American Sign Language Concise Dictionary

American Sign Language Concise Dictionary

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by Martin L. Sternberg
     
 

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Introducing the first revised edition to the original and most extensive pocket-size American Sign Language dictionary ever published. Included are more than 2,500 of the most widely used words, phrases and idioms in the language, with easy-to-follow illustrations of the hand, arm and facial movements that express each one.

Completely updated and modernized, this

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Overview

Introducing the first revised edition to the original and most extensive pocket-size American Sign Language dictionary ever published. Included are more than 2,500 of the most widely used words, phrases and idioms in the language, with easy-to-follow illustrations of the hand, arm and facial movements that express each one.

Completely updated and modernized, this monumental work introduces 500 new signs that have recently been added to the evolving American Sign Language lexicon.

Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times
The most comprehensive and clearly written dictionary of sign language ever published.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062740106
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/28/1994
Edition description:
Revised Edition
Pages:
768
Sales rank:
506,164
Product dimensions:
4.18(w) x 7.00(h) x 1.53(d)

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Explanatory Notes


Sign Rationale

This term, admittedly imprecise semantically, refers to the explanatory material in parentheses which follows the part of speech. This material is an attempt to offer a mnemonic cue to the sign as described verbally. It is a device to aid the user of the dictionary to remember how a sign is formed.

Verbal Description

The sign and its formation are described verbally. Such terms as "S" hand, "U' position, "both 'B' hands," refer to the positions of the hand or hands as they are depicted in the American Manual Alphabet on page xxiii.

Terms such as "counterclockwise," "clockwise," refer to movement from the signer's orientation. Care should be taken not to become confused by illustrations which appear at first glance to contradict a verbal description. In all cases the verbal description should be the one of choice, with the illustration reinforcing it. The reader should place himself or herself mentally in the position of the signer, i.e., the illustration, in order to assume the correct orientation for signing an English gloss word.

Sign Synonyms

Sign synonyms are other glosses for which the same sign is used. They are found at the end of the verbal description, following the italicized Cf and are given in SMALL CAPITAL LETTERS.

It is important to remember that the words listed after the Cf. do not carry an equivalent sense in and of themselves. Because meaning for the signer springs from the sign, apparently unrelated glosses can be expressed by similar movements.

Illustrations

����A. Illustrations appearing in sequence should not be regarded as separate depictions of parts of a sign. They are fluid and continuous, and should be used in conjunction with the verbal description of a sign, for they illustrate the main features of the sign as one movement flows into the next.

����B. Arrows, broken or solid, indicate direction of movement. Again, they are designed to reinforce the verbal description and, where confusion may arise, the reader is cautioned to review the verbal description, always keeping himself or herself mentally in the position of the illustration (the signer).

����C. As a general rule, a hand drawn with dotted or broken lines indicates the sign's initial movement or position of the hand. This is especially true if a similar drawing appears next to it using solid lines. This indicates terminal position in the continuum.

����D. Groups of illustrations have been arranged as far as possible in visually logical order. They are read from left to right, or from top to bottom. Where confusion is possible, they have been captioned with letters A, B, C, etc.

����E. Small lines outlining parts of the hand, especially when they are repeated, indicate small, repeated, or wavy or jerky motions, as described in the verbal section of an entry.

����F. Arrows drawn side by side but pointing in opposite directions indicate repeated movement, as described in the verbal section of an entry.

����G. Illustrations giving side or three-quarter views have been so placed to afford maximum visibility and to avoid foreshortening problems. The user of the dictionary should not assume a similar orientation when making the sign. As a general fule, the signer faces the person he or she is signing to.

����H. Inclusion of the head in the figures permits proper orientation in the formation of certain signs. The head is omitted where there is no question of ambiguity.

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