BN.com Gift Guide

American Women in the Progressive Era, 1900-1920

Overview

The period known as the Progressive Era, from 1900 to 1920, was one of radical change in America, particularly for women. The era saw the start and resolution of "the war to end war," the height of the temperance movement, and the heyday of muckraking journalism, and it culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment, giving American women the right to vote. American Women in the Progressive Era ties together all of the movements, moods, and milestones of this exciting period of change in America. It explores the...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $45.00   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(188)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(188)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The period known as the Progressive Era, from 1900 to 1920, was one of radical change in America, particularly for women. The era saw the start and resolution of "the war to end war," the height of the temperance movement, and the heyday of muckraking journalism, and it culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment, giving American women the right to vote. American Women in the Progressive Era ties together all of the movements, moods, and milestones of this exciting period of change in America. It explores the role of American women in World War I, the labor movement, and the struggle to win the vote, and it describes how women of all ethnic and social backgrounds were affected by their changing roles in these and other areas. To read the story of American women in the first two decades of the 20th century is to explore a period of change, as massive immigration, industrialization, and urbanization transformed the country. It is to learn of women coping with the changes so created, and of women themselves changing, moving more and more from the private to the public sphere. New labor-saving household devices freed women for paid or volunteer work outside their homes, and they began to see their responsibility to make not only their homes but also their communities, their states, even their nation fit places in which to live and raise children. In the process, millions of them discovered how much they needed and wanted the vote. This book describes in words and in pictures what was happening in the domestic lives of ordinary women, in their working lives (in and out of their homes), and in the ways they were expanding their roles, during a period bright with hope for a brave new world and distinguished by cross-class cooperation among women all over the nation. Readers will enjoy this thoroughly researched, lively book on women and their startling range of activities in the Progressive Era. American Women in the Progressive Era incorporates the words and expe
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
An examination of the political movements, social climate and historical changes experienced by women living in the first two decades of the 20th century. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Using evidence collected from published sources and some primary sources in the form of diaries and magazine and journal articles from the early 20th century, the Schneiders ( Sound Off! American Military Women Speak Out , Dutton, 1988, and Into the Breach: American Women Overseas in World War I , Viking, 1991) have produced a well-written survey of women in the Progressive era. At the beginning of this century, women participated in society's reform through changes in the definitions of housekeeping, family raising, and employment on the farm and in the factory. Through clubs, women learned organizational skills, which they applied to the reform movements in labor, suffrage, peace activism, war support, sexual protection, health and hygiene, and civil liberties. African Americans faced greater challenges in most of these areas. This work chronicles the lives of common women in the context of their public and private activities. Lynn's work, in contrast, employs a more traditional scholarly method. Taking up where the Schneiders leave off, in the post-World War I era, it examines the YWCA and the AFSC (Quakers/Society of Friends) as progressive organs. It discusses the reasons women were drawn to activism in the interwar period and the nature of their activism. It argues that the activities of many of these women laid the groundwork for 1960s feminism. Her book is based, in part, on oral interviews with women activists. Unlike the Schneiders' book, it requires a more sophisticated reader who possesses working definitions of such terms as ``Christian Left'' and ``Secular Left.'' Both books are highly recommended for scholars and lay readers alike. Together they complete a picture of Progressive women begun in Lori Ginzberg's Women and the Work of Benevolence (Yale, 1990) and Noralee Frankel and Nancy S. Dye's Gender, Class, Race, and Reform in the Progressive Era (Univ. Pr. of Kentucky, 1991).-- Jenny Presnell, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, Ohio
School Library Journal
YA-- The story of women's continuous struggle for equality during the early 20th century is presented in this well-researched book that offers copious statistics as documentation. Primary sources, diaries, letters, magazines, and photographs bring the era to life. A concise, crisp type on heavy paper makes the book easy to read. The detailed index is divided into subject subdivisions, and the bibliography is extensive. Source notes appear at the end of each chapter.
Booknews
A social history drawn from primary sources, describing the domestic lives of ordinary women, as well as their working lives both in and out of the home, during a period of massive immigration, industrialization, and urbanization that culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment, giving American women the right to vote. Includes 60 b&w photographs. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385472838
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/1/1994
  • Edition description: 1st Anchor Books ed
  • Pages: 288

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Dawning of an Age of Hope and Glory 1
Times of Change and Challenge 4
The Good Old Days? 7
The Progressive Dream 11
The Shifting Lives of Women 13
Ch. 2 Women at Work: Housekeeping, Homemaking, and Mothering 23
The Help-Less Housewife 23
Joy Through Household Machinery? 27
Who Cooks? Who Cleans? Who Babysits? 30
Life-Styles of Housewives 32
Enter the Expert - Preaching 37
The Grace Notes: Home Decoration, Personal Care, Recreation 41
Ch. 3 Women at Work: Outside the Home 49
Who Went Out to Work? 49
Who Did What? 51
Why Women Worked 52
Trends in Employment 54
The Work Experience: Farm Workers 54
The Work Experience: Factory Workers 56
Heaven Won't Protect the Working Girl. We Will! 61
Union Now? Ever? 64
"We Strike for Justice! We Don't Want to Waste Our Lives in Making Waists Only!" 67
Counter Arguments 71
Pink Collars and Coffee Cups 74
Professional Women 77
On Their Own 85
Ch. 4 Cleaning Up Society: Local, State, and National Housekeeping 93
The New Brooms 93
The Ladies of the Clubs 95
Womanpower Through Federation 98
New Business 100
An Organization for Every Purpose 103
The Settlement Movement 106
Ch. 5 Black Women on the Move 115
What They Faced 115
Taking Charge 117
The Northward Migration 121
Lifting as They Climbed 124
Separate and Unequal 126
"We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible" 129
Across the Boundaries 131
Ch. 6 How Are You Going to Keep 'Em Down? A Sexual Revolution? 137
The Oldest Profession 137
Social Purity 139
Sex and the New Woman 141
Just Say No 142
What Price Virtue? 144
Hi-Diddle-E-Dee, the Married Life for Me 145
Companionate Marriage 147
Children: To Be Or Not to Be? 151
Left to Their Own Devices 153
"Tell Jake to Sleep on the Roof" 154
Brought to Bed 157
Ch. 7 Votes for Women 165
The Red Rose 165
Who Needs the Vote? 168
Pulling Together - And Apart: NAWSA 171
Campaigning State by State 176
Pulling Together - And Apart: The National Woman's Party 179
"Help Mrs. Catt Put Rat in Ratification" 187
The Taste of Triumph 189
Ch. 8 Women's War Against War 195
Men and Women, War and Peace 195
Women Pacifists to the Front 196
The International Congress of Women 198
The Peace Ship 203
Against the Odds 205
Aftermath 207
Ch. 9 War Work: Not Just Tending to Their Knitting 211
War Fever 211
Volunteers for Uncle Sam - And for Humanity 213
Enforcing Purity 221
The American Way 223
New Jobs for Women 224
Binding Up the Wounds 230
To the Rescue 231
Ch. 10 Legacy 241
Re-Forming America 242
Exercising Power 243
The Quality of Life 245
Bibliography 249
Index 270
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)