Americans in Paris, 1860-1900

Americans in Paris, 1860-1900

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by Kathleen Adler, Erica E. Hirshler, H. Barbara Weinberg, Erica Hirshler
     
 

As the center of the art world in the late nineteenth century, Paris was a magnet for American art students and artists. They flocked to the studios of French artists like Jean-Léon Gérôme, William Bouguereau, and others, dreamed of showing their work at the annual Paris Salon, and watched intently as new styles such as Impressionism began to take

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Overview

As the center of the art world in the late nineteenth century, Paris was a magnet for American art students and artists. They flocked to the studios of French artists like Jean-Léon Gérôme, William Bouguereau, and others, dreamed of showing their work at the annual Paris Salon, and watched intently as new styles such as Impressionism began to take hold. Hardly an American painter was unaffected by developments in Paris, and even those who chose not to study there wanted their work to be affirmed by French audiences and taste makers.
This beautifully illustrated book traces the role of American artists in Paris from the Salon des Refusés, in 1863, to the emergence of a uniquely American style of painting at the turn of the century. It includes iconic images by John Singer Sargent, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Mary Cassatt, and Winslow Homer, and by many other artists whose names and work were more widely known then than now.
Engaging essays written by notable scholars explore why artists were drawn to Paris, how they responded to what they found there, and what they retained of their experience. In addition, the significance of the Expositions Universelles, the French view of American artists in Paris, and the role these artists played in shaping the great American collections of modern French painting are discussed. Featuring more than 100 paintings, the essays are followed by artists’ biographies, an illustrated, annotated list of works, and a complete bibliography.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781857093018
Publisher:
National Gallery London
Publication date:
03/28/2006
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 11.96(h) x 1.01(d)

Meet the Author

Kathleen Adler is Director of Education at the National Gallery, London. Erica E. Hirshler is Croll Senior Curator of Paintings, Art of the Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. H. Barbara Weinberg is the Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. David Park Curry is Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and American Painting and Sculpture at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Rodolphe Rapetti is Chief Curator of Patrimony and Deputy Director at the Direction des Musées de France, Paris. Christopher Riopelle is Curator of Nineteenth-Century Paintings at the National Gallery, London.

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Americans in Paris, 1860-1900 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There was a time when serious American artists felt the need to travel to Europe's art centers to study in order to become validated as 'well-schooled' craftsmen. During the nineteenth century this was especially true, not only for painters, but also for composers, singers, writers and those in all branches of the arts. This superb catalogue celebrates the painters from America who studied in Paris from 1860 to 1900 and in examining their work the book also shows the influence of the remarkable teachers of the time - Jean-Léon Gérôme and William Bouguereau among them - and carries us through copious reproductions of paintings through the transformation of the 'Parisian school' into the unmistakably American look. Writers Kathleen Adler, Erica E. Hirshler, H. Barbara Weinberg, David Park Curry, Rodolphe Rapetti, and Christopher Riopelle offer insights as well as succinct historical documentation of the forty-year periods that saw the emergence of Impressionism and Modernism. They ably remind us of the important Salon des Refusés and its part in the beginning of a movement that would result in a distinctly American style. The book is rich in sharing the works of John Singer Sargent, James Abbott, James McNeill Whistler, Mary Cassatt, and Winslow Homer, Jefferson David Chalfant, John White Alexander, William Merritt Chase, Cecilia Beaux as well as others who were either directly or tangentially influenced by the French school. Though this book is not the first to address this period and influence it is certainly one of the better designed and catalogued of those available on the market today. For sheer pleasure of enjoying this fascinating group of painters this fine book is one of the best. Grady Harp