Among the Brave (Shadow Children Series #5)

Among the Brave (Shadow Children Series #5)

4.7 145
by Margaret Peterson Haddix
     
 

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In the aftermath of a crisis that threatens the safety of all shadow children -- illegal third-borns in a society that allows only two children per family -- Trey's friends expect him to take charge -- a function he doesn't want or think he can do.

Trey's new role leads him to travel with Luke Garner's brother, Mark, to Population Police headquarters.…  See more details below

Overview

In the aftermath of a crisis that threatens the safety of all shadow children -- illegal third-borns in a society that allows only two children per family -- Trey's friends expect him to take charge -- a function he doesn't want or think he can do.

Trey's new role leads him to travel with Luke Garner's brother, Mark, to Population Police headquarters. There he impersonates an officer to try to rescue Luke, who has been taken prisoner. The nonstop adventure puts all three boys in danger and risks exposing the underground movement to help all shadow children.

In this, the fifth book in the Shadow Children series, Margaret Peterson Haddix returns to the futuristic setting and compelling characters she created in Among the Hidden. With an adrenaline-fueled plot and surprising twists, Haddix has again crafted a story that is suspenseful until the last page.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Fifth in the Shadow Children series, which began with Among the Hidden, Among the Brave by Margaret Peterson Haddix centers on third child Trey, who must rescue Mark and Luke Garner from the Population Police. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
In a futuristic society that prohibits more than two children per family, 13-year-old Trey is forced to be a hero. As a third-born child, he has been in hiding all his life. Simply being outdoors is frightening. Now he must not only venture outside, but also find his friends and, somehow, try to rescue them. He reluctantly joins forces with his friend Luke's brash brother, and must push himself even more when making alliances with people who may—or may not—be resistance members. In this fifth book of the "Shadow Children" series, which has previously centered on the character, Luke, readers are treated to viewing this peculiar society from Trey's perspective. The tension is gripping and chapters end on cliff-hangers that will encourage even reluctant readers to keep reading. Readers will feel Trey's intense fear but cheer him on as he takes small steps that lead him to bravery. Haddix's characters are well developed and her plot well drawn. Though dark fantasy, and perhaps too frightening for children at the younger end of the recommended age group, there is a message of hope at the end. And the promise of another installment in the series. 2004, Simon & Schuster, Ages 9 to 12.
—Kathryn Erskine
School Library Journal
Irene Gut, a student nurse, was living in Poland when the Nazis invaded. Later she became a Russian prisoner; still later she was a German prisoner. Even as she endured personal violence, she witnessed the Jewish population suffering their own horrors. For no reason that she could explain, she was compelled to help the Jews. She began by providing food surreptitiously. Soon she provided some Jews with a safe work environment. Eventually she hid 12 people in the basement of a German major's villa. As she moved around, she had one thought, to find her family; but it was not until many years after the war that she would accomplish this goal. As the war ended, it was all the souls she had helped who helped her. They fed her, hid her and helped her to move on with her life. This memoir offered another perspective on WW II. Irene performed heroic tasks without any thought of her own safety or well-being. She did it because she knew she had to or people would die. Her good deeds were repaid as those she had helped came back to help her later. Some pictures and two pronunciation guides as well as a historical note are included. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1999, Random House, Anchor, 248p. map. 21cm. 98-54095., $12.00. Ages 16 to adult. Reviewer: Robin S. Holab-Abelman; White Plains, NY , July 2001 (Vol. 35, No. 4)
Booklist
"Haddix writes a compelling story, full of intrigue, danger, and adventure. The level of tension barely lets up, ensuring that 'can't-put-it-down' headlong impulse to keep reading...This will be a popular choice for those who enjoy novels of danger and suspense."
From the Publisher
"A compelling story, full of intrigue, danger, and adventure."
Booklist

"The level of tension barely lets up, ensuring that 'can't-put-it-down' headlong impulse to keep reading."
Booklist

"A fast and wild ride."
School Library Journal

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439106709
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
05/11/2010
Series:
Shadow Children Series , #5
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
89,921
Lexile:
750L (what's this?)
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

An Excerpt from In My Hands
Part Two: Finding Wings


I was awakened by gunfire and explosions. I sat bolt upright in bed, looking around in confusion. When I moved to the window and nudged aside the blackout curtain, I was greeted by the dull clap of detonation. Rokita's men were doing their work, the final Aktion in Ternopol. I could not keep the tears from coming. They spilled onto the front of my dress as I tied my apron around my waist.
——
Schulz was already in the kitchen when I arrived, wide-eyed and shaking. He handed me a cup of coffee and put one arm across my shoulders. "Irene, the pogrom will be over soon. You must compose yourself."
——
Through the window, we could see smoke billowing up beyond the roof of the factory, from the direction of the ghetto. Behind us, the door opened and the major came in, pale and sick-looking.
——
"Schulz, something for a hangover," he said, groping for a chair. He sat down, and with each explosion and burst of gunfire, his shoulders jerked. He was muttering to himself. "Stupid, stupid war."
——
In the dining room, the officers and secretaries were making their late appearance. Hardly anyone spoke, and when they did, it was with a sour, wincing irritableness. The entire German staff of HKP was hungover and in foul spirits. Beyond these walls, people were dying, but the officers and secretaries cared only that the noise hurt their heads, and that work would be hard enough today with disruptions from the SS. It was all I could do to serve those people breakfast, all the time knowing that my friends must be hearing the same terrible sounds I heard, andwondering about friends and relatives who had not escaped.
——
Finally, all the late arrivals had dragged themselves off to work. I was desperate to get to the major's suite and check on my friends. The moment the door shut behind the last straggler, I raced upstairs. The bathroom door was wide open, and I hurried inside, shutting it behind me. Just as I was about to open my mouth to speak, the door opened again.
——
I whirled around. A young SS trooper stood with his hand on the doorknob. He was turning pink with embarrassment at bursting in on me in the bathroom.
——
"Forgive me, Fraulein. I beg your pardon," he stammered.
——
My entire body had gone icy cold. "What are you doing here?"
——
"I — we have orders — " He pulled himself together before I did. "What are you doing here?"
——
"I'm Major R¸gemer's housekeeper, and I'm about to clean his suite. You are in the major's bedroom. Will you please excuse me?"
——
"Of course, Fraulein."
——
Looking quite sheepish, he turned and let himself out. Obviously, he did not expect to find any Jews hiding in the major's bathroom. If he had taken even a moment to look around, he would have spotted the vent. And he would have seen the shadowy form of Ida Haller, sitting cross-legged behind the screen.
——
I closed and locked the door, and drew a shaky breath.
——
"Irene!" Ida whispered. "You must turn us in. This is too dangerous for you."
——
"No! Just wait. I'll let you have a break when I know the SS are gone. Don't do anything until I get back!"
——
I fumbled open the lock and slipped out the door, refusing to argue with them for their lives. I hurried back to my duties, while the SS continued to search HKP. I was as conscious of their presence as a quail who knows a fox is nearby. My skin prickled with their movements around the hotel. By late morning, they had finished at the plant and gone away in their trucks, but detonations and gunfire from surrounding areas of Ternopol continued to break on the summer air all day.
——
As soon as the SS had left the factory complex, I had snuck upstairs to give my friends a chance to stretch their legs and use the toilet. Then I ordered them into the vent again, ignoring their pleas to stop endangering my own life for theirs. I told them it was impossible, what they were suggesting, and that I would not hear of it. I shoved the screen back in place and left them still arguing with me in urgent whispers.
——
After lunch, I went to the villa on foot. The tenants were just leaving as I arrived; they cursed me and called me a whore of the Germans. I stood silently aside to let them pass me; the lives of my friends were more important than my own wounded feelings. I prayed silently for them to hurry up, to leave, to turn the corner of the street and be gone, never to come back.
——
And then the house was mine. Perhaps the major thought it was to be his house, but I knew better. The house was mine, my treasure box, my sword, my henhouse. I turned around and around in the front hall, owning the moldings around the door frames, owning the chandelier over the staircase, owning the door to the basement.
——
I opened that door and went downstairs, taking the time to examine the space more thoroughly. As servants' quarters, the basement rooms were outfitted with everything necessary — two bedrooms, a kitchenette, a bathroom, closets. All the windows up by the ceiling, windows and ground level, were covered with dark cardboard for the Verdunklung, the blackouts. No one could see into the basement from the outside. No light would show. I felt a surge of elation as I went into the furnace room and opened the coal chute. For a moment, as I stood clapping coal dust from my hands, I had a picture of my friends sliding down the chute like children in a playground. I even pictured myself, like a proud mother, catching them in my arms and setting them safely on the ground, while a blue sky embraced us from above.
——
Then the sunny picture faded, and I was left with one more question: How was I going to get them out of the major's bathroom and out of HKP?


——
I would need a key. The street entrance of the hotel was not guarded, and was well out of sight of the guardhouse at the main gate. But the door was always locked at night, for fear of sabotage or murder by the locals, I suppose, or of unauthorized late-night rendezvous. All through dinner preparations I tried to think of ways to get the major's keys, trying out first one then another story to explain why I needed them. In the end, I decided simply to steal the keys.
——
Every one of staff was still suffering from the effects of their party the night before. The dining room was quiet during dinner. Voices were subdued, and barely a laugh rose above the sullen murmur. People tried to handle their forks and knives carefully to avoid clattering, and many officers and secretaries excused themselves early. There was little billiard playing or after-dinner drinking.
——
I went to the major's table, where he sat alone, nursing a glass of wine and looking down at his uneaten dinner.
——
"Can I get you anything, Herr Major?" I asked.
——
He looked up at me, his glasses catching the light in such a way as to obscure his eyes; he regarded me with a round, blank stare.
——
"I think perhaps I will take a glass of warm milk with me to bed, Irene. And I'll take something to help me sleep. This has been a terrible day."
——
I tried to keep the excitement out of my voice as I began clearing his dishes. "Oh, I'm sorry to hear that, Herr Major. I'll be happy to bring some milk to your room right away."
——
He pushed himself away from the table. "Good. And tomorrow I will send some men to paint inside the house. If you could just watch over them, see that they do the job properly . . ."
——
"Of course."
——
I practically hauled him to his feet and shoved him out of the dining room, so anxious was I to see him in bed and unconscious. At the bottom of the staircase I left him and ran to the kitchen to heat the milk, and in five minutes I was knocking on his door.
——
Major R¸gemer took the glass from the little tray and put a small white pill on his tongue. While he gulped down the milk I glanced at his dressing table. His keys were there.
——
——
"Sleep well, Herr Major," I said as he turned away.
——
"Hmm? What's that?"
——
I smiled and raised my voice. "Good night, Herr Major!"
——
        I left the door slightly ajar and hurried back downstairs. Now, for the second night in a row, I had to keep my vigil, waiting for the hotel to fall asleep. I sat on the edge of my bed, not daring to lie down while I waited, for in spite of my state of nervous anxiety, I was as weary as if I'd been juggling bricks all day. So I sat, staring out my open door into the hallway, listening to the sounds that came further and further apart. At last, the place was still. I kicked my shoes off and tiptoed up to the third floor.
——
        At the door to the major's bedroom I stopped to listen; from within came a labored snoring. I remembered the sensation of waiting in the wings offstage in high school, then taking a deep breath and walking out into the lights. There was the same fluttering in my stomach, the same twitch of muscles between my shoulder blades as I straightened my back. And so, I took a deep breath and went in.
——
The light from the hallway slanted in across the room and illuminated the dressing table. I gave a quick glance to the bed, which was in shadow. The major snored on. I closed my hand over the bulky set of keys to keep them from jingling, and then backed out, locking the door behind me. I don't know what I was thinking, for if the major had woken and tried to leave his room, he would have raised a commotion. But I could not have him walk into the bathroom until I'd gotten my friends.
——
They were stiff, cramped, and tired. One at a time they lowered themselves from the air duct and stood rubbing their aching muscles. Fanka swung her arms in circles to get the blood moving, and Steiner's back let out a crack as he stretched himself.
——
"Let's hurry," I said, opening the door to peek out. I waved them after me, and we went single file and down the staircase as fast as their stiff legs would allow. They stood behind me, watching anxiously, while I found the right key from the ring in my hands; then I had the street door open, and they were stepping out into the fresh night air.
——
"You know the address," I whispered. "Go through the coal chute on the left side of the house and wait for me in the basement. I'll be over first thing in the morning. Go! Stay in the shadows, and God bless you."
——
In a moment, they had disappeared into the darkness. I locked the door again, returned the keys to the major's room, and then threw myself onto my own bed, telling myself that they would make it. I did not allow myself to imagine otherwise.
——
Before I fell asleep, I felt a surge of triumph: Rokita thought Ternopol was judenrein tonight, that his Aktions had rid the city of Jews once and for all. But I had taken action myself. There were at least six Jews left in town. As long as I could help it, Ternopol would never be judenrein.
——
The instant I was able to get away after breakfast, I walked to the villa as quickly as I could — quickly enough to put a stitch in my side and to break a sweat in the heat. I unlocked the door and burst inside, dreading the sound of planters bumping ladders against the furniture. But it was silent. I was in
time — assuming that my friends were indeed waiting in the basement. The smell of cabbage and potatoes lingered in the air.
——
Almost fearing what I might find, I opened the basement door and clattered down the stairs, my shoes making a racket on the wooded steps. "Hoo-ee! It's Irene!" I called out.
——
The first room was empty. Trying not to worry, I opened the door to the furnace room, praying to find my six friends — and Henry Weinbaum. The door creaked as it swung open into the gloom, and I called out again.
——
"It's Irene!"
——
There was an almost audible sigh of relief. One by one, figures merged from the shadows: Ida, Lazar, Clara, Thomas, Fanka, Moses Steiner, and a young, handsome fellow I took to be Henry Weinbaum. I shook hands with them all silently, suddenly overcome with emotion. They were all there; they were safe and alive. And, to my surprise, I found three strangers, who greeted me with an odd mixture of sheepishness and defiance.
——
"I'm Joseph Weiss," the eldest of the three said. "And this is Marian Wilner and Alex Rosen. Henry told us."
——
For a moment I was at a loss. I had ten lives in my hands now! But there wasn't time for lengthy introductions. The soldiers from the plant were due any minute to start painting.
——
"Hurry, everyone," I said. "You'll have to stay in the attic until the house is painted. I'll check on you as often as I can. I don't need to tell you not to make any noise at all."
——
This was met with grim nods all around. Then we made our way upstairs. The attic was musty; dust swirled in a shaft of light from the high window, and the air smelled of mouse droppings. "Shoes off," I said. "Don't walk around unless you absolutely must."
——
I locked them in just as trucks ground to a halt out on the street.

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Meet the Author

Margaret Peterson Haddix is the author of many critically and popularly acclaimed YA and middle grade novels, including The Missing series and the Shadow Children series. A graduate of Miami University (of Ohio), she worked for several years as a reporter for The Indianapolis News. She also taught at the Danville (Illinois) Area Community College. She lives with her family in Columbus, Ohio. Visit her at HaddixBooks.com.

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Among the Brave (Shadow Children Series #5) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 145 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the most interesting in the series. It talks about children that have been in hiding for all their lives but for the first time they step out into the unknown and have friends. Trey who has been afraid of the outside world for so long has to go on a mission to save his friends from being executed. He goes through grouling situations in heating ducts, dark streets enemy bases, and on the road for so long. Find out more by watching this heart breaking yet tearful and touching series today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I remeber reading this series for the first time in elementary school and it was one of my favorites. The element of suspense is great and i really liked how the author wrote from treys point of view. You can see him change and assume responsibilty while trying to deal with his fear. I feel like i am truly part of the story. One of the best dystopian series of all time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just started reading it 2 hours ago and have not put it down. Very intriginng and AWESOME.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An awesome book filled with suspense and undescribable action. One things's for sure, you've gotta be a fast-paced reader to read this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A++++-+
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was definitely my favorite book out of all of them READ IT!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love all the books in this series and i cannot wait to start this book
AA1314 More than 1 year ago
this book was great!!! Yiu find a lot more about Trey 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
head of the Population Police has taken over the government, and executions are common. Trey went to Mr. Talbot's home seeking help to rescue Luke and his other third born friends just as he is taken away in handcuffs. Desperate, he teams up with Luke's older, more reckless brother, Mark, to try to find the others. Mark is caught and Trey enlists in the Population Police, his only hope of freeing him. To escape, the boys make a deal with a resistance member disguised as a guard to rescue a prisoner from another torture camp. The prisoner turns out to be none other than Mr. Talbot, who headed the resistance movement. Mark and Trey are able to rescue their friends, but are unable to help the guard who helped them. The adults are ready to give up but the third born children vow to keep up the fight. Some positives of this book are, that it has tons of suspense, it will also make you want to read more and more to see what happens. That means you won't have trouble reading it and it wont bore you. This book is about how third children are illegal in the U.S and the third children that are in exile are trying to change that. The main characters in this novel are Trey, Nina, Lee, Jen, Mark, Luke, Matt, John, Mr. Talbot, Mrs. Talbot, and Joe. This book takes place in the united states in a time that has never happened before and hopefully will not happen in the future where third children are not allowed. This is an example of a little of the dialogue: Mrs. Talbot: "you're just a little boy, aren't you?" Mrs. Talbot: "all the thirds-so naïve. So sheltered. Don't you know? The only way they're going to release George is in a coffin." Trey: "no they aren't." Trey: "you can rescue him. I'll-I'll help." This book also has some negatives. One is that it can be confusing on where and what's happening. Another reason is that it has some hard vocabulary that can get you mixed up. The last reason is that there are a lot of scenes and settings in this novel, so you can get confused. The writing style of Margaret Peterson Haddix was with good length sentences that varied. The author also used third person narration for the novel. I would recommend this novel to anyone who likes suspense, mystery, or action novels. This is because this novel has a lot of all of that. The novel would be enjoyable to pretty much all readers but I am just recommending it to some. If you have read this book/think you'll like it, then I would also recommend all the other books in this series, such as Among the Hidden, Among the Imposters, Among the Free, etc. this is my review of the novel, Among the Brave.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have to admit, I love the Shadow Children books, so when I got to this one, I was a tad dissappointed. I stopped reading the series about halfway through this book. For me, it was a little slow and hard to understand at times. The rest of the series was written very straight-forward. However, I feel that this book was unique. It has some ups and downs to it. I encourage readers to finish this series and not stop like I did after this book. If you don't understand it, try to ask a friend or someone who has read the book for help like I did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book, Among the Brave, is by far the best book in the shadow children series that I have read so far. I found myself many times predicting what I thought would happen and then finding it being completely wrong. For instance when they were driving away from the population police headquarters and mark was still in the cage, they were talking about whether or not they believed the guard and I had thought that after that they would not have gone and picked up the guard's friend or at least attempted to. I also liked the fact that the author made Trey always think of himself as being cowardice, when he was actually extremely brave. The only part of the book that I would have changed is the part where the mob attacked their truck. It seemed a little corny that these people who are starving could flip a car over twice. Although that part was kind of corny, I liked how the author used it as a way to free Mark and yet keep him from his full athletic ability. -Brandon M
Guest More than 1 year ago
Among the Brave is a great book to read. It has mystery, deception, and action. It starts out with Trey, one of the kids from the previous books, with papers he must deliver to Mr. Talbolt but the thing is Trey has Agro-phobia and hates even looking outside let alone being there and when a secret organization called the population police come and take Mr. Talbolt away its up trey to get him back . With the help of Matthew Garner, Luke Garner¿s oldest brother, will they succeed or fail? I liked this book very much it shows that even if you think you can¿t do something if you never give up you can accomplish anything. It had a really solid storyline and really isn¿t confusing at all. It is pretty slow at the beginning but aren¿t all books? I couldn¿t really relate to anyone in the book. But I know how it feels to think you¿ve tried everything but at the last minute you find something that renews your hope. This is book five in a series of seven called the shadow children series. I really suggest you read the first four books before you read this one though because it could get confusing. I think that this book would entertain any age group from seventh grade on up
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this whole series with my third grade class. I was only missing this book. My students loved the whole series and begged me to keep reading even when it was time for recess. Full of suspense and excitement! I highly recommend this!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Noahchms14 Among the Brave is a mediocre book. It is slow throughout the book you have to wait for action to pick up, and the author drags out most of the book way too far when it can be shortened and be a whole lot better. The locations in this book threw me off because in one chapter they were driving to find out where their friends are being held captive, and in the next we don’t know if they are in trouble or they are safe with all of their friends. The details hurt the book because the author is way too descriptive. For example when a character walks outside the author thought she had to put in every little detail which makes some parts of the book immensely annoying and boring to read I often found myself skipping ahead because there is some much detail. At best Among the Brave is mediocre.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This series is so freakin amazing!!! Thank you so much margaret peterson haddix! It tells you the lives of people in the past. And i also agree with the person above that he is hot! Apparently they changed the cover since i read this series which was actually a few years ago! Ever since my totes cool teacher gave it to us to read! I love you now so so much! Anyways back to the cover! It looks really cool now i gotta admit but the covers on all the books were always awesome! Again thank you margaret peterson haddix for being such an amazing author and for making this series happen! Xoxo to all!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first bookbis grea ti
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE the shadow children seiries( i know that is probibly not spelled right but it is time for bed) ( by the way did you know i was awesome!)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Omg the trey on the front is hot lol its true dont hide it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey @ anonimous january 20th. U are not a good reader if u got bored! THIS BOOK IS AMAZING NOT STUPID LIKE U THINK!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago