An Anthropology of Everyday Life: An Autobiography

Overview

In 1959, a groundbreaking study of nonverbal communication, The Silent Language, was published to international acclaim. Written by Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist, it was one of the first books to examine the complex ways people communicate with one another without speaking. More than thirty years later, The Silent Language has never been out of print, has been translated into several languages, has sold more than 1.5 million copies in the U.S., and remains the definitive book in its field. Today, Ned ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $52.49   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$52.49
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(346)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(218)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In 1959, a groundbreaking study of nonverbal communication, The Silent Language, was published to international acclaim. Written by Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist, it was one of the first books to examine the complex ways people communicate with one another without speaking. More than thirty years later, The Silent Language has never been out of print, has been translated into several languages, has sold more than 1.5 million copies in the U.S., and remains the definitive book in its field. Today, Ned Hall is a world-renowned expert in intercultural communication, sought after by government agencies, businesses and universities throughout the world for his expertise in interpreting the hidden meanings behind what people are saying to one another. Now, in a remarkably candid and personal book, he tells the story of the first fifty years of his fascinating life. Although it began inauspiciously when he was virtually abandoned by his parents to the care of others, his early exposure to diverse cultures started him on his path toward decoding the deeper, hidden layers of human behavior. By the time he was in his early twenties, he had lived in Missouri, New Mexico, France, Germany and on Indian reservations in the Southwest. Building dams with the Hopi and Navajo, he began to realize the very deep differences in these two dissimilar cultures and our own as to how each viewed time, space, bargains and other aspects of daily communication. While serving in the army during World War II, he perceived how the formal army culture differed from the informal one, adding further weight to the new theories he was developing. Working for the State Department under President Truman, he trained foreign service officers who were being sent to underdeveloped countries. Hall's message to them--that there were profound disparities in the attitudes of different cultures toward time, space and relationships--was considered almost heretical at the time. Today, Hall's books
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Anthropologist Hall turns his analytic eye on the first 50 years of his life, beginning in 1914, and measures the impact of his particular cultural experiences on the person he became. (Mar.)
Library Journal
In this autobiography of one of the most influential anthropologists of the last 30 years, Hall writes with the clarity and easygoing grace that have made his books popular with readers who eschew the jargon and statistics that clutter some social science books. Hall recounts many of the unusual events that shaped his outlook, from living in the Santa Fe artists' colony to working on Indian reservations in Arizona and serving with a black army regiment in World War II. A theme that reappears throughout the book is Hall's sincere efforts toward understanding other cultures systematically thwarted by an unsympathetic bureaucracy. Hall only succeeds in breaking through the bureaucratic barrier after he overcomes his own personal barriers during seven years of psychoanalysis. While quite engaging, this book may not be as useful to students and professionals as Hall's other works that help to explore our understanding of intercultural communication. For larger academic and public library collections.-- Eric Hinsdale, Simmons Coll. Graduate Sch. of Management Lib., Boston
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385237437
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/1/1993
  • Edition description: 1st Anchor Books ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.18 (w) x 7.97 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
Pt. I Early Days 1914-1931
1 Growing Up in the Twenties 3
2 The Mueller and Los Alamos Schools 17
3 The Aspen Ranch School 28
4 Living with the Artists 39
5 Impressionism in New Mexico 51
6 Something Alive 62
Pt. II Indian Country in the Thirties 1932-1935
7 Spider Woman 81
8 The Navajo and the Hopi 99
9 Nature's Classroom 118
Pt. III Transitions 1935-1949
10 The Hispanics 133
11 Army Life 146
12 The Micronesians 158
13 Academia: University of Denver 172
14 Academia: Bennington College 183
Pt. IV Washington, D.C. 1950-1963
15 The Diplomats at State 197
16 Definitions of Culture 209
17 The Devil's Name Was Time 217
18 The Psychiatrists 227
19 Broken Idols 244
20 The Underlying Truth 253
Notes 263
Bibliography 267
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)