American Colonies: The Settling of North America (The Penguin History of the United States, Volume 1)

American Colonies: The Settling of North America (The Penguin History of the United States, Volume 1)

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by Alan Taylor, Eric Foner
     
 

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In the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner,  Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to

Overview

In the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner,  Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to the Pacific coast.

Transcending the usual Anglocentric version of our colonial past, he recovers the importance of Native American tribes, African slaves, and the rival empires of France, Spain, the Netherlands, and even Russia in the colonization of North America. Moving beyond the Atlantic seaboard to examine the entire continent, American Colonies reveals a pivotal period in the global interaction of peoples, cultures, plants, animals, and microbes. In a vivid narrative, Taylor draws upon cutting-edge scholarship to create a timely picture of the colonial world characterized by an interplay of freedom and slavery, opportunity and loss.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Compelling, readable, and fresh, American Colonies is perhaps the most brilliant piece of synthesis in recent American historical writing." —Phillip J. Deloria, associate professor of history and American culture, University of Michigan

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101075814
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/30/2002
Series:
Penguin History of the United States , #1
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
544
Sales rank:
140,166
File size:
6 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Compelling, readable, and fresh, American Colonies is perhaps the most brilliant piece of synthesis in recent American historical writing." —Phillip J. Deloria, associate professor of history and American culture, University of Michigan

 

Meet the Author

Alan Taylor’s books include William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic, which won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for history and the Bancroft Prize in American History, and The Internal Enemy. Taylor hold the Thomas Jefferson Chair in American History at the University of Virginia.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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American Colonies: The Settling of North America (the Penguin History of the United States, Volume1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent work that covers all of the European colonies in the New World. It shows the reasons why immigrants left Europe for a better life, and the views of both the immigrants and colonists and their differing views of the world. The BEST work on the colonization of the Americas that I have read
Guest More than 1 year ago
The study of Colonial America has always been one of the most neglected eras of American History, save for the period immediately preceeding the Revolution. Mr. Taylor, who has a gift of synthesizing a great deal of information into very readable sections, has chosen various episodes in Colonial America wisely and writes with almost the same readability of Francis Parkman. No myths here, Mr. Taylor gives us the reality of the 'conquest' of North America. Moreover, the destruction of the Native American population, particularly the area of Peru and Mexico, were chilling.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
'American Colonies' by Alan Taylor is a fresh, informative synthesis of often overlooked aspects of post-Columbian North America. It emphasizes the English colonies, dividing its attention more or less equally between the northern, southern, and middle colonies. But unlike most American historians, the author doesn't exclude the many non-English inhabitants of North America from his book. Taylor tells the stories of the Spanish missions in Florida and the Southwest, of the French colonies in Canada and Louisiana, of the Russian hunters in Alaska, and of the Dutch trading posts in what would become New York. Much space is devoted to social developments: Native American cultures and customs, the Great Awakenings, the Canadian siegneurs, Southern aristocracy, slave conditions, French relations with the Indians, etc. The coverage is comprehensive, detailed, and organized, with each chapter split into several branches of the chapter's subject. I have only three quibbles: '1' the author's prosaic, humorless style '2' the abrupt ending that lacks a conclusion and '3' the absence of citations, even for quotes. The superb further reading section, however, compensates for this last shortcoming. All in all, 'American Colonies' is an informative and enlightening history. Readers who want to transcend the Anglocentricity of most history books will find 'American Colonies' particularly interesting. I highly recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book. The author strandles the line between a traditional interpretation and the 'peripheral-centric' interpretations of history to explore the heart of the exchange of materials and ideas between cultures. His thoughts on what the colonial period actually consisted of with respect to time-frame were also thought provoking.
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Massattorney More than 1 year ago
I find it laughable that thw overview of this book proudly notes how Taylor avoids an 'Anglocentric' perspective with respect to the coloniation of America. The implication being tht the Native American perspective is more salient, apparently. It is of course important. However, when one considers that the true 'colonization' of America began around 20,000 years or more, this becomes a near absurdity. Worse yet, given the mounting evidence for the Soloutrean theory (i.e. that Eastern America was inhabited 20k years ago or more by seaborn migrants from Europe who traveled along the then existing Atlantic ice cap) it becomes all the more absurd.