American Taxation, American Slavery / Edition 1

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Overview

In American Taxation, American Slavery, Robin L. Einhorn shows the deep, broad, and continuous influence of slavery on America's fear and loathing of taxes. From the earliest colonial times right up to the Civil War, slaveholding elites feared strong and democratic government as a threat to the institution of slavery. Einhorn reveals how the heated battles over taxation, the power to tax, and the distribution of tax burdens were rooted not in debates over personal liberty but rather in the rights of slaveowners to hold human beings as property. Along the way, she exposes the antidemocratic origins of the enduringly popular Jeffersonian rhetoric about weak government, showing that state governments were actually more democratic-and stronger-where most people were free.

A strikingly original look at the role of slavery in the making of the United States, American Taxation, American Slavery will prove essential to anyone interested in the history of American government and politics.

About the Author:
Robin L. Einhorn is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226194875
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/2006
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 337
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Robin L. Einhorn is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833–1872, also published by the University of Chicago Press.
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Table of Contents

Prologue : taxation without representation 11

Pt. I Colonial tax systems 24

1 Virginia 29

2 Massachusetts 53

3 Variations 79

Pt. II National tax politics 110

4 The origin of the tariff 117

5 Direct taxes 157

Pt. III The synthesis in the states 200

6 Property taxes 207

Epilogue : James Madison on slave taxes 251

App How to talk about taxes 257

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    Excellent book

    An eye opening account of how the founding fathers designed our tax system to accomodate the institution of slavery.

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