world opinion to understand why the world has turned against America: where once we were considered the champion of democracy, we are now seen as a militant hyperpower.

The answer: Americans' go-it-alone attitudes have pushed the world away. From our business endeavors abroad to the Bush administration's preemptive war policy, exceptional individualism—in particular, our belief in personal responsibility and our unclouded optimism—have encouraged the world to view the United States as a bully and a threat. Former secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright argues in her foreword that we cannot stop the spread of anti-Americanism without truly understanding who we are. America Against the World provides the insights to take that step.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805083057
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
05/01/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
681,458
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.64(d)

Table of Contents


Foreword   Madeleine K. Albright     ix
Introduction: America's Image     xiii
America Under the Microscope     1
The Rise of Anti-Americanism     22
The American Way     41
The Problem of American Exceptionalism     68
A Blessed People     91
Doing Business, Practicing Democracy     120
Globalization and Americanization     138
Acting Together-Or Alone     162
Use of Force     193
Two Americas, One American     206
Conclusion: What We Are, What We Are Not     220
Pew Global Attitudes Polling     227
Notes     229
Acknowledgments     243
Index     247

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America Against The World 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JamieBowen0306 More than 1 year ago
"America Against The World" is a book written by two math nerds (they're opinion pollsters) that compares the American "self-view" to the "self-view" of Europeans, Africans, and Asians. The argument being that the rest of the world "doesn't get" America and it'd be interesting to find out why (or even if it's true). It's an interesting book that mostly rattles along at a fair old pace. Through its' chapters it points out that American religiosity makes them more like third world countries than their European neighbours for example. It also notes that every country thinks that they're better than everywhere else, but that American "exceptionalism" (which is the scientific word for thinking "we're the best") is more obvious because they're the sole super power (I mean, in the greater scheme of things who'll care if Lesotho thinks "We're it?"). The book, however, isn't perfect. First, it's written by math nerds, and it can read like it's written by maths guys in places. Don't get me wrong, I like maths, but you wouldn't get an insurance instructor to write poetry for you would you? Secondly, it described American as the world's oldest democracy, which irritated me some. Now I like the Constitution and think the Bill of Rights is pretty neat, but the Americans had "founding fathers" that viewed African-Americans as "less" because they were black, and allowed the white population to own other members of the human race, which isn't very democratic to my mind (and is something that was wiped out in the UK much earlier). Finally the book does a good job of how American is different, but doesn't explain why anything is as it is, in anything but the most simplistic terms. This irritated me because while you might argue that that isn't the point of the book, the why of difference is more important than the how, so I'd've like to have seen more work on that area.