American Political Cultures / Edition 1

American Political Cultures / Edition 1

by Ellis, Richard J. Ellis, Richard J.
     
 

ISBN-10: 0195111389

ISBN-13: 9780195111385

Pub. Date: 09/28/1996

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

This work challenges the thesis first formulated by de Tocqueville and later systematically developed by Louis Hartz, that American political culture is characterized by a consensus on liberal capitalist values. Ranging over three hundred years of history and drawing upon the seminal work anthropologist Mary Douglas, Richard Ellis demonstrates that American history

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Overview

This work challenges the thesis first formulated by de Tocqueville and later systematically developed by Louis Hartz, that American political culture is characterized by a consensus on liberal capitalist values. Ranging over three hundred years of history and drawing upon the seminal work anthropologist Mary Douglas, Richard Ellis demonstrates that American history is best understood as a contest between five rival political cultures: egalitarian community, competitive individualism, hierarchical collectivism, atomized fatalism, and autonomous hermitude.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195111385
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
09/28/1996
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
1,334,773
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.78(d)

Table of Contents

1Individualism and Community in American Life3
Individualism's Contemporary Critics5
Puritanism and Community8
Classical Republicanism, Commerce, and Civic Virtue12
Abolitionism, Perfectionism, and Competition16
Progressivism and the Public Interest20
The Paradox of Crusading Capitalism24
2Radical Lockeanism28
Interpreting Locke on Property29
Tom Paine: Constructing an Egalitarian Locke31
Radicalizing Locke in the Jacksonian Era33
The Radical Reconstruction of Locke35
Populism: Locked In?38
The End of History?41
3Rival Visions of Equality: Process Versus Results43
Merchants and Radicals in Revolutionary Philadelphia44
Democrats and Republicans in Antebellum America46
Populists and Entrepreneurs in the Gilded Age48
The Origins of American Exceptionalism: From Paine to Jackson49
The Populist Challenge to American Exceptionalism53
The New Left: A New American Exceptionalism?56
The Demise of American Exceptionalism: Redefining Discrimination59
4Competing Conceptions of Democracy63
Anti-Federalists and Federalists: Mirrors and Filters63
Jacksonians and Whigs: Delegates and Trustees67
The Contemporary Debate Over Participation69
"Our Practice of Your Principles"70
5An Anti-Authority Consensus?74
The Competing Antipower Ethics of Tom Paine and James Madison74
The Two Federalists78
The "Splendid Venom" of Wendell Phillips82
Stephen Douglas and Popular Sovereignty85
Exit, Voice, and Loyalty89
6Hierarchy in America95
Virginia's Gentlemen-Planters96
New England Federalists105
Mugwumps, Bosses, and Capitalists in the Gilded Age110
Hierarchy in Modern America114
7Fatalism in America: The Case of Slavery120
Slavery as Hierarchy121
Slaves as Fatalists122
Slaves as Individualists124
Slaves as Communitarians126
The Social Relations of Slavery129
Br'er Rabbit and Amoral Individualism131
Fatalism as a Rational Response to a Capricious Environment134
Fatalism and Freedom138
8A Life of Hermitude: Thoreau at Walden Pond140
"A little world all to myself"142
"My greatest skill has been to want but little"143
"Trade curses every thing it handles"144
"Such sweet and beneficent society in Nature"145
"Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in"146
"Read not the Times, Read the Eternities"147
The Hermit's Relationship to the Outside World148
9Culture, Context, and Consensus151
Classical Republicanism and Modern Liberalism152
Cultures in Context154
Conflict Within Consensus: The Theories of Samuel P. Huntington, Seymour Martin Lipset, and J. David Greenstone157
Explaining the Growth of Government: James Morone and the Democratic Wish162
The Subcultures of Daniel Elazar: Individualism, Traditionalism, and Moralism165
The American Jeremiad: From Consensus to Hegemony170
Culture: A Prism, Yes; A Prison, No174
Notes177
Index241

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