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America's Aces in a Day
     

America's Aces in a Day

by William N. Hess
 
In the history of aerial combat it is not uncommon to find stories of pilots who downed five or more enemy aircraft during their military careers, thus earning the title "Ace". Far less common are those pilots who accomplished this feat in a single day, often during a single mission! For the first time ever, renowned aviation author William Hess brings together the

Overview

In the history of aerial combat it is not uncommon to find stories of pilots who downed five or more enemy aircraft during their military careers, thus earning the title "Ace". Far less common are those pilots who accomplished this feat in a single day, often during a single mission! For the first time ever, renowned aviation author William Hess brings together the combat records of American pilots who achieved the status of Ace in a single day. Included are details of their combat victories taken from official records chronicled in debriefings immediately upon return from missions. Covers Navy, Marine and Air Force pilots and includes accounts from the Flying Tigers in 1941 through the raids on Japan in 1945. Includes a complete list of all U.S. pilots credited as achieving ace in a day status.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780933424623
Publisher:
Specialty Press Publishers & Wholesalers, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/28/1996
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
6.29(w) x 9.46(h) x 0.68(d)

Read an Excerpt

.....Just as the bombers went into their dives over the target, one of the Corsair pilots said, "Zeros spilled out of the clouds." Some forty to fifty Zeros came down and a huge air battle scattered over the sky. The fight lasted half an hour nd engaged most of the Marines from VMF-214.

Boyington was leading the first division of the Black Sheep, when the call went out that the enemy was coming down. However, he could see no aircraft around him. Immediately, he let down through a layer of clouds with his wingman, Lieutenant Don Fisher. As they began to circle, a Zero passed attempted to make a past on Boyington. He hit the Zero, which went into a slow roll to the left and down.

Left alone, Boyington was surprised to see a Zero pull alongside him and waggle its wings, signalling for him to join up. Somehow, the Japanese pilot had mistaken the Corsair for a friendly aircraft. Boyington closed to fifty yards and gave the Zero a solid burst. The enemy plane flared into flames and spun down......

.....Pappy climbed back up to 18,000 feet and spotted a zero making an attack on the right flank of the bombers. The Japanese pilot over shot his target and pulled up to about 11,000 feet, where the Corsair pilot pulled in behind him and opened fire from 300 yards. The enemy pilot pulled up in a loop with Boyington right behind him. As the Corsair circled onto its back, Boyington looked down and saw the Zero spinning down in flames.......

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