An Arch Guidebook to Los Angeles

An Arch Guidebook to Los Angeles

5.0 2
by Robert Winter, David Gebhard
     
 

Known as "the bible" to Los Angeles architecture scholars and enthusiasts, Robert Winter and David Gebhard's groundbreaking guide to architecture in the greater Los Angeles area is updated and revised once again. From Art Deco to Beaux-Arts, Spanish Colonial to Mission Revival, Winter discusses an impressive variety of architectural styles in this popular guide

Overview

Known as "the bible" to Los Angeles architecture scholars and enthusiasts, Robert Winter and David Gebhard's groundbreaking guide to architecture in the greater Los Angeles area is updated and revised once again. From Art Deco to Beaux-Arts, Spanish Colonial to Mission Revival, Winter discusses an impressive variety of architectural styles in this popular guide that he co-authored with the late David Gebhard. New buildings and sites have been added, along with all new photography. Considered the most thorough L.A. architecture guide ever written, this new edition features the best of the past and present, from Charles and Henry Greene's Gamble House to Frank Gehry's Disney Philharmonic Hall. This was, and is again, a must-have guide to a diverse and architecturally rich area.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586853082
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
09/24/2003
Edition description:
Revised and updated
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
756,520
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.32(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

1. MALIBU

Malibu Beach did not begin its development until 1929, when the Pacific Coast Highway was finally pushed through the Rindge Ranch. After that, Malibu became a fashionable place to have a beach house. The hilly coastland of the West remained basically rural until the 1960s. Increasingly in recent years, the area between the highway and the beach is being filled with numerous large-scale houses. In the 1960s and early 1970s, most of these houses were loosely Modern in imagery, but in recent years historicism (usually grossly misunderstood) ranging from the Medieval to the Spanish Revival has prevailed. The land adjacent to the highway is slowly being condominiumized, with disappointing versions of varied architectural styles. In the early 1990s, Malibu was incorporated as an independent city. It will be interesting to see how it develops its own personality in the years to come.

Malibu continues to acquire houses of distinguished design, but the colony is a private, well-guarded world and is not open to the public.

1. Sagheb House, 1990

John Lautner

32402 Pacific Coast Highway

Since the 1960s, John Lautner has designed a number of houses on the Malibu coast. Most of these are of reinforced concrete in a highly organic (and unusual) form. Unfortunately, these houses are not easy to see from the road, but at low tide, an adventuresome person wandering along the beach can catch an occasional glimpse of them. Other Lautner houses in the Malibu area are the Krause House (1983) at 24444 Malibu Road, and the Segel House (1983) at 22426 Pacific Coast Highway.

Meet the Author

Robert Winter is a recognized architectural historian who lives in Los Angeles, and has led architectural tours through the Los Angeles area since 1965. He is a professor at Occidental College in Los Angeles

Noted architectural historian David Gebhard taught at the University of California at Santa Barbara and has been published extensively on American and European architecture.
Among his publications are The Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, revised edition, 2003) and The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (John Wiley, 1996).

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

An Arch Guidebook to Los Angeles 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
edougw More than 1 year ago
I made this purchase in anticipation of an employment opportunity with the City of Santa Barbara, where David Gebhard is revered posthumously as an architectural saint.  This revised edition contains updated listings of the more prominent and lesser known architectural  gems of Los Angeles and provides concise, albeit thumbnail sketches in an easy to find format.  A must have for the casual architectural buff,; I find it helpful as a reference piece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago