Amnesiac

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Billed as the more accessible bookend to the inscrutable but chart-topping Kid A, this compelling disc isn't exactly a paradigm of mainstream pop. Yes, guitars do rear their -- sometimes ugly, sometimes quite beautiful -- heads more often on Amnesiac, but the songs here are every bit as deep and provocative. Not that that's a bad thing, of course. Most of Amnesiac's songs are wrapped in claustrophobia-inducing effects like the pitch-shifter applied to Thom Yorke's already otherworldly voice on "Pulk/Pull Revolving Doors" or bracing, atonal blasts of noise like the machine-shop blare that permeates "Packt Like Sardines in a Crushd Tin Box". When they do surface, the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (3) from $9.01   
  • New (3) from $9.01   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$9.01
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(5863)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
BRAND NEW, Factory Sealed items direct from the Studios. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee. Quick International Airmail!

Ships from: Indian Trail, NC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$10.72
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(3)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW. Orders dispatched typically within 2 business days via a TRACKABLE PRIORITY SERVICE. Delivery usually takes 2-4 working days.

Ships from: Sunrise, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Close
Sort by

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Billed as the more accessible bookend to the inscrutable but chart-topping Kid A, this compelling disc isn't exactly a paradigm of mainstream pop. Yes, guitars do rear their -- sometimes ugly, sometimes quite beautiful -- heads more often on Amnesiac, but the songs here are every bit as deep and provocative. Not that that's a bad thing, of course. Most of Amnesiac's songs are wrapped in claustrophobia-inducing effects like the pitch-shifter applied to Thom Yorke's already otherworldly voice on "Pulk/Pull Revolving Doors" or bracing, atonal blasts of noise like the machine-shop blare that permeates "Packt Like Sardines in a Crushd Tin Box". When they do surface, the guitars that were all but absent on Kid A emerge in uncharacteristic ways: "I Might Be Wrong," for instance, finds Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien locked in a down-and-dirty blues battle that suggests the Yardbirds -- as gene-spliced with Underworld. Similarly, "Pyramid Song" takes a relatively spare, piano-driven melody and surrounds it with strings that wrap ever tighter, accentuating the desperate tone of Yorke's vocal. The singer asserts himself a bit more strongly on this disc, rather than burying his plaints beneath the sonic waves. His tone, harried and paranoid, remains essentially unchanged, his frets and fears articulated with an anguished delivery that sounds more credible than ever. Exhausting, but unforgettable, stuff.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Faced with a deliberately difficult deviation into "experimentation," Radiohead and their record label promoted Kid A as just that -- a brave experiment, and that the next album, which was just around the corner, really, would be the "real" record, the one to satiate fans looking for the next OK Computer, or at least guitars. At the time, people bought the myth, especially since live favorites like "Knives Out" and "You and Whose Army?" were nowhere to be seen on Kid A. That, however, ignores a salient point -- Amnesiac, as the album came to be known, consists of recordings made during the Kid A sessions, so it essentially sounds the same. Since Radiohead designed Kid A as a self-consciously epochal, genre-shattering record, the songs that didn't make the cut were a little simpler, so it shouldn't be a surprise that Amnesiac plays like a streamlined version of Kid A, complete with blatant electronica moves and production that sacrifices songs for atmosphere. This, inevitably, will disappoint the legions awaiting another guitar-based record that is, after all, what they were explicitly promised, but what were they expecting? This is an album recorded at the same time and Radiohead have a certain reputation to uphold. It would be easier to accept this if the record was better than it is. Where Kid A had shock on its side, along with an admirably dogged desire to not be conventional, Amnesiac often plays as a hodgepodge. True, it's a hodgepodge with amazing moments: the hypnotic sway of "Pyramid Song" and "You and Whose Army?," the swirling "I Might Be Wrong," "Knives Out," and the spectacular closer "Life in a Glasshouse," complete with a drunkenly swooning brass band. But, these are not moments that are markedly different than Kid A, which itself lost momentum as it sputtered to a close. And this is the main problem -- though it's nice for an artist to be generous and release two albums, these two records clearly derive from the same source and have the same flaws, which clearly would have been corrected if they had been consolidated into one record. Instead of revealing why the two records were separated, the appearance of Amnesiac makes the separation seem arbitrary -- there's no shift in tone, no shift in approach, and the division only makes the two records seem unfocused, even if the best of both records is quite stunning, proof positive that Radiohead are one of the best bands of their time. [Amnesiac had trace elements of being a roundup of holdovers from Kid A that didn't quite fit that album's architecture, and its origins are echoed on EMI's expanded 2009 reissue of Amnesiac. Here, there are unheard songs and live cuts scattered among the B-sides, but nothing that could quite qualify as a major find -- which makes sense, because the album itself grew from the outtakes of Kid A, so all the best material is on the album. Which isn't to say that the 15 tracks on the bonus disc are not worthwhile: some of the B-sides lean a little heavily on atmosphere, but they're often intriguing, and this contains another six songs from the band's excellent April 2001 set at Canal+ Studio, plus a version of "Like Spinning Plates," from the I Might Be Wrong: Live Recordings EP. Again, the live versions tend to add warmth and muscle to studio constructions, so they're very worthwhile listening.]
Blender - Douglas Wolk
Nobody has ever made a record that sounds like this before. Eventually, they will. But Radiohead will have done it first.

Nobody has ever made a record that sounds like this before. Eventually, they will. But Radiohead will have done it first.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/25/2009
  • Label: Capitol
  • EAN: 5099969710322
  • Catalog Number: 97103

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Radiohead Primary Artist
Humphrey Lyttelton Trumpet, Leader, Bandleader
Paul Bridge Double Bass
Jimmy Hastings Clarinet
John Lubbock Conductor
Pete Strange Trombone
Adrian Macintosh Drums
Orchestra of Saint Johns Performing Ensemble
Orchestra 440 Performing Ensemble
Thom Yorke Guitar, Vocals
Technical Credits
Radiohead Producer
Jim Warren Engineer
Nigel Godrich Producer, Engineer
Jonny Greenwood Arranger, Orchestral Arrangements
Graeme Stewart Engineer
Stanley Donwood Drawing, Book
Dan Grech-Marguerat Engineer
Bob Ludwig Mastering
Tchocky Book
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    "Kid A" Leftovers? "Amnesiac" Is More Than That

    What major rock band aside from Radiohead would open up their new album with a song titled "Packed Like Sardines In A Crushed Tin Box"? Who else other than Radiohead would end their album with a New Orleans-style jazz number called "Life In A Glass House"? The answer to both of those questions is no one. Maybe Oasis and U-2 are great at making catchy, anthemic tunes. Maybe Green Day and My Chemical Romance are good when it comes to edgy punk music. And we already know that Bruce Springsteen at the age of sixty still surprises us with the occasional down-to-earth, rootsy rock albums he produces. But what other major rock band do you know of that creates sounds like Radiohead? Sounds that are eerie, mournful, indecipherable and yet they stay in your memory, even if the songs don't follow the traditional verse-chorus-verse progression.

    When Radiohead was recording their landmark 2000 album, "Kid A", they had enough material left over for a second equally brilliant record. "Amnesiac" was that record. Like "Kid A", the record is full of synth breaks, minimalist beats and ambient sounds---and when one considers how the group was almost pigeonholed into being the next Nirvana, their current style is actually refreshing to listen to. Leader Thom Yorke still sings like a man gasping desperately for air, especially on "Pyramid Song" and "You And Whose Army?". What is amazing about "Amnesiac" is how well the rest of the band responds to Yorke's muse and vision. Guitarist Jonny Greenwood is particularly fluid, playing an array of different instruments; if you thought Greenwood's musical score for the film "There Will Be Blood" was a fluke, just listen to this and you'll see how proficient he is.

    The second disc of "Amnesiac" features some extra tracks that didn't make the final cut, most of which are very good, including an expanded version of "Life In The Glass House". There are also some live performances from 2002 which, like during the "Kid A" period, showed how well Radiohead can reduplicate that difficult style of the album into a concert setting. Some critics would say that for Radiohead to go from their 1994 single "Creep" to this album is almost like The Beatles going from "Love Me Do" to "Tomorrow Never Knows". For me, however, I don't know how to describe it. It's one of those disjointed yet compelling albums you know that it shouldn't work and shouldn't stick in your memory. But it does. It does so magnificently.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews