Among Women

Among Women

5.0 4
by J. M. Cornwell
     
 
A modern Scheherazade in New Orleans in 1984.

Alone.

Abandoned in New Orleans with no friends or family, surviving only on her wits, Pearl Caldwell has finally put herself back on the road back to the life she wants.

Then she's arrested on a false charge and thrown into jail. Among women of all sorts, Pearl finds a strength she never knew she had and a voice to

Overview

A modern Scheherazade in New Orleans in 1984.

Alone.

Abandoned in New Orleans with no friends or family, surviving only on her wits, Pearl Caldwell has finally put herself back on the road back to the life she wants.

Then she's arrested on a false charge and thrown into jail. Among women of all sorts, Pearl finds a strength she never knew she had and a voice to tell her own story -- and the stories of the other women in the Orleans Parish jail.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781461031345
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
04/28/2011
Pages:
234
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.53(d)

Meet the Author

In the Colorado Rockies in the shadow of Pikes Peak, J. M. Cornwell writes about relationships, people and secrets. Her stories have been included in twelve anthologies, most notably Chicken Soup for the Soul and A Cup of Comfort, and her debut novel, Past Imperfect, was published in July 2009. Among Women is her latest novel, based on experiences in 1984 in New Orleans.

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Among Women 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
TCLathrop More than 1 year ago
J. M. Cornwell is an engaging writer who brings to life characters that pull you into the story. A great novel, indeed.
S0rceress0 More than 1 year ago
What this story outlines, are the stories of women who are put through the legal system. The stories are not just about the events landing them in jail, but about them as people. As law abiding citizens, we do not always stop to think of the criminal element as part of humanity. They may appear to us as lesser animals, creatures to be locked up and fed through the bars, hosed down at random intervals and bossed around. Who among us would sit down to talk to them and know them as our neighbors, our friends, our mothers, sisters, or children? The character Pearl Caldwell does this. She creeps past her instinctual wariness and uses her rusty writing skill to journal the stories of the women that she lives among while incarcerated. We find that we might, in those situations, make some of the same choices, or do some of the same actions. These female characters bring up real feelings and real choices for us. They show us people can be soft and hard at the same time. They are described so realistically that you find you are sitting there in the prison quad with these women. The stories are spaced with fine handed skill so that we are brought to burning curiosity and impatience before that curiosity is satisfied. There is little action given the limited lifestyle, yet there is threat, and loss. How far would you walk to get your children back? Would you commit the ultimate crime to defend yourself, even if you were punished harshly for it? What kind of job would you do to prevent starvation? What if you had never committed a crime at all? Manipulation stands out as a major theme in this book. It leaves the reader with an increasing desire to cry "UNFAIR!" and knowing that in the same situation our voices would be just as unheard. Pearl gives these women a chance to be human again and get their stories out into the world outside the prison quad. It is clear this is an author with previous skill in writing personal stories and really being effective emotionally.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a retired correctional officer (and a woman), I wasn't sure what I was going to find on reading Cornwell's Among Women. I was afraid I might find sensationalized situations and stereotypical characters. What I did find was a book I didn't want to put down. The characters are well-developed. The reader sees the various characters as the heroine sees them; and gets to "watch" as her perception of the women around her changes. As our main character's stereotypes change, so does her perception of herself change also. The situations are not trite, but complex - as is life. No easy solutions are offered, but rather life unfolds very much as it truly does. Wrong choices are portrayed as wrong choices, separate from the people who make them. Each person defies being placed in a neat little cubby, but emerges as a flesh-and-blood woman, with wisdom in some areas and something looking a bit like idiocy in others... again, like life. I received a complimentary copy of this book for the purpose of reviewing it, but if I had paid full price for it I would still consider it worthwhile. A good read for any woman who is interested in entertainment which is also thought-provoking.