American Woman's Home

American Woman's Home

by Catharine Beecher, Harriet Stowe
     
 

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Published in 1869 by the indomitable Beecher sisters, The American Woman's Home is remarkable for both its philosophy and its practicality. A pioneering work of scientific kitchen planning, the book's recommendation for specific work areas, built-in cupboards and shelves, and continuous work surfaces are ideals that, while new at the time, are taken for granted

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Overview

Published in 1869 by the indomitable Beecher sisters, The American Woman's Home is remarkable for both its philosophy and its practicality. A pioneering work of scientific kitchen planning, the book's recommendation for specific work areas, built-in cupboards and shelves, and continuous work surfaces are ideals that, while new at the time, are taken for granted today. The work presupposes a servantless home and teaches the homemaker basic skills on how to cope with such inventions as stoves and refrigerators, as well as providing information on healthful food and drink, care of the sick, and care of the home. While the few recipes included are mainly medicinal, this is an important work of social and food history.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429011112
Publisher:
Applewood Books
Publication date:
03/25/2008
Series:
Cooking in America Series
Pages:
524
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Catharine Esther Beecher was born on September 6, 1800 in East Hampton, New York to Roxana Foote and Reverend Lyman Beecher. A prominent educator and author, Beecher advocated for the rigorous education of women and for the elevation of their role within the domestic sphere. She was the author of numerous works on domestic management, founded five schools, and formed The American Woman's Educational Aossication (1852) and The Ladies Society for Promoting Education in the West. Catharine Beecher died in Emira, New York on May 12, 1878.

Harriet Beecher, born in Litchfield, CT in 1811, married Lane Theological Seminary professor and ardent critic of slavery Calvin Stowe in 1836. The Stowes supported the Underground Railroad, housing several runaway slaves in their home. Author of numerous fiction and non-fiction works, she is best known for “Uncle Tom's Cabin,” published in 1852.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
June 14, 1811
Date of Death:
July 1, 1896
Place of Birth:
Litchfield, Connecticut
Place of Death:
Hartford, Connecticut
Education:
Homeschooled

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