The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation And Human Rights

The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation And Human Rights

by Robin Blackburn
     
 

How slavery shaped the market economy and abolitionists gave us our idealsSee more details below

Overview

How slavery shaped the market economy and abolitionists gave us our ideals

Editorial Reviews

Stanley Engerman
“A marvelous book—insightful and stimulating.”
Stephen Howe - Independent
“Poses a challenge for the political future as well as a bold reappraisal of the historical past.”
From the Publisher
‘Robin Blackburn has already secured his position as Britain’s pre-eminent historian of slavery. This new volume confirms that position. It is an important contribution to our understanding of the shaping of the modern western world.’
James Walvin, BBC History Magazine

‘Blackburn describes emancipation in all its vexed, indeterminate grandeur,
propelled by violent clashes, public debate, harrowing exposés, and the consolidation of new notions of freedom and equality.’ Greg Grandin, Guardian

‘Blackburn writes authoritatively across centuries and continents.’
Joseph P. Reidy, Journal of American History

‘Poses a challenge for the political future as well as a bold reappraisal of the historical past.’ Stephen Howe, Independent

‘A marvellous book – insightful and stimulating.’
Stanley Engerman, University of Rochester

‘A magisterial history of transatlantic slavery.’ Ian Thomson, TLS

BBC History Magazine - James Walvin
“This is a richly scholarly book … an important contribution to our understanding of the shaping of the modern world.”
Independent - Stephen Howe
“Poses a challenge for the political future as well as a bold reappraisal of the historical past.”
The Nation - Eric Foner
“The finest one-volume history of the rise and fall of modern slavery.”
Time Magazines Literary Supplement
“Magisterial history of transatlantic slavery.”
The Nation
The finest one-volume history of the rise and fall of modern slavery.— Eric Foner
Independent
Poses a challenge for the political future as well as a bold reappraisal of the historical past.— Stephen Howe
Times Literary Supplement
“Magisterial history of transatlantic slavery.”
BBC History Magazine
This is a richly scholarly book … an important contribution to our understanding of the shaping of the modern world.— James Walvin
Eric Foner - The Nation
“The finest one-volume history of the rise and fall of modern slavery.”
James Walvin - BBC History Magazine
“This is a richly scholarly book … an important contribution to our understanding of the shaping of the modern world.”
Publishers Weekly
This panoramic history, a follow-up to the author's The Making of New World Slavery, puts slavery—and the fight against it—at the heart of modernity. Historian Blackburn surveys the institution in the Americas from the Spanish conquest to late–19th-century abolition, from Caribbean sugar islands to the American cotton belt, and assigns it a prominent and conflicted role in Western history. Slavery, he notes, thrived in a booming market economy yet contradicted its ideology of free labor; it gave slave-holding planters the power to demand freedom from imperial rule; its horrors provoked slave rebellions and an abolitionist movement that pioneered new conceptions of human rights and energized democrats, working-class radicals, and feminists, but left a legacy of racial hatred and exclusion. Though occasionally meandering and repetitive, Blackburn's narrative is lucid and readable and deftly integrates long-term trends with crises; his emphasis on the Haitian and French Revolutions, often slighted by Anglo-American histories, is especially useful. Blackburn strains in trying to make slavery the motor of early industrial capitalism, but his broad comparative approach, clear prose, and convincing interpretations make this a superb overview of the subject. (June)
The Guardian
Blackburn describes emancipation in all its vexed, indeterminate grandeur, propelled by violent clashes, public debate, harrowing exposés, and the consolidation of new notions of freedom and equality.— Greg Grandin
Greg Grandin - The Guardian
“Blackburn describes emancipation in all its vexed, indeterminate grandeur, propelled by violent clashes, public debate, harrowing exposés, and the consolidation of new notions of freedom and equality.”
Stephen Howe - The Independent
“Of the thousands of historians who have written about Atlantic slavery and its abolition, only a handful have ever given us a really original perspective on that vast subject. Even fewer have proposed a satisfying, or stimulating, general theory about it, an attempt at explaining the rise, fall and enduring consequences of the entire New World slave system across the centuries and continents. Robin Blackburn is prominent—even pre-eminent—among those few.”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781781681060
Publisher:
Verso Books
Publication date:
08/06/2013
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
520
Sales rank:
901,233
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.10(d)

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