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American municipal progress
     

American municipal progress

by Charles Zueblin
 

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This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940017926901
Publisher:
New York, MacMillan
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER in MUNICIPAL RAILWAY REGULATION The unregulated competition of earlier days has given way to unified systems of street railways. A satisfactory transportation service cannot be secured by competition. Every section of the city must bcprmectedwith every other section and with the suburbs. While no city has correlated all of its transportation units, some have consolidated their street railway lines. A few even have through routes, the only scientific way to serve a city. The inevitable result of monopoly has been municipal regulation. In the case of New York (Brooklyn Bridge railway), San Francisco, Seattle, Tacpma, and St. Louis the competition of municipal lines has been tried. Competition is antiquated, but has been forced on cities by their constitutional limitations. The competition of different kinds of services has of course continued. Steam railways and busses, elevated and subway systems, have invaded the. preserves of the trolley lines. Detroit runs auto park busses across the bridge and around Belle Isle Park, charging a three-cent fare in summer and five cents in winter.1 A new competitor of the trolley has appeared in the jitney. Haughty transportation magnates have suddenly become solicitous for the public weal. Unwonted courtesy is shown passengers and zeal is exhibited to make the streets safe. Municipalities have found it difficult to regulate the jitney. Although it has made serious inroads on trolley receipts it has not demonstrated its permanence. Hard times, an abundance of second-hand autos, and the arrogance of street railway magnates have produced epidemics of jitneyitis all over the country. 1 Over 600,000 passengers in iqi3 crossed the bridge and16,000 rode around the park. Nearly 45,000 park employees paid only one cent. Yet the enti...

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