American Foreign Policy : Past, Present, Future / Edition 4

American Foreign Policy : Past, Present, Future / Edition 4

by Glenn P. Hastedt
     
 

ISBN-10: 013083579X

ISBN-13: 9780130835796

Pub. Date: 06/30/1999

Publisher: Pearson Education

This annually updated reader is a compilation of current articles from newspapers,magazines,and journals,covering issues relating to the United States and the World: Stragetic Choices,Regional and Bilaterial Relations,and American Foreign Policy. A student Web site is designed to support Annual Editions titles.

Overview

This annually updated reader is a compilation of current articles from newspapers,magazines,and journals,covering issues relating to the United States and the World: Stragetic Choices,Regional and Bilaterial Relations,and American Foreign Policy. A student Web site is designed to support Annual Editions titles.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780130835796
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
06/30/1999
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
429
Product dimensions:
6.04(w) x 8.93(h) x 0.81(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xv
PART I THE GLOBAL CONTEXT OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 1(29)
CHAPTER 1 The Global Setting of American Foreign Policy
1(15)
Why the International System Matters
1(1)
Globalization
1(1)
What Type of International System Exists Today?
2(1)
The International System: Structural Constants
2(2)
Decentralization
2(1)
Self-Help System
3(1)
A Stratified Systnn
3(1)
The International System: Postwar Trends
4(6)
Diffusion of Power
4(2)
Issue Proliferation
6(1)
Actor Proliferation
6(3)
Regional Diversity
9(1)
The International System: Emerging Characteristics of the Post-Cold War World
10(4)
Plan of the Text
14(1)
Notes
14(2)
CHAPTER 2 The Emerging Foreign Policy Agenda
16(14)
Foreign Policy Problems
16(3)
Thinking about Foreign Policy Problems
17(2)
The National Interest
19(5)
The Evolving Foreign Policy Agenda
24(4)
Economic Development: From Producing Growth to Managing Capital Flows
24(1)
Covert Action: From Targeting Communists to Targeting International Crime Organizations
25(1)
Military Strategy: From Interstate War to Peacemaking and (Perhaps) Cyber-Warfare
26(1)
Arms Control From Limiting Nuclear Weapons to Controlling the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction
26(1)
Human Rights: From Political Rights to Social and Economic Rights?
27(1)
Summary and the Future
28(1)
Notes
29(1)
PART II THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 30(96)
CHAPTER 3 The American National Style
30(18)
Isolationism versus Internationalism
32(1)
Sources of the American National Style
33(2)
Patterns
35(5)
Unilateralism
35(2)
Moral Pragmatism
37(2)
Legalism
39(1)
Consequences of the American National Style
40(3)
A Revival of Wilsonianism?
43(2)
Summary and the Future
45(1)
Notes
46(2)
CHAPTER 4 Post-Vietnam U.S. Foreign Policy
48(36)
The Nixon (and Ford) Administration: Leaving Vietnam and Entering Detente
48(5)
Nixon's Foreign Policy Evaluated
52(1)
The Carter Administration: American Foreign Policy with a Purpose: Promoting Human Rights
53(6)
Carter's Foreign Policy Evaluated
58(1)
The Reagan Administration: A Renewed Cold War
59(7)
Reagan's Foreign Policy Evaluated
65(1)
The Bush Administration: Leaving the Cold War and Entering a New World
66(7)
Bush's Foreign Policy Evaluated
72(1)
The Clinton Administration: Into the Breach
73(9)
Clinton's Foreign Policy Evaluated
81(1)
Summary and the Future
82(1)
Notes
82(2)
CHAPTER 5 Learning from the Past
84(42)
How Do Policy Makers Learn from the Past?
84(2)
Events Policy Makers Learn From
86(1)
Types of Calculations Made about Those Events
87(1)
Lessons Learned
88(2)
Learning from the Past: Case Studies
90(32)
The Cold War
90(9)
Vietnam
99(9)
The Persian Gulf War
108(14)
Summary
122(1)
Notes
123(3)
PART III THE FOREIGN AFFAIRS GOVERNMENT 126(114)
CHAPTER 6 The Domestic Context of American Foreign Policy
126(35)
The Media and American Foreign Policy
127(6)
The Media and the Gulf War
131(2)
Public Opinion
133(7)
Trends and Content
134(4)
Public Opinion and the Use of Force
138(1)
Impact
139(1)
Elections
140(4)
Voter Knowledge and issue Voting
141(1)
Party and Candidate Differences
142(1)
Impact
143(1)
Interest Groups
144(9)
Types of Groups
147(5)
Impact
152(1)
Policy Maker Response
153(2)
An Example: U.S. Policy toward El Salvador
154(1)
Summary and Future Issues
155(3)
Notes
158(3)
CHAPTER 7 The Constitution and Foreign Affairs
161(21)
Treaty-Making Powers
161(8)
Senatorial Advice and Consent
161(3)
Executive Agreements
164(3)
The Role of the House and the Panama Canal Treaties
167(2)
Appointment Powers
169(2)
War Powers
171(3)
Commerce Powers
174(2)
Federalism and the States
176(2)
Summary and Future Issues
178(2)
Notes
180(2)
CHAPTER 8 The Presidency
182(16)
Presidential Personality
183(4)
When Does the Individual Matter?
186(1)
Presidential Bureaucracy
187(1)
The National Security Council
188(4)
Presidential Decision Making
192(2)
The Iran-Contra Initiative
192(1)
Bosnia
193(1)
Summary and Future Issues
194(2)
Notes
196(2)
CHAPTER 9 Congress and Foreign Policy
198(17)
Congressional Structure and Foreign Policy
198(7)
Blunt Foreign Policy Tools
198(4)
Decentralization
202(1)
Policy Entrepreneurship
203(1)
Staff Aids
204(1)
The Influence of Party and Region
205(1)
Foreign Policy Impact
206(3)
Congress and the President: The Changing Relationship
209(2)
Changes over Time
209(1)
Changes by Policy Area
210(1)
Summary and Future Issues
211(1)
Notes
212(3)
CHAPTER 10 The Foreign Affairs Bureaucracy
215(25)
The State Department
216(7)
Structure and Growth
216(2)
The State Department's Value System
218(4)
Foreign Policy Impact
222(1)
The Defense Department
223(5)
Structure and Growth
223(2)
The Defense Department's Value System
225(2)
Foreign Policy Impact
227(1)
The CIA and the Intelligence Community
228(6)
Structure and Growth
228(4)
The Intelligence Community's Value System
232(2)
Foreign Policy Impact
234(1)
The Domestic Bureaucracies: Treasury, Commerce, and Agriculture
234(2)
Summary and Future Issues
236(1)
Notes
237(3)
PART IV FOREIGN POLICY MAKING 240(44)
CHAPTER 11 Models of Policy Making: Overview
240(15)
The Rational Actor Model
241(1)
Bureaucratic Politics
242(3)
Small Group Decision Making
245(4)
Elite Theory and Pluralism
249(2)
Summary: Integrating Models
251(2)
Notes
253(2)
CHAPTER 12 Decision Making: Case Studies
255(29)
The Cuban Missile Crisis
255(6)
The Crisis: An Overview
255(3)
Three Views of the Cuban Missile Crisis
258(3)
The MX
261(8)
First Stages: A Bureaucratic Perspective
262(3)
Later Stages: A Pluralist Perspective
265(4)
The Alliance for Progress and the Caribbean Basin Initiative
269(7)
Alliance for Progress
270(3)
Caribbean Basin Initiative
273(3)
Negotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
276(5)
The Bargaining Phase
276(3)
The Ratification Phase
279(2)
Summary
281(1)
Notes
282(2)
PART V POLICY TOOLS 284(117)
CHAPTER 13 Diplomacy
284(20)
Selecting a Policy Instrument
284(2)
Bilateral Diplomacy
286(2)
Summit Diplomacy
288(3)
East-West Superpower Summits
289(1)
Western Economic Summits
290(1)
Conference Diplomacy
291(4)
GATT
291(2)
Helsinki Accords
293(1)
Environmental Conferences
294(1)
The Political Use of Force
295(3)
Arms Transfers
298(3)
Summary and the Future
301(1)
Notes
302(2)
CHAPTER 14 Covert Action
304(23)
Techniques of Covert Action
306(7)
Post-Cold War Covert Action
312(1)
Congress and the CIA
313(9)
Era of Trust
313(3)
Era of Skepticism
316(1)
Era of Uneasy Partnership
317(3)
Congress as Impatient Overseer
320(2)
Summary and the Future
322(3)
Notes
325(2)
CHAPTER 15 The Economic Instruments of Foreign Policy
327(21)
A Survey of Economic Instruments
328(6)
Economic Instruments: Three Case Studies
334(5)
Economic Warfare: Cuba and Iran
335(1)
Food Power: Grain
336(1)
Economic Sanctions in the Persian Gulf War
337(1)
Economic Sanctions Evaluated
338(1)
Foreign Aid
339(6)
Types of foreign Aid
340(1)
U.S. Foreign Aid: A Historical Overview
341(2)
Post-Cold War Foreign Aid
343(2)
Summary and the Future
345(1)
Notes
346(2)
CHAPTER 16 Military Power
348(31)
Development of U.S. and Soviet Nuclear Arsenals
349(2)
What Does It All Mean?
351(3)
A Historical Survey of U.S. Nuclear Strategy
354(5)
Post-Cold War Nuclear Strategy
359(5)
The U.S. Strategic Nuclear Arsenal
359(2)
U.S. Nuclear Strategy
361(1)
Current Issues
362(2)
Strategies for the Use of Conventional Military Force
364(6)
Post-Cold War Scenarios and Threat Assessments
365(5)
Issues in the Post-Cold War Use of Conventional Military Power
370(5)
Alliances and Coalitions
370(2)
The Post-Cold War Purposes of American Military Power
372(3)
The Nature of Post-Cold War Conflict
375(1)
Summary and the Future
375(1)
Notes
376(3)
CHAPTER 17 Arms Control and Missile Defense
379(22)
Success or Failure?
379(2)
A Historical Survey
381(6)
1946 to 1957
381(1)
1958 to 1972
382(1)
1973 to 1988
383(3)
1989 to 1992
386(1)
Defense
387(3)
The Strategic Defense Initiative
387(2)
Missile Defense Systems
389(1)
The Post-Cold War Agenda
390(8)
The Proliferation Challenge
390(1)
Why Proliferation?
391(1)
Policy Choices: Goals
391(2)
Strategies and Tactics
393(5)
Summary and the Future
398(1)
Notes
399(2)
PART VI CONCLUSION 401(14)
CHAPTER 18 Alternative Futures
401(14)
Alternative Futures
402(10)
The United States as an Ordinary State
402(1)
Reformed America
403(2)
The United States as a Global Manager
405(1)
Pragmatic America
406(1)
Neo-Containment
407(2)
Triumphant America
409(1)
America the Balancer
410(1)
Disengaged America
411(1)
The Future
412(1)
Notes
413(2)
Index 415

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >