Amish Women: Lives and Stories

Amish Women: Lives and Stories

by Louise Stoltzfus
     
 

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From the Inside Flap

Written by a woman who grew up in an Old Order Amish community and church, Amish Women: Lives and Stories offers a gentle, lyrical inside view of Amish womanhood.

How are Amish women unique? How are they typical? How do they find expression in a place that values community togetherness above all else? This generous and

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Overview

From the Inside Flap

Written by a woman who grew up in an Old Order Amish community and church, Amish Women: Lives and Stories offers a gentle, lyrical inside view of Amish womanhood.

How are Amish women unique? How are they typical? How do they find expression in a place that values community togetherness above all else? This generous and heartwarming memoir explores these questions to discover what it means to be a woman and to be Amish.

Meet Naomi whose favorite author is C.S. Lewis. Rebecca who is single and has a career. Susie who is an artist. And Esther who has lost two children and spends much of her time reaching out to other members of her community who have suffered loss.

Louise Stoltzfus gathered her stories through a series of interviews and conversations with Amish women, many of whom she has known most of her life.

Stoltzfus is an editor for Good Books and has co-authored four cookbooks--The Central Market Cookbook, The Best of Mennonite Fellowship Meals, Favorite Recipes from Quilters, and Lancaster County Cookbook. She is also director of The People's Place Gallery, Intercourse, Pennsylvania, and lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, ten miles from her ancestral home.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In conversations with 10 Amish women, Stoltzfus explores her own Amish heritage. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
YA-A wonderful collection of short, readable personal narratives that introduces readers to a culture that continues to retain its uniqueness despite the ever-changing and fast-paced world that is forever impinging on it. Raised Amish, but departing from the community as an adult, Stoltzfus brings to life in-laws, friends, and children, all of whom offer their stories, sharing in deft prose their pain, pleasures, tragedies, and triumphs. An excellent book for readers wanting to gain more than a textbook knowledge of Amish women.-Michele L. Simms-Burton, Department of English, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Kathleen Hughes
This gently probing book examines the lives of Amish women living in a Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Amish settlement. Stoltzfus, who left the Amish community to pursue a career, gathered her stories through a series of interviews and conversations with other Amish women. In their own words, the women reveal their uniquenesses, hopes, and aspirations. Stoltzfus wistfully gazes in on their quiet world of reading, writing, cooking, quilting, and sewing. They tell of their rigorous daily chores, their devotion to their families and their faith, and the contentment this lifestyle gives them. They realize it is not a utopian world, and their stories also reflect pain, grief, and loss. Although this is only a very brief glimpse into the Amish world, it does provide an enjoyable snapshot of some extraordinary women.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561481293
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
09/01/1994
Pages:
122
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 8.86(h) x 0.58(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One -- I Was Once Amish

I was once Amish. Sometimes it seems I should say, "I am still Amish." For I have found it impossible to separate my life as an Amish person from my life as a late twentieth-century career woman. I am like the women who nurtured me. The values of my mother and my grandmothers still inform my decisions and my choices. They probably always will. I cannot escape who I am. I am schooled in the ways of the Amish.

I enjoy plain things.

The warmth of an Amish kitchen.

The smell of farms in early spring.

The fall harvest of gardens and fields.

The feelings of family and home.

Sometimes I long to sit in a quiet house lit by a gas lantern and spend an evening quilting or reading or talking with children. No television. No stereo. No telephone. None of the convenient distractions of the jet age.

Sometimes I even wonder what it would take for me to become Amish again. Could I give up these trappings of "the world?" Could I really go back to driving a horse and buggy? Could I think like an Amish woman? I doubt it, but still I wonder.

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