The Amish Midwife (Women of Lancaster County Series #1)

( 62 )

Overview

A dusty carved box containing two locks of hair and a century-old letter regarding property in Switzerland, and a burning desire to learn about her biological family lead nurse-midwife Lexie Jaeger from her home in Oregon to the heart of Pennsylvania Amish country. There she meets Marta Bayer, a mysterious lay-midwife who desperately needs help after an Amish client and her baby die.

Lexie steps in to assume Marta's patient load even as she continues the search for her birth ...

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The Amish Midwife (Women of Lancaster County Series #1)

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Overview

A dusty carved box containing two locks of hair and a century-old letter regarding property in Switzerland, and a burning desire to learn about her biological family lead nurse-midwife Lexie Jaeger from her home in Oregon to the heart of Pennsylvania Amish country. There she meets Marta Bayer, a mysterious lay-midwife who desperately needs help after an Amish client and her baby die.

Lexie steps in to assume Marta's patient load even as she continues the search for her birth family, and from her patients she learns the true meaning of the Pennsylvania Dutch word demut, which means "to let be" as she changes from a woman who wants to control everything to a woman who depends on God.

A compelling story about a search for identity and the ability to trust that God securely holds our whole life—past, present, and future.

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  • The Amish Midwife
    The Amish Midwife  

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Oregon nurse midwife Lexie Jaeger, who was adopted at birth, yearns to know her biological family. When her aunt Melia, a midwife in Lancaster County, PA, is charged with manslaughter in the death of an Amish woman and her baby, Lexie travels to help her. There, she meets her birth grandmother and begins to depend not on herself but on God. VERDICT This series debut by Clark (Secrets of Harmony Grove) and Gould (Beyond the Blue) is a well-written, intriguing story with fully developed characters and steady pacing. It should please both CF fans who enjoy emotional reads and nongenre readers who loved Jodi Picoult's Plain Truth.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780736937986
  • Publisher: Harvest House Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Series: Women of Lancaster County Series , #1
  • Pages: 324
  • Sales rank: 244,016
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Mindy Starns Clark is the bestselling author of more than 20 books, both fiction and nonfiction (more than 750,000 sold) including coauthoring the Christy Award-winningThe Amish Midwife. Mindy and her husband, John, have two adult children and live in Pennsylvania.www.mindystarnsclark.com

Leslie Gould, a former magazine editor, is the author of numerous novels, including Beyond the Blue and Garden of Dreams. She received her master of fine arts degree from Portland State University and lives in Oregon with her husband, Peter, and their four children.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(40)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2011

    The Search for Truth

    I'm always a bit skeptical when one of my favorite authors teams up with another author to produce a book. Will my favorite author's voice be heard? Will the resulting text be worth the time spent reading it? I am happy to say this time I was very pleased. Mindy Starns Clark has been one of my favorite authors but I had personally not read anything by Leslie Gould. In the future I will be looking for more of Ms. Gould's work.

    The story revolves around Lexie Jaeger who is a nurse-midwife in Oregon. From an early age she knows she is adopted, but has little information about her family of origin. With a death bed confession of her adopted father, Lexie's quest to find out her story begins.

    Lexie's journey to find the truth takes her to Lancaster, Pennsylvania where she agrees to help out a lay midwife who has found herself in a bit of legal trouble. The twists and turns in the story make it a very quick read.

    The story left me with new insights into the feelings of adopted children, even those who wind up in very wonderful adopted families. Before this book I had never really thought much about the types of loss and abandonment they would feel. I highly recommend this book to all lovers of Amish fiction. This isn't your run of the mill story; it is definitely set apart by the different subject matters that are brought out within the text.

    I received a copy of this book from Havest House Publishers and Mindy Starns Clark for my review.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2012

    Read it

    Good story line. Looking forward to reading the rest of the series. Helpful in gaining a better understanding of the Mennonite and Amish cultures.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2011

    Great Book

    I loved this book. I am looking forward to reading the next in this series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2011

    Great Character Development

    The Amish Midwife by Mindy Starns Clark and Leslie Gould kept me reading into the night. The authors skillfully demonstrated how the Amish (and other Anabaptist groups) struggle to maintain their identity despite encroaching modernism. In addition, they showed how tentacles of secrecy surrounding adoption can reach far into the future and impact children and grandchildren in a negative way. I particularly enjoyed Lexie's character development as she attempted to uncover, layer by layer, how she fit into their community. The strong ending left me wanting to read more in this series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    great story I loved it!

    Lexie Jaeger has known all her life that she was adopted, but now her father has passed, and on his deathbed, he gave her a box, that held clues to her past. Having the letters in the box read to her, by a member of her Mennonite congregation, Lexie knows that she has to find out more about her past, who is her birth mom?
    Lexie's trip into her past brings her to the heart of Amish country in Pennsylvania. A local lay midwife, is in legal trouble, she has been charged with manslaughter of a baby and the mother. As a nurse midwife, Lexie can help, but Marta sends word through a friend that she doesn't want Lexie's help. That does not stop Lexie however, she shows up on Marta's doorstep, determined to find answers.
    Finding out what she wants to know is not easy however, Marta is very close mouthed about the entire situation, and what Lexie does learn makes her wonder even more. Meeting a 'cousin' who is nearly her mirror image stirs Lexie to dig deeper. The fact that the Amish, like to let things be, complicates her search. Will Lexie learn who she is? Will she find what she needs to fill that empty spot inside her heart in Pennsylvania?
    I loved this book, it is the first I have read by these authors, and they just made the story come alive to me. Firstly, I have always been fascinated by midwives, and I enjoy Amish stories, so the combination of my favorite things, really made me want to read this book. The proverbial icing on the cake for this book, to me was the fact there was enough mystery and suspense to really draw you into the story. Truly this is a great book, that you will not want to miss. Fans of midwife stories, Amish fans, and mystery and suspense fans will all enjoy this book! Group discussion guide included. 321 pages, $13.99 US 5 stars.
    This book was provided for review purposes by Harvest House Publishers, no payment was received for this review.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2011

    Great book check it out.

    It is a very good book. wonderful story line. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    Could not put this book down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    An engaging voyage of discovery

    This is an engaging account of a young nurse-midwife, raised by her adoptive family in Oregon, who travels to Pennsylvania to discover the truth about her past. She ends up learning much more than she expected, both about her family and herself. Issues of identity, forgiveness, and belonging are deftly interwoven into the story of this woman's quest. The gradual unraveling of the mystery holds the reader's attention throughout. An added bonus is the respectful but candid depiction of the Mennonite and Amish cultures.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    strong family drama

    Just outside of Aurora, Oregon, three weeks after baby number 244 is born, her dying widower adopted father informs twenty-six years old midwife Lexie Jaeger with the rest of the truth that he and his late wife concealed from her. He tells her to never forget how he and her adopted mom loved her and finally admits his Montgomery County, Pennsylvania biological maternal grandma sent her a carved box. When her beloved dad dies, Lexie looks inside the box.

    After helping 245 enter the world, Lexie decides to travel to Pennsylvania to meet her birth family and learn why she was given away. She leaves behind James who she has been seeing for several years as she obsesses with a need to know her kin. In Pennsylvania, she meets the family and assists Aunt Melia the lay-midwife accused of manslaughter when her Amish patient and baby died during delivery. However, as Lexie begins to learn about her roots, she finds secrets that her biological family feels are An Inconvenient Truth. She considers leaving for home, although she knows God would expect her to forgive those who let her down as a baby.

    The first Amish Clark and Gould collaboration is a strong family drama that focuses on a person's bone-marrow deep need for a specific identification in which he or she believes they belong. With action provided especially by midwife responsibilities in light of the manslaughter charge and a supporting romantic subplot, The Amish Midwife is a terrific character driven tale as Lexie learns you can and cannot go home.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 26, 2014

    Read from March 24 to 26, 2014 I loved this story! Interesting


    Read from March 24 to 26, 2014

    I loved this story! Interesting history about the Amish and Mennonites,and about Midwifery. The scenic descriptions of the areas made me feel like I was there. The characters were so real, that I had several emotions going, one was sadness for the main character Though she was very successful in her job, her life still seemed unfilled,and incomplete, wouldn't you if you were in her place-if you were adopted? She had every right to feel that way, and get her story, get to the truth. What was the truth...that, you will have to read the story to find out, my friends! The story has lots of detail and twists and turns, which to me was fine, I did not think it was overdone. Actually, it kept me reading the book up till' the hours of the night, wanting to know what happens next,yes..the story is that captivating!
    This author did a superb job in describing all of the characters in the story, so real that you wanted to slug a few of them due to their stubborn assumptions of others, which makes me think how people can be that way, and in the end, hurt others in the process by misunderstandings, keeping grudges for years, missed opportunities for family connections,and just unhappiness in their lives and with those around them!
    This was an awesome, excellent story by a most excellent author. I have read other books by Mindy Starns Clark, and they never disappoint me!! I highly recommend this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    For anyone who enjoys Amish books

    Great read - great series

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  • Posted September 3, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Very good story! Sometimes the secrets that we keep can be very

    Very good story!

    Sometimes the secrets that we keep can be very destructive even when our heart and intentions are in the right place. Finding out these secrets might hurt, but they may also bring out the best and worst in us and we find forgiveness in ourselves and those around us.. The story brought tears of joy and those of sadness as Lexi searches for the answers to her adoption.

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  • Posted August 22, 2013

    Very good.

    This is a good book.you will not be disappointed. I would recommend this book to a friend

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2013

    Job well done! This story unwinds like a ball of yarn.

    The need to know where you come from can only be answered by people who were there and are willing to give up their secrets. Some secrets take on a life of their own.
    Answers to questions no one wants to remember. If only they knew it would be healing to get the secrets out in the open.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Absolutely thoroughly enjoyed every page in this book. Highly r

    Absolutely thoroughly enjoyed every page in this book. Highly recommend it.


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  • Posted July 3, 2013

    I recently read The Amish Midwife and thoroughly enjoyed the cha

    I recently read The Amish Midwife and thoroughly enjoyed the characters, plot twists, and romantic elements. The quest for a woman who was adopted out of Amish life as a baby was full of mystery, which added interest.

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  • Posted June 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I got up to Chapter 9 of The Amish Midwife¿about 100 pages of te

    I got up to Chapter 9 of The Amish Midwife—about 100 pages of teeth gritting and eyelid drooping—before I had to put it down. While there are some interesting aspects to midwifery I enjoyed discovering and some issues regarding Lexie's coming-to-terms with her discarded Mennonite faith, everything else about the actual story, the writing style, and the characters, was unsatisfactory.

    I knew I couldn't like the main character the moment she first referred herself (emphasis on first, meaning she does it more than once) as the "handsome counterpart" to her "handsome boyfriend." Do people really talk about themselves like that? Not to mention the way she treats her so-called boyfriend, leaving him without closure just so she can aimlessly tread murky waters on the other side of the country on a matter on which she is entirely clueless. She can't seem to think of anyone but herself, and doesn't have a compassionate bone in her body. This all annoyed me; it's one thing for me not to be able to relate to Lexie, but to actually not like her is an entirely different story.

    This book is classified as "romance," but let me tell you: if the romantic interest does not show his face by page 100, something is terribly wrong. I admit I haven't tried my hand at Amish romances before, but even for a religious storyline, I'd expect faster action or at least proper character introduction 1/4th of the way through. I didn't even get to the romance part of this story and I was still sick of it... big red flag.

    There isn't much else I can say about this one. Nothing worth mentioning that I enjoyed; nothing interesting enough to keep me reading. I actually had to fight from falling asleep in more than one sitting while reading, which means there's a large problem beyond my sleep deprivation that made it really difficult for me to read The Amish Midwife, and that problem would be The Amish Midwife itself.

    Pros: Realistic tone // Struggles with faith are well-captured

    Cons: Painfully slow pace // Lexie is incredibly dislikable // Character interactions are detached and flat

    Verdict: With an entirely self-absorbed and socially oblivious main character, a troubling so-called "romance" story structure, and a HUGE (read: not huge) family secret that lacks all of suspense, action, and intrigue, Clark and Gould's first installment in The Women of Lancaster County was a major letdown for me. Regulars to the genre may enjoy this one better because it does have its individual aspects, such as matters of Lexie's misplaced faith and her vocation, so if you've tried Amish romances before and have liked them, please don't let my review discourage you. As for me, The Amish Midwife has turned me away from all Amish fiction; I now know to stay away from this genre.

    Rating: 2 out of 10 hearts (1 star): Not completely a lost cause, but could not finish; I did not enjoy this book.

    Source: Complimentary copy provided by publisher in exchange for an honest and unbiased review (thank you!).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2013

    Great story!

    Enjoyed reading. Great story with most of the pieces remaining hidden until the end. Cant wait to read more in this series and by these authors.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Very enjoyable read.

    Great story, kept me guessing right til the end. Highly recomend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Very good.

    I liked the part where Lexie was helping to take care of the midwifr's daughter after she got drunk.

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