America By River And Rail

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. BOSTON. Saturday, March 3.—We met at breakfast at half-past eight, and made the acquaintance of buckwheat cakes and molasses. Then to the monument on Bunker's Hill. We took a wrong bridge, and got to the Cambridge ...
See more details below
Sending request ...

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. BOSTON. Saturday, March 3.—We met at breakfast at half-past eight, and made the acquaintance of buckwheat cakes and molasses. Then to the monument on Bunker's Hill. We took a wrong bridge, and got to the Cambridge side, but easily found a road and bridge leading to Charleston, where Bunker's Hill is. This part of the town is quite intersected by railways. These cross the streets in all directions on the level, and are in most cases without any protection. A sign-board, stretched full in front across the whole breadth of the street, bears the legend, " Railway crossing.—Look out for the engine while the bell is ringing ;" and, in addition to this, a gate is, in some instances, shut across the street while a train is passing. The onus of responsibility seems to be thrown as much as possible on the unlucky passenger. Should he get smashed after the above-mentioned admonition, he is supposed to be himself to blame. The American engine and car are both very different from ours. The locomotives are much larger, and have three striking peculiarities. The chimney or smoke- stalk is in the shape of a great inverted cone, the object of the broad top being to hold an arrangement for preventing pieces of burning wood blowing out. This BOSTON. 11 huge chimney is balanced by a house at the opposite end for the drivers. Without such a protection they could not stand either the summer heat or the winter cold of this climate. The third peculiarity is in the arrangement of the wheels. Thedriving wheels, varying in number from two to four pairs, are placed together behind, while in front two pairs of small wheels support a swivel platform beneath the engine,—an arrangement introduced to give facility in turning. The carriages, or cars, as they are called, are similarly s...
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217679060
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/16/2009
  • Pages: 134
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.29 (d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. BOSTON. Saturday, March 3.We met at breakfast at half-past eight, and made the acquaintance of buckwheat cakes and molasses. Then to the monument on Bunker's Hill. We took a wrong bridge, and got to the Cambridge side, but easily found a road and bridge leading to Charleston, where Bunker's Hill is. This part of the town is quite intersected by railways. These cross the streets in all directions on the level, and are in most cases without any protection. A sign-board, stretched full in front across the whole breadth of the street, bears the legend, " Railway crossing.Look out for the engine while the bell is ringing ;" and, in addition to this, a gate is, in some instances, shut across the street while a train is passing. The onus of responsibility seems to be thrown as much as possible on the unlucky passenger. Should he get smashed after the above-mentioned admonition, he is supposed to be himself to blame. The American engine and car are both very different from ours. The locomotives are much larger, and have three striking peculiarities. The chimney or smoke- stalk is in the shape of a great inverted cone, the object of the broad top being to hold an arrangement for preventing pieces of burning wood blowing out. This BOSTON. 11 huge chimney is balanced by a house at the opposite end for the drivers. Without such a protection they could not stand either the summer heat or the winter cold of this climate. The third peculiarity is in the arrangement of the wheels. The driving wheels, varying in number from two to four pairs, are placed together behind, while in front two pairs of small wheels support a swivel platform beneath the engine,an arrangement introduced togive facility in turning. The carriages, or cars, as they are called, are similarly s...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)