America's Economic Moralists: A History of Rival Ethics and Economics

America's Economic Moralists: A History of Rival Ethics and Economics

by Donald E. Frey, D. Frey
     
 

Since colonial times, two discernable schools have debated major issues of economic morality in America. The central norm of one morality is the freedom, or autonomy, of the individual and defines virtues, vices, obligations, and rights by how they contribute to that freedom. The other morality is relational and defines economic ethics in terms of behaviors

See more details below

Overview

Since colonial times, two discernable schools have debated major issues of economic morality in America. The central norm of one morality is the freedom, or autonomy, of the individual and defines virtues, vices, obligations, and rights by how they contribute to that freedom. The other morality is relational and defines economic ethics in terms of behaviors mandated by human connectedness. America's Economic Moralists shows how each morality has been composed of an ethical outlook paired with a compatible economic theory, each supporting the other. Donald D. Frey adopts a multidisciplinary approach, not only drawing upon historical economic thought, American religious thought, and ethics, but also finding threads of economic morality in novels, government policies, and popular writings. He uses the history of these two supported yet very different views to explain the culture of excess that permeates the morality of today's economic landscape.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791493519
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
02/12/2010
Pages:
247
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Chapter 1 Introduction 1

Chapter 2 Colonial Faith: Work, Wealth, and the Wider Welfare 13

Chapter 3 Acting for Self's Sake; The Later Colonial Era 25

Chapter 4 Laissez-Faire for Americans 35

Chapter 5 Ethics Better than the Morals of Hermits 49

Chapter 6 Religious Socialism: The Communal Moravians 61

Chapter 7 Abolition: Human Dignity as a boundary to Markets 75

Chapter 8 Social Darwinists of Different Species 87

Chapter 9 New Influences in Economics 101

Chapter 10 The Social Gospel and Catholic Thought Around 1900 115

Chapter 11 The 1920S and 1930S: depressed old values 131

Chapter 12 Too Agnostic. Too Certain: Welfare Economics, Chicago Economics 147

Chapter 13 Moralists of Twentieth-Century Capitalism 163

Chapter 14 Unconventional Alternatives to the Conventional Wisdom 177

Chapter 15 An Ecumenical Consensus on Economic Ethics 199

Chapter 16 Summary, Assessments, and a Projection 205

Notes 217

Works Cited 225

Index 233

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >