An Aesthetic Occupation: The Immediacy of Architecture and the Palestine Conflict by Daniel Bertand Monk | 9780822383307 | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
An Aesthetic Occupation: The Immediacy of Architecture and the Palestine Conflict

An Aesthetic Occupation: The Immediacy of Architecture and the Palestine Conflict

by Daniel Bertand Monk
     
 

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In An Aesthetic Occupation Daniel Bertrand Monk unearths the history of the unquestioned political immediacy of "sacred" architecture in the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis. Monk combines groundbreaking archival research with theoretical insights to examine in particular the Mandate era-the period in the first half of the twentieth century when Britain

Overview


In An Aesthetic Occupation Daniel Bertrand Monk unearths the history of the unquestioned political immediacy of "sacred" architecture in the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis. Monk combines groundbreaking archival research with theoretical insights to examine in particular the Mandate era-the period in the first half of the twentieth century when Britain held sovereignty over Palestine. While examining the relation between monuments and mass violence in this context, he documents Palestinian, Zionist, and British attempts to advance competing arguments concerning architecture's utility to politics.
Succumbing neither to the view that monuments are autonomous figures onto which political meaning has been projected, nor to the obverse claim that in Jerusalem shrines are immediate manifestations of the political, Monk traces the reciprocal history of both these positions as well as describes how opponents in the conflict debated and theorized their own participation in its self-representation. Analyzing controversies over the authenticity of holy sites, the restorations of the Dome of the Rock, and the discourse of accusation following the Buraq, or Wailing Wall, riots of 1929, Monk discloses for the first time that, as combatants looked to architecture and invoked the transparency of their own historical situation, they simultaneously advanced-and normalized-the conflict's inability to account for itself.
This balanced and unique study will appeal to anyone interested in Israel or Zionism, the Palestinians, the Middle East conflict, Jerusalem, or its monuments. Scholars of architecture, political theory, and religion, as well as cultural and critical studies will also be informed by its arguments.

Editorial Reviews

Middle East Journal
Bertrand Monk takes an unorthodox look into the history of the 'sacred' architecture in the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis.
Shofar
The author unearths the history of the political immediacy of 'sacred' architecture in the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis, examining in particular the Mandate era. While examining the relation between monuments and mass violence in this context, he documents Palestinian, Zionist, and British attempts to advance competing arguments concerning architecture's utility to politics.
Gabriel Piterberg
[An] ambitious excavation of 'the career of architecture' in the prehistory of the Palestine conflict. . . .—New Left Review
Columbia College Today
In Israel and the Occupied Territories, even the stones are invested with meaning, and 'sacred' architecture can take on a devastating political significance for both sides in the conflict.
Publishers Weekly
A scholarly look at the role of architecture in the Israeli-Palestinian crisis, An Aesthetic Occupation: The Immediacy of Architecture and the Palestinian Conflict shows why controversies over monuments (like Ariel Sharon's infamous visit to Haram al-Sarif, which touched off the current intifada) can explode into violence. Focusing particularly on the British Mandate period and using examples like the Wailing Wall riots of 1929 and the restoration of the Dome of the Rock, Daniel Bertrand Monk, a SUNY-Stony Brook art and architecture professor, explores how holy sites were transformed into political symbols. Academic in tone, this unusual study offers a new perspective on a still roiling dispute. ( Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A scholarly look at the role of architecture in the Israeli-Palestinian crisis, An Aesthetic Occupation: The Immediacy of Architecture and the Palestinian Conflict shows why controversies over monuments (like Ariel Sharon's infamous visit to Haram al-Sarif, which touched off the current intifada) can explode into violence. Focusing particularly on the British Mandate period and using examples like the Wailing Wall riots of 1929 and the restoration of the Dome of the Rock, Daniel Bertrand Monk, a SUNY-Stony Brook art and architecture professor, explores how holy sites were transformed into political symbols. Academic in tone, this unusual study offers a new perspective on a still roiling dispute. ( Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780822383307
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Publication date:
02/25/2002
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Daniel Bertrand Monk is George T. and Myra W. Cooley Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies and Director, Peace and Conflict Studies Program [P-CON] at Colgate University.

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