Americanah [NOOK Book]

Overview

One of The New York Times's Ten Best Books of the Year

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction

An NPR "Great Reads" Book, a Chicago Tribune Best Book, a Washington Post Notable Book, a Seattle Times Best Book, an Entertainment Weekly Top Fiction Book, a Newsday Top 10 Book, and a...

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Americanah

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Overview

One of The New York Times's Ten Best Books of the Year

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction

An NPR "Great Reads" Book, a Chicago Tribune Best Book, a Washington Post Notable Book, a Seattle Times Best Book, an Entertainment Weekly Top Fiction Book, a Newsday Top 10 Book, and a Goodreads Best of the Year pick.

A powerful, tender story of race and identity by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Half of a Yellow Sun.

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland. 

Winner of the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction
One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of 2013

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
FIfemelu, the Nigerian expat and Princeton lecturer at the heart of this latest novel by Orange Prize winner Adichie (Half of a Yellow Sun), writes biting, dead-on blog posts taking aim at the cultural schism between non-African blacks, Africans, and everyone else. She also observes her Auntie Uju turning herself inside out to attract a man as Ifemelu's nephew silently accepts his mother's aspirations. Whether Ifemelu is writing a treatise on how to care for black hair or a scathing take on American students earning extra credit for bombast, her opinions bring her money and acknowledgment. But one day, as she is complimented on her nurtured American accent, Ifemelu senses that she has lost her way. A parallel plotline follows Obinze, the man Ifemelu left behind in Lagos, who emigrated to London and longs for a life in America with her. VERDICT Witty, wry, and observant, Adichie is a marvelous storyteller who writes passionately about the difficulty of assimilation and the love that binds a man, a woman, and their homeland. Her work should be read by anyone clutching at the belief that we're living in a post-racial United States.—Sally Bissell, Lee Cty. Lib. Syst., Estero, FL
The New York Times Book Review - Mike Peed
Adichie…is an extraordinarily self-aware thinker and writer, possessing the ability to lambaste society without sneering or patronizing or polemicizing. For her, it seems no great feat to balance high-literary intentions with broad social critique. Americanah examines blackness in America, Nigeria and Britain, but it's also a steady-handed dissection of the universal human experience—a platitude made fresh by the accuracy of Adichie's observations…Americanah is witheringly trenchant and hugely empathetic, both worldly and geographically precise, a novel that holds the discomfiting realities of our times fearlessly before us. It never feels false.
The Washington Post - Emily Raboteau
What's as American as the invention of race? Self-invention. So we are reminded by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's engaging third novel…Americanah is social satire masquerading as romantic comedy. There is mocking, but not without love…beyond race, the book is about the immigrant's quest: self-invention, which is the American subject. Americanah is unique among the booming canon of immigrant literature of the last generation…Its ultimate concern isn't the challenge of becoming American or the hyphenation that requires, but the challenge of going back home.
Publishers Weekly
Adichie burst onto the literary scene in 2006 with Half of a Yellow Sun, her searing depiction of the civil war in Nigeria. Her equally compelling and important new novel follows the lives of that country’s postwar generation as they suffer endemic corruption and poverty under a military dictatorship. An unflinching but compassionate observer, Adichie writes a vibrant tale about love, betrayal, and destiny; about racism; and about a society in which honesty is extinct and cynicism is the national philosophy. She broadens her canvas to include both America and England, where she illuminates the precarious tightrope existence of culturally and racially displaced immigrants. The friendship of Ifemelu and Obinze begins in secondary school in Lagos and blossoms into love. When Ifemelu earns a scholarship to an American college, Obinze intends to join her after his university graduation, but he’s denied a U.S. visa. He manages to get to London where his plight is typical of illegal immigrants there: he uses another man’s ID so he can find menial, off-the-grid work, with the attendant loss of dignity and self-respect. The final blow comes when he’s arrested and deported home. Ifemelu, meanwhile, faces the same humiliations, indignities, and privations—first in New York, then in Philadelphia. There, attending college, she’s unable to find a job and descends to a degrading sexual act in order to pay her rent. Later she becomes a babysitter for a wealthy white family and begins writing a provocative blog on being black in America that bristles with sharp, incisive observations about racism. Ifemelu writes that the painful, expensive process of “relaxing” kinky African hair to conform to cultural expectations brings black women dangerously close to self-hatred. In time the blog earns Ifemelu fame and a fellowship to Princeton, where she has love affairs with a wealthy white man and, later, an African-American Yale professor. Her decision to return home to Nigeria (where she risks being designated as an affected “Americanah”) is the turning point of the novel’s touching love story and an illuminating portrait of a country still in political turmoil. Announced first printing of 60,000. Agent: Sarah Chalfant, the Wylie Agency. (May 17)
From the Publisher
“Dazzling. . . . Funny and defiant, and simultaneously so wise. . . . Brilliant.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“A very funny, very warm and moving intergenerational epic that confirms Adichie’s virtuosity, boundless empathy and searing social acuity.”
—Dave Eggers, author of A Hologram for the King

“Masterful. . . . An expansive, epic love story. . . . Pulls no punches with regard to race, class and the high-risk, heart-tearing struggle for belonging in a fractured world.”
O, The Oprah Magazine

“[A] knockout of a novel about immigration, American dreams, the power of first love, and the shifting meanings of skin color. . . . A marvel.”
NPR

“A cerebral and utterly transfixing epic. . . . Americanah is superlative at making clear just how isolating it can be to live far away from home. . . . Unforgettable.”
The Boston Globe

“Witheringly trenchant and hugely empathetic . . . a novel that holds the discomfiting realities of our times fearlessly before us. . . . A steady-handed dissection of the universal human experience. ”
The New York Times Book Review

“Adichie is uniquely positioned to compare racial hierarchies in the United States to social striving in her native Nigeria. She does so in this new work with a ruthless honesty about the ugly and beautiful sides of both nations.”
The Washington Post

“Gorgeous. . . . A bright, bold book with unforgettable swagger that proves it sometimes takes a newcomer to show Americans to ourselves.”
The Dallas Morning News

“Part love story, part social critique, and one of the best [novels] you’ll read this year. . . . Characters are richly drawn. . . . Adichie digs in deeply, finding a way to make them fresh.”
Los Angeles Times

“Brave . . . Americanah tackles the U.S. race complex with a directness and brio no U.S. writer of any color would risk. . . . [The novel] brings a cleansing frankness to an old, picked scab on the face of the Republic. It’s not healing, and it’s not going away.” 
The Philadelphia Inquirer

“So smart about so many subjects that to call it a novel about being black in the 21st century doesn’t even begin to convey its luxurious heft and scope. . . . Capacious, absorbing and original.”
—Jennifer Reese, NPR

“One of the freshest pieces of fiction of the year. . . . Adichie’s style of writing is familiar and personal. . . . An engrossing, all-encompassing read.”
New York Observer

“Superb . . . Americanah is that rare thing in contemporary literary fiction: a lush, big-hearted love story that also happens to be a piercingly funny social critique.”
Vogue

“A near-flawless novel, one whose language so beautifully captures the surreal experience of an African becoming an American that one walks away with the sense of having read something definitive.”
The Seattle Times

“An important book . . . its strength and originality lie with the meticulous observation about race—about how embarrassed many Americans are about racial stereotypes, even as they continue to repeat them, about how casual racism still abounds.”
The Economist

“Moving.”
The Huffington Post

“[Americanah] presents a warm, digressive and wholly achieved sense of how African lives are lived in Nigeria, in America and in the places between.”
The Financial Times

“Glorious. . . . Americanah provide[s] Adichie with a fictional vehicle for all kinds of pithy, sharply sensible commentary on race and culture—and us with a symphonic, polyphonic, full-immersion opportunity to think outside the American box.”
Elle

“Winning . . . [Adichie] is a writer of copious gifts . . . breath[ing] life into characters whose fates absorb us. . . . She shows us ourselves through new eyes.”
Newsday

“Adichie defines the sum of disparate cultures with new clarity, while questions of identity and love remain elusive as ever.”
Interview magazine

Kirkus Reviews
A sensitive portrayal of distant love, broken affinities and culture clash by Nigerian novelist Adichie (Purple Hibiscus, 2003, etc.). Absence makes the heart grow fonder, it's said--but as often it makes the heart grow forgetful. Ifemelu, beautiful and naturally aristocratic, has the good fortune to escape Nigeria during a time of military dictatorship. It is a place and a society where, as a vivacious "aunty" remarks, "[t]he problem is that there are many qualified people who are not where they are supposed to be because they won't lick anybody's ass, or they don't know which ass to lick or they don't even know how to lick an ass." Ifemelu's high school sweetheart, Obinze, is too proud for any of that; smart and scholarly, he has been denied a visa to enter post-9/11 America (says his mother, "[t]he Americans are now averse to foreign young men"), and now he is living illegally in London, delivering refrigerators and looking for a way to find his beloved. The years pass, and the world changes: In the America where Ifemelu is increasingly at home, "postracial" is a fond hope, but everyone seems just a little bewildered at how to get there, and meanwhile, Ifemelu has to leave the safe, sheltered confines of Princeton to go to Trenton if she's to get her hair done properly. The years pass, and Ifemelu is involved in the usual entanglements, making a reunion with Obinze all the more complicated. Will true love win out? Can things be fixed and contempt disarmed? All that remains to be seen, but for the moment, think of Adichie's elegantly written, emotionally believable novel as a kind of update of Terry McMillan's Waiting to Exhale. Soap-operatic in spots, but a fine adult love story with locations both exotic and familiar.
The Barnes & Noble Review

Bitter over her failure to be taken seriously, Shan, a fictional African- American writer whom Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie places in New York, complains: "You can't write an honest novel about race in this country." Americanah is an attempt to do just that, with trenchant observations about social distinctions in not just one country, the United States, but Britain and Nigeria as well. Long: description: Bitter over her failure to be taken seriously, Shan, a fictional African- American writer whom Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie places in New York, complains: "You can't write an honest novel about race in this country." Americanah is an attempt to do just that, with trenchant observations about social distinctions in not just one country, the United States, but Britain and Nigeria as well. Adichie located her first two — award-winning — novels, Purple Hibiscus (2003) and Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), entirely within her native Nigeria. However, her third novel, set in three countries in three continents, is an affirmation of literary globalization. Like Open City (2011), which Teju Cole, who also divides his time between the United States and Nigeria, set in New York, Brussels, and Lagos, Adichie defies the glib categories of nationality. Does she belong to American literature? Nigerian? Americanah is cosmopolitan fiction that seeks universal truths in the particulars of three distinct cultures.

The novel begins in Trenton, New Jersey, in a braiding salon where Ifemelu has gone to get her hair done by African émigrées. After thirteen years in the United States, she will soon fly back to Nigeria. Though the narrative returns to the salon from time to time, much of Americanah takes the form of extended flashbacks to Ifemelu's childhood in Nigeria and her experiences in the United States. She moved to Philadelphia to study at a place called Wellson College, supporting herself through menial jobs she used a borrowed Social Security card to qualify for. After graduation, she lives with a rich white boyfriend in Baltimore and, after breaking up with him, an African-American professor in New Haven. A fellowship at Princeton brings her to the braiding salon in Trenton. The novel also recounts the experiences of Ifemelu's high school sweetheart, Obinze, as he struggles to make a living in London and avoid deportation. He fails at both but, with the help of a crooked tycoon called Chief, becomes rich and respected back in Lagos. After about 400 pages of back-story, Adichie is ready to move Ifemulu out of the hair salon and back to Lagos, where the plot turns increasingly sudsy: Though Obinze has acquired a beautiful and supportive wife and a darling daughter, he and Ifemelu are still passionately in love.

In the United States, Ifemelu becomes an Internet celebrity by writing a popular blog called Raceteenth or Various Observations About American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negroes) by a Non- American Black. Though its stated focus is on what it calls the four kinds of American tribalism, "class, ideology, region, and race," for Ifemelu, the first of these is race. "I did not think of myself as black," she says, "and I only became black when I came to America." As an outsider, an American African, Ifemelu — and, through her, Adichie — notices nuances in the relations between and within what the culture calls races that even African Americans take for granted. Back in Lagos, she becomes an "Americanah," a returnee who is more attentive to Nigerian mores than are friends who stayed behind. In London, Obinze experiences race differently, colored by English concern with class. At a posh party in Islington, a fellow Igbo observes, "It seemed to me that in America blacks and whites work together but don't play together, and here blacks and whites play together but don't work together."

Americanah is filled with such provocative aperçus and vivified by its awareness that not all people of African origin speak with the same voice — though all share euphoria in the election of Barack Obama. It provides white American readers the privilege of eavesdropping on the conversations of Africans, African Americans, and African Britons of a variety of backgrounds and personalities. Ifemelu's encounters with tipping ("a forced and efficient bribing system"), American football ("just overweight men jumping on top of one another"), and depression ("We don't talk about things like depression in Nigeria") defamiliarize features of the American cultural landscape. When she hears sentences such as "You shouldn't of done that. There is three things. I had a apple. A couple days. I want to lay down," a reader might conclude, with Ifemelu: "These Americans cannot speak English."

Though Ifemelu dismisses Huckleberry Finn as "unreadable nonsense," she bonds with Obinze over James Hadley Chase's thrillers. Obinze does not share her enthusiasm for Graham Greene's 1948 novel The Heart of the Matter, but she explains: "It's real literature, the kind of human story people will read in two hundred years." Not quite that kind of human story, Americanah, which might have benefited from judicious pruning, will do for the next couple of years. It provides a long and soapy immersion in distinctive lives lived here and now.

Steven G. Kellman is a professor of comparative literature at University of Texas at San Antonio, where he has taught since 1976. His most recent book is Redemption: The Life of Henry Roth (2005).

Reviewer: Steven G. Kellman

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307962126
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/14/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 1,445
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the author of Purple Hibiscus, which was longlisted for the Booker Prize, Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction; and acclaimed story collection The Thing Around Your Neck. Americanah, was published around the world in 2013, received numerous awards and was named one of New York Times Ten Books of the Year. A recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.


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Read an Excerpt

Princeton, in the summer, smelled of nothing, and although Ifemelu liked the tranquil greenness of the many trees, the clean streets and stately homes, the delicately overpriced shops, and the quiet, abiding air of earned grace, it was this, the lack of a smell, that most appealed to her, perhaps because the other American cities she knew well had all smelled distinctly. Philadelphia had the musty scent of history. New Haven smelled of neglect. Baltimore smelled of brine, and Brooklyn of sun-warmed garbage. But Princeton had no smell. She liked taking deep breaths here. She liked watching the locals who drove with pointed courtesy and parked their latest model cars outside the organic grocery store on Nassau Street or outside the sushi restaurants or outside the ice cream shop that had fifty different flavors including red pepper or outside the post office where effusive staff bounded out to greet them at the entrance. She liked the campus, grave with knowledge, the Gothic buildings with their vine-laced walls, and the way everything transformed, in the half-light of night, into a ghostly scene. She liked, most of all, that in this place of affluent ease, she could pretend to be someone else, someone specially admitted into a hallowed American club, someone adorned with certainty.
 
But she did not like that she had to go to Trenton to braid her hair. It was unreasonable to expect a braiding salon in Princeton—the few black locals she had seen were so light-skinned and lank-haired she could not imagine them wearing braids—and yet as she waited at Princeton Junction station for the train, on an afternoon ablaze with heat, she wondered why there was no place where she could braid her hair. The chocolate bar in her handbag had melted. A few other people were waiting on the platform, all of them white and lean, in short, flimsy clothes. The man standing closest to her was eating an ice cream cone; she had always found it a little irresponsible, the eating of ice cream cones by grown-up American men, especially the eating of ice cream cones by grown-up American men in public. He turned to her and said, “About time,” when the train finally creaked in, with the familiarity strangers adopt with each other after sharing in the disappointment of a public service. She smiled at him. The graying hair on the back of his head was swept forward, a comical arrangement to disguise his bald spot. He had to be an academic, but not in the humanities or he would be more self-conscious. A firm science like chemistry, maybe. Before, she would have said, “I know,” that peculiar American expression that professed agreement rather than knowledge, and then she would have started a conversation with him, to see if he would say something she could use in her blog. People were flattered to be asked about themselves and if she said nothing after they spoke, it made them say more. They were conditioned to fill silences. If they asked what she did, she would say vaguely, “I write a lifestyle blog,” because saying “I write an anonymous blog called Raceteenth or Various Observations About American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negroes) by a Non-American Black” would make them uncomfortable. She had said it, though, a few times. Once to a dreadlocked white man who sat next to her on the train, his hair like old twine ropes that ended in a blond fuzz, his tattered shirt worn with enough piety to convince her that he was a social warrior and might make a good guest blogger. “Race is totally overhyped these days, black people need to get over themselves, it’s all about class now, the haves and the have-nots,” he told her evenly, and she used it as the opening sentence of a post titled “Not All Dreadlocked White American Guys Are Down.” Then there was the man from Ohio, who was squeezed next to her on a flight. A middle manager, she was sure, from his boxy suit and contrast collar. He wanted to know what she meant by “lifestyle blog,” and she told him, expecting him to become reserved, or to end the conversation by saying something defensively bland like “The only race that matters is the human race.” But he said, “Ever write about adoption? Nobody wants black babies in this country, and I don’t mean biracial, I mean black. Even the black families don’t want them.”
 
He told her that he and his wife had adopted a black child and their neighbors looked at them as though they had chosen to become martyrs for a dubious cause. Her blog post about him, “Badly-Dressed White Middle Managers from Ohio Are Not Always What You Think,” had received the highest number of comments for that month. She still wondered if he had read it. She hoped so. Often, she would sit in cafés, or airports, or train stations, watching strangers, imagining their lives, and wondering which of them were likely to have read her blog. Now her ex-blog. She had written the final post only days ago, trailed by two hundred and seventy-four comments so far. All those readers, growing month by month, linking and cross-posting, knowing so much more than she did; they had always frightened and exhilarated her. SapphicDerrida, one of the most frequent posters, wrote: I’m a bit surprised by how personally I am taking this. Good luck as you pursue the unnamed “life change” but please come back to the blogosphere soon. You’ve used your irreverent, hectoring, funny and thought-provoking voice to create a space for real conversations about an important subject. Readers like SapphicDerrida, who reeled off statistics and used words like “reify” in their comments, made Ifemelu nervous, eager to be fresh and to impress, so that she began, over time, to feel like a vulture hacking into the carcasses of people’s stories for something she could use. Sometimes making fragile links to race. Sometimes not believing herself. The more she wrote, the less sure she became. Each post scraped off yet one more scale of self until she felt naked and false.
 
The ice-cream-eating man sat beside her on the train and, to discourage conversation, she stared fixedly at a brown stain near her feet, a spilled frozen Frappuccino, until they arrived at Trenton. The platform was crowded with black people, many of them fat, in short, flimsy clothes. It still startled her, what a difference a few minutes of train travel made. During her first year in America, when she took New Jersey Transit to Penn Station and then the subway to visit Aunty Uju in Flatlands, she was struck by how mostly slim white people got off at the stops in Manhattan and, as the train went further into Brooklyn, the people left were mostly black and fat. She had not thought of them as “fat,” though. She had thought of them as “big,” because one of the first things her friend Ginika told her was that “fat” in America was a bad word, heaving with moral judgment like “stupid” or “bastard,” and not a mere description like “short” or “tall.” So she had banished “fat” from her vocabulary. But “fat” came back to her last winter, after almost thirteen years, when a man in line behind her at the supermarket muttered, “Fat people don’t need to be eating that shit,” as she paid for her giant bag of Tostitos. She glanced at him, surprised, mildly offended, and thought it a perfect blog post, how this stranger had decided she was fat. She would file the post under the tag “race, gender and body size.” But back home, as she stood and faced the mirror’s truth, she realized that she had ignored, for too long, the new tightness of her clothes, the rubbing together of her inner thighs, the softer, rounder parts of her that shook when she moved. She was fat.
 
She said the word “fat” slowly, funneling it back and forward, and thought about all the other things she had learned not to say aloud in America. She was fat. She was not curvy or big-boned; she was fat, it was the only word that felt true. And she had ignored, too, the cement in her soul. Her blog was doing well, with thousands of unique visitors each month, and she was earning good speaking fees, and she had a fellowship at Princeton and a relationship with Blaine—“You are the absolute love of my life,” he’d written in her last birthday card—and yet there was cement in her soul. It had been there for a while, an early morning disease of fatigue, a bleakness and borderlessness. It brought with it amorphous longings, shapeless desires, brief imaginary glints of other lives she could be living, that over the months melded into a piercing homesickness. She scoured Nigerian websites, Nigerian profiles on Facebook, Nigerian blogs, and each click brought yet another story of a young person who had recently moved back home, clothed in American or British degrees, to start an investment company, a music production business, a fashion label, a magazine, a fast-food franchise. She looked at photographs of these men and women and felt the dull ache of loss, as though they had prised open her hand and taken something of hers. They were living her life. Nigeria became where she was supposed to be, the only place she could sink her roots in without the constant urge to tug them out and shake off the soil. And, of course, there was also Obinze. Her first love, her first lover, the only person with whom she had never felt the need to explain herself. He was now a husband and father, and they had not been in touch in years, yet she could not pretend that he was not a part of her homesickness, or that she did not often think of him, sifting through their past, looking for portents of what she could not name.
The rude stranger in the supermarket—who knew what problems he was wrestling with, haggard and thin-lipped as he was—had intended to offend her but had instead prodded her awake.
 
She began to plan and to dream, to apply for jobs in Lagos. She did not tell Blaine at first, because she wanted to finish her fellowship at Princeton, and then after her fellowship ended, she did not tell him because she wanted to give herself time to be sure. But as the weeks passed, she knew she would never be sure. So she told him that she was moving back home, and she added, “I have to,” knowing he would hear in her words the sound of an ending.
 
“Why?” Blaine asked, almost automatically, stunned by her announcement. There they were, in his living room in New Haven, awash in soft jazz and daylight, and she looked at him, her good, bewildered man, and felt the day take on a sad, epic quality. They had lived together for three years, three years free of crease, like a smoothly ironed sheet, until their only fight, months ago, when Blaine’s eyes froze with blame and he refused to speak to her. But they had survived that fight, mostly because of Barack Obama, bonding anew over their shared passion. On election night, before Blaine kissed her, his face wet with tears, he held her tightly as though Obama’s victory was also their personal victory. And now here she was telling him it was over.
“Why?” he asked. He taught ideas of nuance and complexity in his classes and yet he was asking her for a single reason, the cause. But she had not had a bold epiphany and there was no cause; it was simply that layer after layer of discontent had settled in her, and formed a mass that now propelled her. She did not tell him this, because it would hurt him to know she had felt that way for a while, that her relationship with him was like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out.
 
“Take the plant,” he said to her, on the last day she saw him, when she was packing the clothes she kept in his apartment. He looked defeated, standing slump-shouldered in the kitchen. It was his houseplant, hopeful green leaves rising from three bamboo stems, and when she took it, a sudden crushing loneliness lanced through her and stayed with her for weeks. Sometimes, she still felt it. How was it possible to miss something you no longer wanted? Blaine needed what she was unable to give and she needed what he was unable to give, and she grieved this, the loss of what could have been.

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Reading Group Guide

The questions, discussion topics, and other material that follow are intended to enhance your group’s conversation about Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Acichie’s powerful, moving story of a young man and woman from Nigeria who trace the difficult paths of migration, exile, and homecoming in a rapidly changing, globalized world.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 33 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2013

    I loved this book! It was an interesting take on the experiences

    I loved this book! It was an interesting take on the experiences of African immigrants in the US and England regarding race and class distinctions. The love story was left without closure for me but hopefully that's left for the next book! Overall a great read, definitely worth getting. 

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2013

    As a white in rural America, I have had limited personal experie

    As a white in rural America, I have had limited personal experience with blacks except in traveling. But I have tried to understand the issues of race relations and cultural divides within our country and our world and seek ways to build bridges between the races. I have read lots of books from the perspective of other cultures, but this is the first I've read by a non-American black in America. I was amazed at the differences she noted between the Nigerian culture and the US culture in terms of how she felt as a black person. It is a work of fiction but the experiences she relates within this work are experiences she actually had to deal with when she came to America initially. Very fascinating!!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2013

    Very interesting book, lots of "blog" about race in Am

    Very interesting book, lots of "blog" about race in America which was a bit much for me bur I Love that it is a true portal of life aboard for
    people from third world country and the struggle for the one raise abroad and they crisis they deal with.
    Hard to put down. Thanks Ms Adichie

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2013

    Great read

    Chance to look at race and white privilege and immigration from a different perspective.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2014

    I am A 62 year old white guy...born and raised in America. My in

    I am A 62 year old white guy...born and raised in America. My inclination as it comes to race is to keep my mouth shut. What do I know of anyone else's experience. This book tells me of another's experience. And, how eye opening it is! 
    We live on a planet where anything is possible. What a joy it's been to read of all those possibilities and viewpoints. I loved this book for it's expansive teaching. I've learned a lot. I've learned, though, to keep my mouth shut....for I'm still not in a position to contribute. All I can say is, read this book and learn.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    This was a great read. As a middle-classed African American who

    This was a great read. As a middle-classed African American who works and lives in mainstream America, there were so many things I could identify with. I picked up a few things I can use in racial debates too.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 12, 2013

    Great book!! I fell in love with the modernism of the Ife's char

    Great book!! I fell in love with the modernism of the Ife's character at the beginning. It was like getting to know a new friend. Reading the pseudo blog post from Raceteenth gave the story a very personalized effect. You began to believe that Ife is not a figment of Adichie's imagination. There were times throughout the reading I found myself irritated with her choices and that made me appreciate her multi dimensional personality. Hoping for a sequel. Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie has a new reader, anxious to read her past and future works, Im sure I won't be disappointed.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2014

    Wow! Couldn't put it down!

    I received this in the mail just before leaving for England; it was a compelling read and opened my eyes to an experience with race that I can only imagine. Her voice will continue you be an important one as we are bombarded with the current suffering in Nigeria; she was one of the "lucky ones". A cross cultural exchange in a book club would have a great appeal to me. I an going to read her other works now.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    wonderful book

    very interesting story that expands your understanding of some very complicated issues.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2013

    This is the first book I have read by this author. Oh my gosh! L

    This is the first book I have read by this author. Oh my gosh! Loved it! Loved it! Loved it! It was a page turner. I read this book in one day my entire day off! could not put it down. The end was left to your imagination but I am hoping for a sequel. I like the fact that Ifem never did contact her hairdresser's boyfriend because of an emergency. The author could have easily addressed it but left it open which was a smart strategy because in reality that is exactly what would have happened. The negative. . too many blogs at the end of the book. I was wondering if the author had to submit a certain among of pages. Great book, well written a must have. (postedby Guyrn2)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2013

    I've read 3 of Chimamanda's books and frankly I didn't think I c

    I've read 3 of Chimamanda's books and frankly I didn't think I could be more impressed with the author than I already am. Well " Americanah" proved me wrong. It is an exceptional book. It feels like you are in the story and actually feel Ifem's experiences. I'm an non-American black myself and her references just hit home. I absolutely would recommend this book to all. It opens your eyes to so much issues we all choose to ignore just to be safe. I loved it!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2014

    Interesting book written from a great perspective !

    How does a young African feel about living in America?. Read this honest version

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  • Posted July 28, 2014

    Loved this book. It was one of those books where I slowed down m

    Loved this book. It was one of those books where I slowed down my reading pace so that I could savor it.  I was very surprised since I was not able to get into Half of a Yellow Sun. I put that book down halfway and never picked it up again. But I loved loved this book. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2014

    Disappointing

    Writing was disjointed. Had so much potential but never delivered. 200 pages less would have helped.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2014

    Though this is not as masterful as Half the Yellow Sun, it is st

    Though this is not as masterful as Half the Yellow Sun, it is still a book with a large, sweeping vista of landscapes and characters as Adichie follows her usually outspoken heroine from Nigeria to the United States and back again. Adichie seems to be at her best when writing conversations of groups of people; though mostly auditory in her descriptions, she creates vivid pictures for her readers. This may be an important book for many readers, as it may open up some blunt discussions of race. Highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2014

    Amazing Book

    I would recommend this book to everyone. It is such a great book and she is such an amazing author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Excellent anecdotes, rushed ending

    I loved the anecdotes about modern race issues in America, and the author's voice is addicting. However, I felt the ending was rushed and came together too easily for the journey the character has been on. This definitely isn't a page turner, but worth the time investment. I laughed out loud many times. Thank you Chimamanda for opening my eyes!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful Book!  Along with that Hector's Juice!

    Wonderful Book!  Along with that Hector's Juice!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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