Amphigorey Also

Amphigorey Also

4.4 7
by Edward Gorey
     
 

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Drawings (including thirty-two pages in color), captions, and verse showcasing Gorey’s unique talents and humor. "The Glorious Nosebleed," "The Utter Zoo," "The Epiplectic Bicycle," and fourteen other selections.

Overview

Drawings (including thirty-two pages in color), captions, and verse showcasing Gorey’s unique talents and humor. "The Glorious Nosebleed," "The Utter Zoo," "The Epiplectic Bicycle," and fourteen other selections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780151064434
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/25/1993
Pages:
275
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.33(h) x 1.03(d)

Meet the Author


Edward Gorey (1925-2000) wrote and illustrated such popular books as The Doubtful Guest, The Gashlycrumb Tinies, and The Headless Bust. He was also a very successful set and costume designer, earning a Tony Award for his Broadway production of Edward Gorey's Dracula. Animated sequences of his work have introduced the PBS series Mystery! since 1980.

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Amphigorey Also 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sadie_leona More than 1 year ago
Gorey is one of the most strangest illustrators I know of. And the greatest. If you are a fan of his work, make sure to pick this one up!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best thing ever, in the world. i love his work!
Guest More than 1 year ago

One of the epiphanies of my life occurred in 1959, when, at the age of 12, I discovered a boxed set of Edward Gorey's books.

One of them was The Wuggly Ump, about a horrible monster that travels a great distance just to devour several 'innocent' children. (We know they're innocent because they eat 'wholesome bowls of bread & milk' and play harmless games.)

It was wonderful.

Not only was it nasty, it was a slap at middle-class bourgeois sensibilities. What was there not to love?