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American Business Values: With International Perspectives / Edition 4
     

American Business Values: With International Perspectives / Edition 4

by Gerald F. Cavanagh, Charles T. Fisher, S. J. Cavanagh
 

ISBN-10: 0135182344

ISBN-13: 9780135182345

Pub. Date: 06/06/1997

Publisher: Prentice Hall

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780135182345
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication date:
06/06/1997
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
314
Product dimensions:
5.99(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.51(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
CHAPTER 1 A Free Market for Ethical Values
1(37)
Freedom and Markets
3(1)
Living for Today
3(5)
Debt and consumption
4(1)
Restructuring the firm
5(3)
Mergers and Speculation
8(5)
Golden parachutes and greenmail
11(1)
Institutional investors
12(1)
Insider trading
12(1)
Management Self-Interest
13(4)
Public confidence in corporations and executives
14(1)
Sexual harassment
14(2)
Pollutants and police
16(1)
Advertising, Media, and Global Firms Shape Values
17(11)
Advertising affects values
20(1)
Global firms: Corporate citizens of the world
21(1)
New horizons for global business
22(4)
Influence of global firms
26(2)
Values of Free Enterprise
28(2)
Self-interest as a goal
28(2)
Individualism, commitment, and community
30(1)
Summary and Conclusions
31(1)
Discussion Questions
32(1)
Exercise: Personal Values and Life Goal Inventory
33(3)
Rank ordering of personal values
34(1)
Life goal inventory
34(2)
Case: College Test
36(1)
Case: Confidentiality of Electronic Mail
36(2)
CHAPTER 2 Maturity and Moral Development
38(31)
Lack of Maturity Brings Stress
39(4)
Midlife crisis
39(2)
Stress and illness
41(2)
Moral Development
43(10)
Stages of moral growth
45(2)
Reasoning and caring in moral development
47(2)
Individualism and the common good
49(3)
Leaders build shared values
52(1)
Personal Values of Businesspeople
53(4)
Measuring personal values
54(1)
Personal experience gives direction
55(1)
Helping behavior
56(1)
Need for Ethics in Business
57(8)
Corporate pressure or personal greed
59(2)
Enlightened self-interest and ethics
61(1)
Taste, bias, and culture
62(1)
Young people and morals
63(1)
Response of business and business schools
64(1)
Summary and Conclusions
65(1)
Discussion Questions
66(1)
Exercise: Ethical Climate of an Organization
67(1)
Case: Drug Test
68(1)
Case: Bank Deposit Insurance
68(1)
CHAPTER 3 Ethical Behavior in Business
69(37)
Facts, Values, and Acts
70(3)
Dilemmas to decisions
71(1)
The actions of other people
72(1)
Ethical Norms for Business Decisions
73(10)
The norm of individual rights and duties
74(4)
The norm of justice
78(2)
The norm of utilitarianism
80(1)
The norm of caring
81(1)
Ethical norms for global business
82(1)
Solving Ethical Problems
83(9)
Decision making using the model
85(1)
Overriding factors
86(2)
Case of selling cigarettes
88(1)
Loyalty and whistle-blowing
89(1)
When to blow the whistle
90(1)
Good Habits Create Virtue
92(7)
The principal virtues
95(2)
Choosing to support virtue in the organization
97(2)
Ethics in Business Education
99(3)
Summary and Conclusions
102(1)
Discussion Questions
103(1)
Exercise: Memo to the Chief Executive
104(1)
Exercise: Service-Learning in Community
104(1)
Case: Double Expense Account
105(1)
Case: Tax Assessment Kickback
105(1)
CHAPTER 4 Historical Roots of Business Values
106(29)
Questioning the Past
107(1)
Listening to Our Forebears
108(14)
The ancient greek attitude toward business and work
108(2)
Work in biblical times
110(1)
Monks as capitalists
111(3)
From Luther and Calvin to the Protestant ethic
114(2)
Weber's analysis of the Protestant ethic
116(2)
John Locke and the right to private property
118(1)
Rousseau's social contract
119(1)
Adam Smith's capitalist manifesto
119(3)
Foundation for Enterprise Values
122(10)
Benjamin Franklin's way to wealth
124(2)
The American frontier
126(1)
Tocqueville's view of Americans
126(3)
Social Darwinism and Herbert Spencer
129(2)
Struggle for survival
131(1)
Summary and Conclusions
132(1)
Discussion Questions
133(1)
Case: Tax-Free Camera
134(1)
Case: Radar Detector
134(1)
CHAPTER 5 Factories, Immigrants, and Ideology
135(30)
The Protestant Ethic and Business Practices
136(12)
American individualism Ralph Waldo Emerson style
138(1)
Children and immigrants in nineteenth-century factories
139(2)
Establishment churches and business
141(2)
Praise of acquisitiveness and wealth
143(1)
Manufacturing and scientific management
144(2)
Biased management
146(1)
Americans as seen from abroad
146(2)
Ideology and Values
148(11)
Origin and impact of ideology
150(2)
Challenge brings understanding
152(1)
Suspicion of ideology
153(1)
Values in modern life
154(5)
The Necessity of an Ideology for Business
159(2)
Summary and Conclusions
161(1)
Discussion Questions
162(1)
Case: Educational Reimbursement
163(1)
Case: Safe Drug
164(1)
CHAPTER 6 Critics of Free Enterprise
165(30)
The Marxist Critique
167(14)
Exploitation of the worker
168(2)
Alienation of the worker
170(2)
Big business dominates national goals
172(2)
Corporations exploit other countries
174(3)
Social consequences of capitalism
177(2)
Cooperative versus competitive market system
179(2)
Free Enterprise Questioned from Within
181(5)
Schumpeter's prediction of the decay of capitalism
182(1)
Argument for free markets: A rebuttal
183(3)
Alternatives to Individualism and Capitalism: Cooperatives
186(5)
Communities to aid others
187(1)
Shared values in a community
188(2)
Cooperation in the workplace
190(1)
Summary and Conclusions
191(1)
Discussion Questions
192(1)
Exercise: International Management Consultant
192(1)
Procedure
193(1)
Case: California Sweatshop
193(1)
Case: Superior's Expense Report
194(1)
CHAPTER 7 Personal Values Within the Firm
195(32)
The Organization's Formative Influence: Socialization
198(10)
Accomplishment and loyalty at work
200(2)
Money as the goal
202(2)
Winners and self-developers among managers
204(2)
Dissent in the organization
206(2)
Why People Work: Motivation and Ideology
208(8)
Personal growth within the organization
209(1)
Self-actualization
210(1)
Need for achievement and power
211(3)
Work is natural
214(1)
Moving blindly with unexamined assumptions
215(1)
Sources of Satisfaction and Pressure to Perform
216(7)
Following orders
218(1)
Selling of self: Careerism
219(2)
Loving, caring, and decisiveness
221(1)
Chief executives as leaders
221(2)
Summary and Conclusions
223(1)
Discussion Questions
224(1)
Exercise: Write Your Own Obituary
225(1)
Case: The Purchasing Manager's Car
225(1)
Case: Local Manager in Trouble
226(1)
CHAPTER 8 Ethics and Performance Measures
227(36)
Managing for Self or Team
228(5)
Executive compensation and trust
229(3)
American supremacy challenged
232(1)
Leadership Determines Ethics and Values
233(12)
Executives as moral leaders
235(6)
Executives and firms that pursue self-interest
241(4)
Ethics for Strategic Planning
245(14)
Role and responsibilities of CEO and board of directors
247(1)
A code of ethical conduct
248(2)
A global code of ethical conduct
250(2)
Planning for ethics and disclosure
252(1)
Social audits, ethics officers, and ethics training
253(3)
The influence of institutional investors
256(2)
Growth and narrow interests
258(1)
Summary and Conclusions
259(1)
Discussion Questions
260(1)
Exercise: Business for Social Responsibility
261(1)
Case: Ebola Virus and Entertainment
261(1)
Case: Stock Purchase Deal
262(1)
Case: Company Controller
262(1)
CHAPTER 9 Business Values for the Future
263(33)
Today's Business Values
264(5)
Free markets triumph
264(1)
Aristocratic markets
265(1)
Threat of special interests to democracy
266(1)
Lack of clear values
267(1)
An aid to core beliefs and the work ethic
268(1)
A Viable Business Creed
269(7)
Problems for future managers
270(1)
Mission statement and core ideology
271(2)
A spiritual business vision
273(3)
Planning and Forecasting
276(2)
Organizing for the future
276(1)
Trend analysis
277(1)
Careers with a future
277(1)
Future Business Values
278(14)
Central role of the person
278(2)
Participation in management decisions
280(1)
Sustainable development
281(2)
Long-range perspective
283(1)
Business as a servant of society
283(2)
Technology and innovation
285(1)
A nation among nations
286(1)
Harmony with the environment
287(1)
Local control: Small is beautiful
287(1)
Spiritual roots of the new business mission
288(2)
Concern for others
290(1)
New measures of success
290(1)
Vision and hope
291(1)
Summary and Conclusions
292(1)
Discussion Questions
293(1)
Case: America's Most Admired Corporations
294(1)
Case: Business Decisions and Religion
294(2)
APPENDIX Caux Round Table Principles for Business 296(9)
Index 305

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