Americans and their Forests: A Historical Geography

Americans and their Forests: A Historical Geography

by Michael Williams, Donald Worster, Alfred W. Crosby
     
 
The meaning of the forest in American history and culture is traced from its clearing and use from pre-European times to the present through its regrowth since the middle of the twentieth century.

Overview

The meaning of the forest in American history and culture is traced from its clearing and use from pre-European times to the present through its regrowth since the middle of the twentieth century.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Williams (history, Oxford) examines in this scholarly, well-written account the effects of settlement and industrial development on the Appalachian forest--a woodland which once spread almost without a break from the Atlantic seaboard to the Western plains. The process of deforestation was begun by the pioneers and continued by the ruthless logging operations of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; it was halted only by the forest conservation movement of the 1900s. Both a valuable resource and reference work in its field and a very readable overview of the American conservation movement. Highly recommended.-- Eleanor Maass Assocs . , New Milford, Pa.
Booknews
Describes and analyzes the clearing and use of the forest from pre- European times to the present, and traces the subsequent regrowth since the middle of the 20th century. Illustrated with woodcuts, photos, and some 100 maps and diagrams of patterns which evolved on the land. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
'Rare indeed is the privilege of reviewing a book that is destined to become a classic, but Michael Williams's Americans and Their Forests gives me just such an opportunity. Williams has written the definitive historical geography of the importance of forests in the life, livelihood, and landscape of the United States and the way in which our thinking about and our use of our forests have changed through time in response to our changing needs and ideals.' John Fraser Hart, Forest and Conservation History

'This magisterial work, ten years in the making, addresses the question, what happened to the forest that once covered so much of the United States? ... Scholars, ranging from geographers to agricultural and literary historians, will applaud Williams's reach of analysis and attention to detail.' John R. Stilgoe, The Geographical Review

'While there are a number of solid studies that chronicle the significance of the forest in American history, this meticulously researched, elaborately documented, and carefully written volume provides the most detailed assessment of the evolving economic, political, and cultural relationship between Americans and their timber resources ... The comprehensive nature of this study will establish it as a base point for further examination of the role of the forest in the growth and development of the United States.' Phillip Drennon Thomas, Journal of American History

'Michael Williams's Americans and Their Forests is rich in insights. Much more than a historical geography, as proclaimed by its subtitle, it explores the role of forests in American history, economics, literature and culture.' Norman Myers, The Times Literary Supplement

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521332477
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
04/28/1989
Series:
Studies in Environment and History Series
Pages:
624
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 1.97(d)

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